Responsiveness and Predictive Validity of the Participation Measure–3 Domains, 4 Dimensions in Survivors of Stroke

Feng Hang Chang, Pengsheng Ni

研究成果: 雜誌貢獻文章

摘要

Objectives: To examine the responsiveness and predictive validity of the Participation Measure–3 Domains, 4 Dimensions (PM-3D4D) in people receiving outpatient rehabilitation following stroke. Design: Prospective cohort observational study. Setting: Outpatient rehabilitation settings. Participants: Volunteer patients (N=269) with stroke (mean age ± SD [y], 55.36±12.46; 70.26% male). Interventions: Not applicable. Main Outcome Measures: The PM-3D4D was designed to measure 3 domains (Productivity, Social, and Community) and 4 dimensions (Diversity, Frequency, Desire for change, and Difficulty) of participation in individuals with rehabilitation needs. All participants completed the PM-3D4D, the Participation Assessment with Recombined Tools-Objective (PART-O), the Participation Measure for Post-Acute Care (PM-PAC), and the EuroQol-5-Dimension (EQ-5D) at the baseline assessment and again following 3 months of outpatient rehabilitation. Results: Significant mean changes in scores were observed for most of the PM-3D4D subscales, with the largest score change observed in the Difficulty subscale (standardized response mean=0.57∼0.88). The minimal detectable change and meaningful clinically important differences were calculated for each subscale. The Frequency and Difficulty dimensions of the PM-3D4D demonstrated significantly greater responsiveness than the PART-O and PM-PAC, respectively. The baseline PM-3D4D scores, except for Desire for change subscales, were significantly correlated with the PART-O, PM-PAC, and EQ-5D scores after 3 months of rehabilitation. Conclusions: This study provides evidence supporting the responsiveness and predictive validity of the PM-3D4D in survivors of stroke. Among all subscales of the PM-3D4D, the Difficulty dimensional scale demonstrated the greatest responsiveness. The Desire for change dimension of the PM-3D4D showed less responsiveness, and we recommend that it be used as a goal-setting tool rather than an outcome measure. The PM-3D4D can potentially be used to predict participation outcomes and the health-related quality of life following rehabilitation interventions.

原文英語
期刊Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
DOIs
出版狀態接受/付印 - 一月 1 2019

指紋

Subacute Care
Survivors
Rehabilitation
Stroke
Outpatients
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Observational Studies
Volunteers
Cohort Studies
Quality of Life

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Rehabilitation

引用此文

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title = "Responsiveness and Predictive Validity of the Participation Measure–3 Domains, 4 Dimensions in Survivors of Stroke",
abstract = "Objectives: To examine the responsiveness and predictive validity of the Participation Measure–3 Domains, 4 Dimensions (PM-3D4D) in people receiving outpatient rehabilitation following stroke. Design: Prospective cohort observational study. Setting: Outpatient rehabilitation settings. Participants: Volunteer patients (N=269) with stroke (mean age ± SD [y], 55.36±12.46; 70.26{\%} male). Interventions: Not applicable. Main Outcome Measures: The PM-3D4D was designed to measure 3 domains (Productivity, Social, and Community) and 4 dimensions (Diversity, Frequency, Desire for change, and Difficulty) of participation in individuals with rehabilitation needs. All participants completed the PM-3D4D, the Participation Assessment with Recombined Tools-Objective (PART-O), the Participation Measure for Post-Acute Care (PM-PAC), and the EuroQol-5-Dimension (EQ-5D) at the baseline assessment and again following 3 months of outpatient rehabilitation. Results: Significant mean changes in scores were observed for most of the PM-3D4D subscales, with the largest score change observed in the Difficulty subscale (standardized response mean=0.57∼0.88). The minimal detectable change and meaningful clinically important differences were calculated for each subscale. The Frequency and Difficulty dimensions of the PM-3D4D demonstrated significantly greater responsiveness than the PART-O and PM-PAC, respectively. The baseline PM-3D4D scores, except for Desire for change subscales, were significantly correlated with the PART-O, PM-PAC, and EQ-5D scores after 3 months of rehabilitation. Conclusions: This study provides evidence supporting the responsiveness and predictive validity of the PM-3D4D in survivors of stroke. Among all subscales of the PM-3D4D, the Difficulty dimensional scale demonstrated the greatest responsiveness. The Desire for change dimension of the PM-3D4D showed less responsiveness, and we recommend that it be used as a goal-setting tool rather than an outcome measure. The PM-3D4D can potentially be used to predict participation outcomes and the health-related quality of life following rehabilitation interventions.",
keywords = "Outpatients, Psychometrics, Rehabilitation, Social participation, Stroke",
author = "Chang, {Feng Hang} and Pengsheng Ni",
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doi = "10.1016/j.apmr.2019.06.018",
language = "English",
journal = "Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation",
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AU - Chang, Feng Hang

