Time-dependent persistence of enhanced immune response by a potential probiotic strain Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. paracasei NTU 101

Yueh Ting Tsai, Po Ching Cheng, Chia Kwung Fan, Tzu Ming Pan

研究成果: 雜誌貢獻文章

53 引文 (Scopus)

摘要

The possible time-dependent role of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) in immunomodulation was investigated in BALB/c mice fed daily with Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. paracasei NTU 101 (108 colony forming units) for 3, 6, and 9 weeks, and following feeding with Lactobacillus-free food for a further 7 days. We observed up-regulation of the antigen-presenting ability of dendritic cells, and expression of natural killer group-2 D (NKG2D) molecules capable of trigger natural killer cell-mediated cytotoxicity. Lymphocyte proliferation and antibody production were also significantly increased in mice after treatment. Innate and adaptive immunity remained constant even at the most protracted feeding time, indicative of the time dependence of the bacterial-mediated enhanced immunity. To better correlate intestinal microflora with immunity, the intestinal contents of probiotics and harmful microorganisms were determined. Results showed an altered intestinal microflora, with increases in bifidobacteria and lactobacilli and a decreased content of Clostridium perfringens after feeding with L. paracasei subsp. paracasei NTU 101. It is possible that persistent activation of immunity might be induced by intestinal probiotics.
原文英語
頁(從 - 到)219-225
頁數7
期刊International Journal of Food Microbiology
128
發行號2
DOIs
出版狀態已發佈 - 十二月 10 2008

指紋

Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. paracasei
Probiotics
probiotics
Immunity
immunity
immune response
Lactobacillus
intestinal microorganisms
Clostridium
Gastrointestinal Contents
Clostridium perfringens
immunomodulation
Bifidobacterium
Immunomodulation
Lymphocytes
mice
natural killer cells
Adaptive Immunity
antibody formation
dendritic cells

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Safety, Risk, Reliability and Quality
  • Microbiology

引用此文

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abstract = "The possible time-dependent role of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) in immunomodulation was investigated in BALB/c mice fed daily with Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. paracasei NTU 101 (108 colony forming units) for 3, 6, and 9 weeks, and following feeding with Lactobacillus-free food for a further 7 days. We observed up-regulation of the antigen-presenting ability of dendritic cells, and expression of natural killer group-2 D (NKG2D) molecules capable of trigger natural killer cell-mediated cytotoxicity. Lymphocyte proliferation and antibody production were also significantly increased in mice after treatment. Innate and adaptive immunity remained constant even at the most protracted feeding time, indicative of the time dependence of the bacterial-mediated enhanced immunity. To better correlate intestinal microflora with immunity, the intestinal contents of probiotics and harmful microorganisms were determined. Results showed an altered intestinal microflora, with increases in bifidobacteria and lactobacilli and a decreased content of Clostridium perfringens after feeding with L. paracasei subsp. paracasei NTU 101. It is possible that persistent activation of immunity might be induced by intestinal probiotics.",
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AU - Pan, Tzu Ming

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