Plasma adiponectin and hepatocellular carcinoma survival among patients without liver transplantation

Jing Shen, Chih Ching Yeh, Qiao Wang, Irina Gurvich, Abby B. Siegel, Regina M. Santella

研究成果: 雜誌貢獻文章

4 引文 (Scopus)

摘要

Aim: To investigate the levels of leptin and adiponectin in prediction of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) survival among patients without liver transplantation. Materials and Methods: We measured pretreatment plasma leptin and adiponectin in 172 HCC cases who were prospectively followed-up over 7 years. Results: Gender, hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, high body mass index (BMI), diabetes mellitus (DM) history and Child-Pugh (CP) class were associated with leptin and adiponectin levels, while fetoprotein (AFP) and presence of metastasis, being outside the Milan criteria and Barcelona clinic liver cancer (BCLC) stage, were significantly associated with liver transplantation and HCC survival. No significant association was observed for leptin or adiponectin and HCC survival in the overall group. In subgroup analyses among those without liver transplantation, we found significant associations between metastasis, Milan criteria, BCLC stage, hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and HCC survival. When separately determining the Cox proportional hazard models and Kaplan-Meier survival curves by liver transplantation status, higher adiponectin was significantly associated with an increased hazard ratio (HR) of death of 1.72 (95% confidence interval (CI)=1.12-2.64), i.e. poor survival among patients without liver transplantation. A multivariate Cox proportional hazard model, including adiponectin, CP class, presence of metastasis, tumor outside of Milan criteria, AFP and BCLC stage B/C parameters, also showed significant association with poor HCC survival (likelihood ratio test p<0.0001). No significant impact was observed for leptin on HCC survival regardless of liver transplantation status. Conclusion: Higher levels of plasma adiponectin may predict poor HCC survival among patients without liver transplantation.
原文英語
頁(從 - 到)5307-5314
頁數8
期刊Anticancer Research
36
發行號10
DOIs
出版狀態已發佈 - 十月 1 2016

指紋

Adiponectin
Liver Transplantation
Hepatocellular Carcinoma
Leptin
Survival
Liver Neoplasms
Neoplasm Metastasis
Proportional Hazards Models
Fetal Proteins
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Virus Diseases
Hepatitis B Surface Antigens
Hepatitis B virus
Hepacivirus
Diabetes Mellitus
Body Mass Index
Confidence Intervals

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

引用此文

Plasma adiponectin and hepatocellular carcinoma survival among patients without liver transplantation. / Shen, Jing; Yeh, Chih Ching; Wang, Qiao; Gurvich, Irina; Siegel, Abby B.; Santella, Regina M.

於: Anticancer Research, 卷 36, 編號 10, 01.10.2016, p. 5307-5314.

研究成果: 雜誌貢獻文章

Shen, Jing ; Yeh, Chih Ching ; Wang, Qiao ; Gurvich, Irina ; Siegel, Abby B. ; Santella, Regina M. / Plasma adiponectin and hepatocellular carcinoma survival among patients without liver transplantation. 於: Anticancer Research. 2016 ; 卷 36, 編號 10. 頁 5307-5314.
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abstract = "Aim: To investigate the levels of leptin and adiponectin in prediction of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) survival among patients without liver transplantation. Materials and Methods: We measured pretreatment plasma leptin and adiponectin in 172 HCC cases who were prospectively followed-up over 7 years. Results: Gender, hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, high body mass index (BMI), diabetes mellitus (DM) history and Child-Pugh (CP) class were associated with leptin and adiponectin levels, while fetoprotein (AFP) and presence of metastasis, being outside the Milan criteria and Barcelona clinic liver cancer (BCLC) stage, were significantly associated with liver transplantation and HCC survival. No significant association was observed for leptin or adiponectin and HCC survival in the overall group. In subgroup analyses among those without liver transplantation, we found significant associations between metastasis, Milan criteria, BCLC stage, hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and HCC survival. When separately determining the Cox proportional hazard models and Kaplan-Meier survival curves by liver transplantation status, higher adiponectin was significantly associated with an increased hazard ratio (HR) of death of 1.72 (95{\%} confidence interval (CI)=1.12-2.64), i.e. poor survival among patients without liver transplantation. A multivariate Cox proportional hazard model, including adiponectin, CP class, presence of metastasis, tumor outside of Milan criteria, AFP and BCLC stage B/C parameters, also showed significant association with poor HCC survival (likelihood ratio test p<0.0001). No significant impact was observed for leptin on HCC survival regardless of liver transplantation status. Conclusion: Higher levels of plasma adiponectin may predict poor HCC survival among patients without liver transplantation.",
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AU - Gurvich, Irina

