Traumatic brain injury registry in Taiwan

W. T. Chiu, K. H. Yeh, Y. C. Li, Y. H. Can, H. Y. Chen, C. C. Hung

研究成果: 雜誌貢獻文章

37 引文 (Scopus)

摘要

This project was designed to examine the epidemiology of traumatic brain injury (TBI) in Taiwan. A total of 58,563 cases of TBI was collected from 114 hospitals in Taiwan during the period July 1, 1988-June 30, 1994. Traffic accident was the major cause of TBI (69.4%), followed by falls and assaults. Motorcyclists accounted for the vast majority of TBI cases among traffic accident victims (64.5%). The Glasgow Coma Scale was used in assessing the severity. 41,646 cases (79.5%) were considered mild, 4,637 cases (8.9%) moderate, and 6,078 cases (11.6%) severe. Skull x-ray showed fracture in 7,663 cases (14.6%). Intracranial hemorrhage was identified in 28.6% of patients receiving CT scanning. Craniotomy was performed in 5,226 cases (9%). The outcome of TBI was determined by the Glasgow Outcome Scale. Death occurred in 2,621 cases (5.4%), vegetative state in 429 cases (0.9%), severe disability in 1,293 cases (2.6%), moderate disability in 1,890 cases (3.9%), and good recovery in 42,596 cases (87.2%). The severity and outcome were worse than those of Western reports. In order to alleviate this problem, a helmet use persuasion program was conducted by the Police Department in Taipei City from January to June, 1994. Results of this program showed a significant reduction of TBI-related hospitalization, severity and fatality during this period of intervention. This study points out the seriousness of TBI in Taiwan and suggests some approaches and priorities for prevention.

原文英語
頁(從 - 到)261-264
頁數4
期刊Neurological Research
19
發行號3
出版狀態已發佈 - 1997

指紋

Taiwan
Registries
Traffic Accidents
Persuasive Communication
Glasgow Outcome Scale
Persistent Vegetative State
Head Protective Devices
Glasgow Coma Scale
Intracranial Hemorrhages
Craniotomy
Police
Traumatic Brain Injury
Skull
Epidemiology
Hospitalization
X-Rays

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neuroscience(all)

引用此文

Chiu, W. T., Yeh, K. H., Li, Y. C., Can, Y. H., Chen, H. Y., & Hung, C. C. (1997). Traumatic brain injury registry in Taiwan. Neurological Research, 19(3), 261-264.

Traumatic brain injury registry in Taiwan. / Chiu, W. T.; Yeh, K. H.; Li, Y. C.; Can, Y. H.; Chen, H. Y.; Hung, C. C.

於: Neurological Research, 卷 19, 編號 3, 1997, p. 261-264.

研究成果: 雜誌貢獻文章

Chiu, WT, Yeh, KH, Li, YC, Can, YH, Chen, HY & Hung, CC 1997, 'Traumatic brain injury registry in Taiwan', Neurological Research, 卷 19, 編號 3, 頁 261-264.
Chiu WT, Yeh KH, Li YC, Can YH, Chen HY, Hung CC. Traumatic brain injury registry in Taiwan. Neurological Research. 1997;19(3):261-264.
Chiu, W. T. ; Yeh, K. H. ; Li, Y. C. ; Can, Y. H. ; Chen, H. Y. ; Hung, C. C. / Traumatic brain injury registry in Taiwan. 於: Neurological Research. 1997 ; 卷 19, 編號 3. 頁 261-264.
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