Socioeconomic deprivation and associated risk factors of traumatic brain injury in children

研究成果: 雜誌貢獻文章

10 引文 (Scopus)

摘要

BACKGROUND: This study aimed to investigate the relative risks of low income (family socioeconomic deprivation) and associated factors for traumatic brain injury (TBI) in children. METHODS: Using Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database and adjusting the covariates, we conducted a population-based case-control study analyzing 8,291 pediatric patients, aged 0 year to 17 years, diagnosed with TBI, and 33,164 sex- and age-matched controls to study the association of low income and TBI. The relative risks of TBI for socioeconomically deprived children with various coexisted medical conditions were evaluated. RESULTS: After adjustment, pediatric population with low income were at increased risk of TBI (odds ratio [OR], 1.71; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.52-1.92). Among the coexisting medical conditions, low-income pediatric population with mental disorders had significantly increased TBI risk when compared with matched controls (adjusted OR, 1.99; 95% CI, 1.51-2.63). Increased risk of TBI was also found in low-income children with epilepsy when compared with children of regular family income (adjusted OR, 3.11; 95% CI, 1.65-5.86). The adjusted OR of TBI for low-income children with mental disorders and epilepsy was as high as 4.45 (95% CI, 1.96-10.1). Among TBI patients, low-income children who had epilepsy were at significantly higher risk of post-TBI intracranial hemorrhage when compared with controls (OR, 10.6; 95% CI, 3.30-33.9). CONCLUSION: We found a significantly increased risk of TBI in socioeconomically deprived children, particularly among children with mental disorders, epilepsy, or both. Low-income children should be considered for special attention to reduce TBI risk and post-TBI morbidities. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Prognostic study, level III.

原文英語
頁(從 - 到)1327-1331
頁數5
期刊Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery
73
發行號5
DOIs
出版狀態已發佈 - 十一月 2012

指紋

Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Epilepsy
Poverty
Pediatrics
Traumatic Brain Injury
Social Adjustment
Intracranial Hemorrhages
National Health Programs
Taiwan
Mental Disorders
Case-Control Studies
Databases
Morbidity
Research
Population
Neurodevelopmental Disorders

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine
  • Surgery

引用此文

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title = "Socioeconomic deprivation and associated risk factors of traumatic brain injury in children",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: This study aimed to investigate the relative risks of low income (family socioeconomic deprivation) and associated factors for traumatic brain injury (TBI) in children. METHODS: Using Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database and adjusting the covariates, we conducted a population-based case-control study analyzing 8,291 pediatric patients, aged 0 year to 17 years, diagnosed with TBI, and 33,164 sex- and age-matched controls to study the association of low income and TBI. The relative risks of TBI for socioeconomically deprived children with various coexisted medical conditions were evaluated. RESULTS: After adjustment, pediatric population with low income were at increased risk of TBI (odds ratio [OR], 1.71; 95{\%} confidence interval [CI], 1.52-1.92). Among the coexisting medical conditions, low-income pediatric population with mental disorders had significantly increased TBI risk when compared with matched controls (adjusted OR, 1.99; 95{\%} CI, 1.51-2.63). Increased risk of TBI was also found in low-income children with epilepsy when compared with children of regular family income (adjusted OR, 3.11; 95{\%} CI, 1.65-5.86). The adjusted OR of TBI for low-income children with mental disorders and epilepsy was as high as 4.45 (95{\%} CI, 1.96-10.1). Among TBI patients, low-income children who had epilepsy were at significantly higher risk of post-TBI intracranial hemorrhage when compared with controls (OR, 10.6; 95{\%} CI, 3.30-33.9). CONCLUSION: We found a significantly increased risk of TBI in socioeconomically deprived children, particularly among children with mental disorders, epilepsy, or both. Low-income children should be considered for special attention to reduce TBI risk and post-TBI morbidities. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Prognostic study, level III.",
keywords = "Children, Epilepsy, Low income, Mental disorders, Socioeconomic deprivation, Traumatic brain injury",
author = "Liao, {Chien Chang} and Chang, {Huai Chia} and Yeh, {Chun Chieh} and Chou, {Yi Chun} and Chiu, {Wen Ta} and Chen, {Ta Liang}",
year = "2012",
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pages = "1327--1331",
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T1 - Socioeconomic deprivation and associated risk factors of traumatic brain injury in children