AU - Ni, Pengsheng

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N2 - Objectives: To examine the responsiveness and predictive validity of the Participation Measure–3 Domains, 4 Dimensions (PM-3D4D) in people receiving outpatient rehabilitation following stroke. Design: Prospective cohort observational study. Setting: Outpatient rehabilitation settings. Participants: Volunteer patients (N=269) with stroke (mean age ± SD [y], 55.36±12.46; 70.26% male). Interventions: Not applicable. Main Outcome Measures: The PM-3D4D was designed to measure 3 domains (Productivity, Social, and Community) and 4 dimensions (Diversity, Frequency, Desire for change, and Difficulty) of participation in individuals with rehabilitation needs. All participants completed the PM-3D4D, the Participation Assessment with Recombined Tools-Objective (PART-O), the Participation Measure for Post-Acute Care (PM-PAC), and the EuroQol-5-Dimension (EQ-5D) at the baseline assessment and again following 3 months of outpatient rehabilitation. Results: Significant mean changes in scores were observed for most of the PM-3D4D subscales, with the largest score change observed in the Difficulty subscale (standardized response mean=0.57∼0.88). The minimal detectable change and meaningful clinically important differences were calculated for each subscale. The Frequency and Difficulty dimensions of the PM-3D4D demonstrated significantly greater responsiveness than the PART-O and PM-PAC, respectively. The baseline PM-3D4D scores, except for Desire for change subscales, were significantly correlated with the PART-O, PM-PAC, and EQ-5D scores after 3 months of rehabilitation. Conclusions: This study provides evidence supporting the responsiveness and predictive validity of the PM-3D4D in survivors of stroke. Among all subscales of the PM-3D4D, the Difficulty dimensional scale demonstrated the greatest responsiveness. The Desire for change dimension of the PM-3D4D showed less responsiveness, and we recommend that it be used as a goal-setting tool rather than an outcome measure. The PM-3D4D can potentially be used to predict participation outcomes and the health-related quality of life following rehabilitation interventions.

AB - Objectives: To examine the responsiveness and predictive validity of the Participation Measure–3 Domains, 4 Dimensions (PM-3D4D) in people receiving outpatient rehabilitation following stroke. Design: Prospective cohort observational study. Setting: Outpatient rehabilitation settings. Participants: Volunteer patients (N=269) with stroke (mean age ± SD [y], 55.36±12.46; 70.26% male). Interventions: Not applicable. Main Outcome Measures: The PM-3D4D was designed to measure 3 domains (Productivity, Social, and Community) and 4 dimensions (Diversity, Frequency, Desire for change, and Difficulty) of participation in individuals with rehabilitation needs. All participants completed the PM-3D4D, the Participation Assessment with Recombined Tools-Objective (PART-O), the Participation Measure for Post-Acute Care (PM-PAC), and the EuroQol-5-Dimension (EQ-5D) at the baseline assessment and again following 3 months of outpatient rehabilitation. Results: Significant mean changes in scores were observed for most of the PM-3D4D subscales, with the largest score change observed in the Difficulty subscale (standardized response mean=0.57∼0.88). The minimal detectable change and meaningful clinically important differences were calculated for each subscale. The Frequency and Difficulty dimensions of the PM-3D4D demonstrated significantly greater responsiveness than the PART-O and PM-PAC, respectively. The baseline PM-3D4D scores, except for Desire for change subscales, were significantly correlated with the PART-O, PM-PAC, and EQ-5D scores after 3 months of rehabilitation. Conclusions: This study provides evidence supporting the responsiveness and predictive validity of the PM-3D4D in survivors of stroke. Among all subscales of the PM-3D4D, the Difficulty dimensional scale demonstrated the greatest responsiveness. The Desire for change dimension of the PM-3D4D showed less responsiveness, and we recommend that it be used as a goal-setting tool rather than an outcome measure. The PM-3D4D can potentially be used to predict participation outcomes and the health-related quality of life following rehabilitation interventions.

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