Second-order relational manipulations affect both humans and monkeys

Christoph D. Dahl, Nikos K. Logothetis, Heinrich H. Bülthoff, Christian Wallraven

研究成果: 雜誌貢獻文章同行評審

8 引文 斯高帕斯(Scopus)

摘要

Recognition and individuation of conspecifics by their face is essential for primate social cognition. This ability is driven by a mechanism that integrates the appearance of facial features with subtle variations in their configuration (i.e., second-order relational properties) into a holistic representation. So far, there is little evidence of whether our evolutionary ancestors show sensitivity to featural spatial relations and hence holistic processing of faces as shown in humans. Here, we directly compared macaques with humans in their sensitivity to configurally altered faces in upright and inverted orientations using a habituation paradigm and eye tracking technologies. In addition, we tested for differences in processing of conspecific faces (human faces for humans, macaque faces for macaques) and non-conspecific faces, addressing aspects of perceptual expertise. In both species, we found sensitivity to second-order relational properties for conspecific (expert) faces, when presented in upright, not in inverted, orientation. This shows that macaques possess the requirements for holistic processing, and thus show similar face processing to that of humans.

原文英語
文章編號e25793
期刊PLoS ONE
6
發行號10
DOIs
出版狀態已發佈 - 十月 3 2011
對外發佈Yes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

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