The lack of association between febrile convulsions and polymorphisms in SCN1A

I. Ching Chou, Ching Tien Peng, Fuu Jen Tsai, Chao Ching Huang, Yi Ru Shi, Chang Hai Tsai

研究成果: 雜誌貢獻文章

19 引文 (Scopus)

摘要

Febrile convulsions (FCs) represent the majority of childhood seizures, and patients have a genetic predisposition to their development. The genetic susceptibility to FCs seems to involve multiple genes in most instances. Recent studies provided evidence that mutations in SCN1A represent the most frequent cause of generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus an autosomal-dominant epilepsy syndrome. SCN1A mutations alter channel inactivation, resulting in persistent inward sodium current. It is not known if polymorphisms in those genes involved in familial epilepsies also contribute to the pathogenesis of FCs. By performing an association study, we used single nucleotide polymorphisms to investigate the distribution of genotypes of SCN1A in patients with FCs. A total of 104 Taiwanese children with FCs and 83 normal control subjects were included in the study. Polymerase chain reaction was used to identify the A/G polymorphism of the SCN1A gene. The results showed that genotypes and allelic frequencies for the SCN1A gene polymorphisms in both groups were not significantly different. These data suggest that the SCN1A gene might not be one of the susceptibility factors for FCs. Pure FCs and febrile convulsions associated with idiopathic generalized epilepsy may not share a common genetic etiology.

原文英語
頁(從 - 到)53-57
頁數5
期刊Epilepsy Research
54
發行號1
DOIs
出版狀態已發佈 - 四月 1 2003
對外發佈Yes

指紋

Febrile Seizures
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genes
Epilepsy
Genotype
Mutation
Gene Frequency
Single Nucleotide Polymorphism
Seizures
Sodium
Polymerase Chain Reaction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Neurology

引用此文

The lack of association between febrile convulsions and polymorphisms in SCN1A. / Chou, I. Ching; Peng, Ching Tien; Tsai, Fuu Jen; Huang, Chao Ching; Shi, Yi Ru; Tsai, Chang Hai.

於: Epilepsy Research, 卷 54, 編號 1, 01.04.2003, p. 53-57.

研究成果: 雜誌貢獻文章

Chou, I. Ching ; Peng, Ching Tien ; Tsai, Fuu Jen ; Huang, Chao Ching ; Shi, Yi Ru ; Tsai, Chang Hai. / The lack of association between febrile convulsions and polymorphisms in SCN1A. 於: Epilepsy Research. 2003 ; 卷 54, 編號 1. 頁 53-57.
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