Short-term exposure to noise, fine particulate matter and nitrogen oxides on ambulatory blood pressure

A repeated-measure study

Li Te Chang, Kai Jen Chuang, Wei Ting Yang, Ven Shing Wang, Hsiao Chi Chuang, Bo Ying Bao, Chiu Shong Liu, Ta Yuan Chang

研究成果: 雜誌貢獻文章

14 引文 (Scopus)

摘要

Exposure to road traffic noise, fine particulate matter (aerodynamic diameter ≤2.5μm; PM2.5) and nitrogen oxides (NOx) has been associated with transient changes in blood pressure, but whether an interaction exists remains unclear. This panel study investigated whether noise, PM2.5 and NOx exposure were independently associated with changes in 24-h ambulatory blood pressure. We recruited 33 males and 33 females aged 18-32 years as study subjects. Personal noise exposure and ambulatory blood pressure were monitored simultaneously in 2007. During the data collection periods, 24-h data on PM2.5 and NOx from five air-quality monitors within 6km of participants' home addresses were used to estimate their individual exposures. Linear mixed-effects regression models were used to estimate single and combined effects on ambulatory blood pressure. Exposure to both noise and PM2.5 was significantly associated with increased systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) over 24h; NOx exposure was only significantly related to elevated DBP. Twenty-four-hour ambulatory blood pressure increased with the current noise exposure of 5 A-weighted decibels (dBA) (SBP 1.44 [95% confidence interval: 1.16, 1.71]mmHg and DBP 1.40 [1.18, 1.61]mmHg) and PM2.5 exposure of 10-μg/m3 (SBP 0.81 [0.19, 1.43]mmHg and DBP 0.63 [0.17, 1.10]mmHg), as well as the current NOx exposure of 10-ppb (DBP 0.54 [0.12, 0.97]mmHg) after simultaneous adjustment. These findings suggest that exposure to noise and air pollutants may independently increase ambulatory blood pressure and the risk of cardiovascular diseases.
原文英語
頁(從 - 到)634-640
頁數7
期刊Environmental Research
140
DOIs
出版狀態已發佈 - 七月 1 2015

指紋

Nitrogen Oxides
Particulate Matter
Blood pressure
nitrogen oxides
Noise
particulate matter
blood
Blood Pressure
exposure
Air Pollutants
cardiovascular disease
Air quality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Biochemistry
  • Medicine(all)

引用此文

Short-term exposure to noise, fine particulate matter and nitrogen oxides on ambulatory blood pressure : A repeated-measure study. / Chang, Li Te; Chuang, Kai Jen; Yang, Wei Ting; Wang, Ven Shing; Chuang, Hsiao Chi; Bao, Bo Ying; Liu, Chiu Shong; Chang, Ta Yuan.

於: Environmental Research, 卷 140, 01.07.2015, p. 634-640.

研究成果: 雜誌貢獻文章

Chang, Li Te ; Chuang, Kai Jen ; Yang, Wei Ting ; Wang, Ven Shing ; Chuang, Hsiao Chi ; Bao, Bo Ying ; Liu, Chiu Shong ; Chang, Ta Yuan. / Short-term exposure to noise, fine particulate matter and nitrogen oxides on ambulatory blood pressure : A repeated-measure study. 於: Environmental Research. 2015 ; 卷 140. 頁 634-640.
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abstract = "Exposure to road traffic noise, fine particulate matter (aerodynamic diameter ≤2.5μm; PM2.5) and nitrogen oxides (NOx) has been associated with transient changes in blood pressure, but whether an interaction exists remains unclear. This panel study investigated whether noise, PM2.5 and NOx exposure were independently associated with changes in 24-h ambulatory blood pressure. We recruited 33 males and 33 females aged 18-32 years as study subjects. Personal noise exposure and ambulatory blood pressure were monitored simultaneously in 2007. During the data collection periods, 24-h data on PM2.5 and NOx from five air-quality monitors within 6km of participants' home addresses were used to estimate their individual exposures. Linear mixed-effects regression models were used to estimate single and combined effects on ambulatory blood pressure. Exposure to both noise and PM2.5 was significantly associated with increased systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) over 24h; NOx exposure was only significantly related to elevated DBP. Twenty-four-hour ambulatory blood pressure increased with the current noise exposure of 5 A-weighted decibels (dBA) (SBP 1.44 [95{\%} confidence interval: 1.16, 1.71]mmHg and DBP 1.40 [1.18, 1.61]mmHg) and PM2.5 exposure of 10-μg/m3 (SBP 0.81 [0.19, 1.43]mmHg and DBP 0.63 [0.17, 1.10]mmHg), as well as the current NOx exposure of 10-ppb (DBP 0.54 [0.12, 0.97]mmHg) after simultaneous adjustment. These findings suggest that exposure to noise and air pollutants may independently increase ambulatory blood pressure and the risk of cardiovascular diseases.",
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AU - Wang, Ven Shing

AU - Chuang, Hsiao Chi

AU - Bao, Bo Ying

AU - Liu, Chiu Shong

AU - Chang, Ta Yuan

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AB - Exposure to road traffic noise, fine particulate matter (aerodynamic diameter ≤2.5μm; PM2.5) and nitrogen oxides (NOx) has been associated with transient changes in blood pressure, but whether an interaction exists remains unclear. This panel study investigated whether noise, PM2.5 and NOx exposure were independently associated with changes in 24-h ambulatory blood pressure. We recruited 33 males and 33 females aged 18-32 years as study subjects. Personal noise exposure and ambulatory blood pressure were monitored simultaneously in 2007. During the data collection periods, 24-h data on PM2.5 and NOx from five air-quality monitors within 6km of participants' home addresses were used to estimate their individual exposures. Linear mixed-effects regression models were used to estimate single and combined effects on ambulatory blood pressure. Exposure to both noise and PM2.5 was significantly associated with increased systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) over 24h; NOx exposure was only significantly related to elevated DBP. Twenty-four-hour ambulatory blood pressure increased with the current noise exposure of 5 A-weighted decibels (dBA) (SBP 1.44 [95% confidence interval: 1.16, 1.71]mmHg and DBP 1.40 [1.18, 1.61]mmHg) and PM2.5 exposure of 10-μg/m3 (SBP 0.81 [0.19, 1.43]mmHg and DBP 0.63 [0.17, 1.10]mmHg), as well as the current NOx exposure of 10-ppb (DBP 0.54 [0.12, 0.97]mmHg) after simultaneous adjustment. These findings suggest that exposure to noise and air pollutants may independently increase ambulatory blood pressure and the risk of cardiovascular diseases.

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KW - Hypertension

KW - Nitrogen oxides

KW - Noise

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