Self-perception of body weight

Randy M. Page, Ching Mei Lee, Nae-Fang Miao

研究成果: 書貢獻/報告類型章節

摘要

This chapter will describe the self-perception of body weight and other weight-related factors among 2,665 Taipei high school students. A high percent of the girls (70.7%) and boys (42.2%) reported that they were too fat and these percentages were much higher than those reported by US students in a recent Youth Risk Behavior Survey. In addition, only 13.2% of girls and 22.0% of boys reported being completely satisfied with their weight and the level of dissatisfaction with weight appeared to be greater than among US students. Yet, in comparison to US students, the Taiwanese students were considerably less likely than their US counterparts to engage in weight management practices (e.g., dieting, eating less food, using diet pills). Taiwanese students with a self-perception of being too fat were more likely than those with perceptions of being just right or too thin to engage in weight management practices, to be dissatisfied with their weight, feel that they were unattractive, estimate that their same-sex peers were trying to loose weight, and have a higher body mass index. The findings from this study showed a relationship between self-perception of body size and engaging in weight control behaviors was consistent with other research. It suggested that self-perception of body weight, more so than objective weight status, was predictive of weight loss behavior and also negative psychological outcomes associated with poor body weight image. As a result, selfperception of weight may be an important point of focus for the design and implementation of clinical and public health initiatives targeted at this adolescent population as well as others.

原文英語
主出版物標題Obesity and Adolescence: A Public Health Concern
發行者Nova Science Publishers, Inc.
頁面139-153
頁數15
ISBN(列印)9781606928219
出版狀態已發佈 - 2009

指紋

body weight
Self Concept
self-image
Body Weight
Weights and Measures
Students
student
Practice Management
behavior control
eating behavior
management
risk behavior
Fats
public health
Behavior Control
food
Body Image
adolescent
Body Size
Risk-Taking

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Social Sciences(all)

引用此文

Page, R. M., Lee, C. M., & Miao, N-F. (2009). Self-perception of body weight. 於 Obesity and Adolescence: A Public Health Concern (頁 139-153). Nova Science Publishers, Inc..

Self-perception of body weight. / Page, Randy M.; Lee, Ching Mei; Miao, Nae-Fang.

Obesity and Adolescence: A Public Health Concern. Nova Science Publishers, Inc., 2009. p. 139-153.

研究成果: 書貢獻/報告類型章節

Page, RM, Lee, CM & Miao, N-F 2009, Self-perception of body weight. 於 Obesity and Adolescence: A Public Health Concern. Nova Science Publishers, Inc., 頁 139-153.
Page RM, Lee CM, Miao N-F. Self-perception of body weight. 於 Obesity and Adolescence: A Public Health Concern. Nova Science Publishers, Inc. 2009. p. 139-153
Page, Randy M. ; Lee, Ching Mei ; Miao, Nae-Fang. / Self-perception of body weight. Obesity and Adolescence: A Public Health Concern. Nova Science Publishers, Inc., 2009. 頁 139-153
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