Relationship between pain-specific beliefs and adherence to analgesic regimens in Taiwanese cancer patients: A preliminary study

Yeur Hur Lai, Francis J. Keefe, Wei Zen Sun, Lee Yuan Tsai, Ping Ling Cheng, Jeng Fong Chiou, Ling Ling Wei

研究成果: 雜誌貢獻文章

57 引文 (Scopus)

摘要

This pilot cross-sectional study aimed to 1) explore pain beliefs and adherence to prescribed analgesics in Taiwanese cancer patients, and 2) examine how selected pain beliefs, pain sensory characteristics, and demographic factors predict analgesic adherence. Pain beliefs were measured by the Chinese version of Pain and Opioid Analgesic Beliefs Scale - Cancer (POABS-CA) and the Survey of Pain Attitudes (SOPA). Analgesic adherence was measured by patient self-report of all prescribed pain medicine taken during the previous 7 days. Only 66.5% of hospitalized cancer patients with pain (n = 194) adhered to their analgesic regimen. Overall, patients had relatively high mean scores in beliefs about disability, medications, negative effects, and pain endurance, and low scores in control and emotion beliefs. Medication and control beliefs significantly predicted analgesic adherence. Patients with higher medication beliefs and lower control beliefs were more likely to be adherent. Findings support the importance of selected pain beliefs in patients' adherence to analgesics, suggesting that pain beliefs be assessed and integrated into pain management and patient education to enhance adherence.

原文英語
頁(從 - 到)415-423
頁數9
期刊Journal of Pain and Symptom Management
24
發行號4
DOIs
出版狀態已發佈 - 十月 1 2003

指紋

Analgesics
Pain
Neoplasms
Patient Education
Pain Management
Patient Compliance
Self Report
Opioid Analgesics
Emotions
Cross-Sectional Studies
Medicine
Demography

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neurology
  • Nursing(all)

引用此文

Relationship between pain-specific beliefs and adherence to analgesic regimens in Taiwanese cancer patients : A preliminary study. / Lai, Yeur Hur; Keefe, Francis J.; Sun, Wei Zen; Tsai, Lee Yuan; Cheng, Ping Ling; Chiou, Jeng Fong; Wei, Ling Ling.

於: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management, 卷 24, 編號 4, 01.10.2003, p. 415-423.

研究成果: 雜誌貢獻文章

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