Using hemoglobin A1C as a predicting model for time interval from pre-diabetes progressing to diabetes

Chen-Ling Huang, Usman Iqbal, Phung Anh Nguyen, Zih Fang Chen, Daniel L. Clinciu, Yi Hsin Elsa Hsu, Chung Huei Hsu, Wen Shan Jian

研究成果: 雜誌貢獻文章

3 引文 (Scopus)

摘要

Objective: The early identification of subjects at high risk for diabetes is essential, thus, random rather than fasting plasma glucose is more useful. We aim to evaluate the time interval between pre-diabetes to diabetes with anti-diabetic drugs by using HbA1C as a diagnostic tool, and predicting it using a mathematic model. Methods: We used the Taipei Medical University Affiliated Hospital Patient Profile Database (AHPPD) from January-2007 to June-2011. The patients who progressed and were prescribed anti-diabetic drugs were selected from AHPPD. The mathematical model used to predict the time interval of HbA1C value ranged from 5.7% to 6.5% for diabetes progression. Results: We predicted an average overall time interval for all participants in between 5.7% to 6.5% during a total of 907 days (standard error, 103 days). For each group found among 5.7% to 6.5% we determined 1169.3 days for the low risk group (i.e. 3.2 years), 1080.5 days (i.e. 2.96 years) for the increased risk group and 729.4 days (i.e. 1.99 years) for the diabetes group. This indicates the patients will take an average of 2.49 years to reach 6.5%. Conclusion: This prediction model is very useful to help prioritize the diagnosis at an early stage for targeting individuals with risk of diabetes. Using patients' HbA1C before anti-diabetes drugs are used we predicted the time interval from prediabetes progression to diabetes is 2.49 years without any influence of age and gender. Additional studies are needed to support this model for a long term prediction.
原文英語
文章編號e104263
期刊PLoS One
9
發行號8
DOIs
出版狀態已發佈 - 八月 5 2014

指紋

Medical problems
diabetes
hemoglobin
Hemoglobins
hypoglycemic agents
risk groups
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Databases
Prediabetic State
Mathematics
Fasting
Theoretical Models
prediction
Glucose
fasting
mathematical models
Mathematical models
Plasmas
drugs
glucose

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

引用此文

Using hemoglobin A1C as a predicting model for time interval from pre-diabetes progressing to diabetes. / Huang, Chen-Ling; Iqbal, Usman; Nguyen, Phung Anh; Chen, Zih Fang; Clinciu, Daniel L.; Hsu, Yi Hsin Elsa; Hsu, Chung Huei; Jian, Wen Shan.

於: PLoS One, 卷 9, 編號 8, e104263, 05.08.2014.

研究成果: 雜誌貢獻文章

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abstract = "Objective: The early identification of subjects at high risk for diabetes is essential, thus, random rather than fasting plasma glucose is more useful. We aim to evaluate the time interval between pre-diabetes to diabetes with anti-diabetic drugs by using HbA1C as a diagnostic tool, and predicting it using a mathematic model. Methods: We used the Taipei Medical University Affiliated Hospital Patient Profile Database (AHPPD) from January-2007 to June-2011. The patients who progressed and were prescribed anti-diabetic drugs were selected from AHPPD. The mathematical model used to predict the time interval of HbA1C value ranged from 5.7{\%} to 6.5{\%} for diabetes progression. Results: We predicted an average overall time interval for all participants in between 5.7{\%} to 6.5{\%} during a total of 907 days (standard error, 103 days). For each group found among 5.7{\%} to 6.5{\%} we determined 1169.3 days for the low risk group (i.e. 3.2 years), 1080.5 days (i.e. 2.96 years) for the increased risk group and 729.4 days (i.e. 1.99 years) for the diabetes group. This indicates the patients will take an average of 2.49 years to reach 6.5{\%}. Conclusion: This prediction model is very useful to help prioritize the diagnosis at an early stage for targeting individuals with risk of diabetes. Using patients' HbA1C before anti-diabetes drugs are used we predicted the time interval from prediabetes progression to diabetes is 2.49 years without any influence of age and gender. Additional studies are needed to support this model for a long term prediction.",
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N2 - Objective: The early identification of subjects at high risk for diabetes is essential, thus, random rather than fasting plasma glucose is more useful. We aim to evaluate the time interval between pre-diabetes to diabetes with anti-diabetic drugs by using HbA1C as a diagnostic tool, and predicting it using a mathematic model. Methods: We used the Taipei Medical University Affiliated Hospital Patient Profile Database (AHPPD) from January-2007 to June-2011. The patients who progressed and were prescribed anti-diabetic drugs were selected from AHPPD. The mathematical model used to predict the time interval of HbA1C value ranged from 5.7% to 6.5% for diabetes progression. Results: We predicted an average overall time interval for all participants in between 5.7% to 6.5% during a total of 907 days (standard error, 103 days). For each group found among 5.7% to 6.5% we determined 1169.3 days for the low risk group (i.e. 3.2 years), 1080.5 days (i.e. 2.96 years) for the increased risk group and 729.4 days (i.e. 1.99 years) for the diabetes group. This indicates the patients will take an average of 2.49 years to reach 6.5%. Conclusion: This prediction model is very useful to help prioritize the diagnosis at an early stage for targeting individuals with risk of diabetes. Using patients' HbA1C before anti-diabetes drugs are used we predicted the time interval from prediabetes progression to diabetes is 2.49 years without any influence of age and gender. Additional studies are needed to support this model for a long term prediction.

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