AU - Siegel, Abby B.

AU - Santella, Regina M.

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N2 - Aim: To investigate the levels of leptin and adiponectin in prediction of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) survival among patients without liver transplantation. Materials and Methods: We measured pretreatment plasma leptin and adiponectin in 172 HCC cases who were prospectively followed-up over 7 years. Results: Gender, hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, high body mass index (BMI), diabetes mellitus (DM) history and Child-Pugh (CP) class were associated with leptin and adiponectin levels, while fetoprotein (AFP) and presence of metastasis, being outside the Milan criteria and Barcelona clinic liver cancer (BCLC) stage, were significantly associated with liver transplantation and HCC survival. No significant association was observed for leptin or adiponectin and HCC survival in the overall group. In subgroup analyses among those without liver transplantation, we found significant associations between metastasis, Milan criteria, BCLC stage, hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and HCC survival. When separately determining the Cox proportional hazard models and Kaplan-Meier survival curves by liver transplantation status, higher adiponectin was significantly associated with an increased hazard ratio (HR) of death of 1.72 (95% confidence interval (CI)=1.12-2.64), i.e. poor survival among patients without liver transplantation. A multivariate Cox proportional hazard model, including adiponectin, CP class, presence of metastasis, tumor outside of Milan criteria, AFP and BCLC stage B/C parameters, also showed significant association with poor HCC survival (likelihood ratio test p<0.0001). No significant impact was observed for leptin on HCC survival regardless of liver transplantation status. Conclusion: Higher levels of plasma adiponectin may predict poor HCC survival among patients without liver transplantation.

AB - Aim: To investigate the levels of leptin and adiponectin in prediction of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) survival among patients without liver transplantation. Materials and Methods: We measured pretreatment plasma leptin and adiponectin in 172 HCC cases who were prospectively followed-up over 7 years. Results: Gender, hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, high body mass index (BMI), diabetes mellitus (DM) history and Child-Pugh (CP) class were associated with leptin and adiponectin levels, while fetoprotein (AFP) and presence of metastasis, being outside the Milan criteria and Barcelona clinic liver cancer (BCLC) stage, were significantly associated with liver transplantation and HCC survival. No significant association was observed for leptin or adiponectin and HCC survival in the overall group. In subgroup analyses among those without liver transplantation, we found significant associations between metastasis, Milan criteria, BCLC stage, hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and HCC survival. When separately determining the Cox proportional hazard models and Kaplan-Meier survival curves by liver transplantation status, higher adiponectin was significantly associated with an increased hazard ratio (HR) of death of 1.72 (95% confidence interval (CI)=1.12-2.64), i.e. poor survival among patients without liver transplantation. A multivariate Cox proportional hazard model, including adiponectin, CP class, presence of metastasis, tumor outside of Milan criteria, AFP and BCLC stage B/C parameters, also showed significant association with poor HCC survival (likelihood ratio test p<0.0001). No significant impact was observed for leptin on HCC survival regardless of liver transplantation status. Conclusion: Higher levels of plasma adiponectin may predict poor HCC survival among patients without liver transplantation.

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