AU - Liao, Chien Chang

AU - Chang, Huai Chia

AU - Yeh, Chun Chieh

AU - Chou, Yi Chun

AU - Chiu, Wen Ta

AU - Chen, Ta Liang

PY - 2012/11

Y1 - 2012/11

N2 - BACKGROUND: This study aimed to investigate the relative risks of low income (family socioeconomic deprivation) and associated factors for traumatic brain injury (TBI) in children. METHODS: Using Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database and adjusting the covariates, we conducted a population-based case-control study analyzing 8,291 pediatric patients, aged 0 year to 17 years, diagnosed with TBI, and 33,164 sex- and age-matched controls to study the association of low income and TBI. The relative risks of TBI for socioeconomically deprived children with various coexisted medical conditions were evaluated. RESULTS: After adjustment, pediatric population with low income were at increased risk of TBI (odds ratio [OR], 1.71; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.52-1.92). Among the coexisting medical conditions, low-income pediatric population with mental disorders had significantly increased TBI risk when compared with matched controls (adjusted OR, 1.99; 95% CI, 1.51-2.63). Increased risk of TBI was also found in low-income children with epilepsy when compared with children of regular family income (adjusted OR, 3.11; 95% CI, 1.65-5.86). The adjusted OR of TBI for low-income children with mental disorders and epilepsy was as high as 4.45 (95% CI, 1.96-10.1). Among TBI patients, low-income children who had epilepsy were at significantly higher risk of post-TBI intracranial hemorrhage when compared with controls (OR, 10.6; 95% CI, 3.30-33.9). CONCLUSION: We found a significantly increased risk of TBI in socioeconomically deprived children, particularly among children with mental disorders, epilepsy, or both. Low-income children should be considered for special attention to reduce TBI risk and post-TBI morbidities. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Prognostic study, level III.

AB - BACKGROUND: This study aimed to investigate the relative risks of low income (family socioeconomic deprivation) and associated factors for traumatic brain injury (TBI) in children. METHODS: Using Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database and adjusting the covariates, we conducted a population-based case-control study analyzing 8,291 pediatric patients, aged 0 year to 17 years, diagnosed with TBI, and 33,164 sex- and age-matched controls to study the association of low income and TBI. The relative risks of TBI for socioeconomically deprived children with various coexisted medical conditions were evaluated. RESULTS: After adjustment, pediatric population with low income were at increased risk of TBI (odds ratio [OR], 1.71; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.52-1.92). Among the coexisting medical conditions, low-income pediatric population with mental disorders had significantly increased TBI risk when compared with matched controls (adjusted OR, 1.99; 95% CI, 1.51-2.63). Increased risk of TBI was also found in low-income children with epilepsy when compared with children of regular family income (adjusted OR, 3.11; 95% CI, 1.65-5.86). The adjusted OR of TBI for low-income children with mental disorders and epilepsy was as high as 4.45 (95% CI, 1.96-10.1). Among TBI patients, low-income children who had epilepsy were at significantly higher risk of post-TBI intracranial hemorrhage when compared with controls (OR, 10.6; 95% CI, 3.30-33.9). CONCLUSION: We found a significantly increased risk of TBI in socioeconomically deprived children, particularly among children with mental disorders, epilepsy, or both. Low-income children should be considered for special attention to reduce TBI risk and post-TBI morbidities. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Prognostic study, level III.

KW - Children

KW - Epilepsy

KW - Low income

KW - Mental disorders

KW - Socioeconomic deprivation

KW - Traumatic brain injury

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