Olfactory-Experience- and Developmental-Stage-Dependent Control of CPEB4 Regulates c-Fos mRNA Translation for Granule Cell Survival

Ching San Tseng, Hsu Wen Chao, Hsien Sung Huang, Yi Shuian Huang

研究成果: 雜誌貢獻文章

2 引文 (Scopus)

摘要

Mammalian olfactory bulbs (OBs) require continuous replenishment of interneurons (mainly granule cells [GCs]) to support local circuits throughout life. Two spatiotemporally distinct waves of postnatal neurogenesis contribute to expanding and maintaining the GC pool. Although neonate-born GCs have a higher survival rate than adult-born GCs, the molecular mechanism underlying this survival remains unclear. Here, we find that cytoplasmic polyadenylation element-binding protein 4 (CPEB4) acts as a survival factor exclusively for early postnatal GCs. In mice, during the first 2 postnatal weeks, olfactory experience initiated CPEB4-activated c-Fos mRNA translation. In CPEB4-knockout mice, c-FOS insufficiency reduced neurotrophic signaling to impair GC survival and cause OB hypoplasia. Both cyclic AMP responsive element binding protein (CREB)-dependent transcription and CPEB4-promoted translation support c-FOS expression early postnatal OBs but disengage in adult OBs. Activity-related c-FOS synthesis and GC survival are thus developmentally controlled by distinct molecular mechanisms to govern OB growth. Tseng et al. find that olfactory-stimulation- and early-postnatal time-dependent control of CPEB4 activates c-Fos translation for granule cell survival. The authors propose that CPEB4 coordinates with CREB-mediated transcription to increase c-FOS expression, regulation that is lost in adult mice.
原文英語
頁(從 - 到)2264-2276
頁數13
期刊Cell Reports
21
發行號8
DOIs
出版狀態已發佈 - 十一月 21 2017

指紋

Polyadenylation
Protein Biosynthesis
Cell Survival
Carrier Proteins
Olfactory Bulb
Cells
Messenger RNA
Cyclic AMP
Transcription
Neurogenesis
Interneurons
Knockout Mice
Growth
Networks (circuits)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

引用此文

Olfactory-Experience- and Developmental-Stage-Dependent Control of CPEB4 Regulates c-Fos mRNA Translation for Granule Cell Survival. / Tseng, Ching San; Chao, Hsu Wen; Huang, Hsien Sung; Huang, Yi Shuian.

於: Cell Reports, 卷 21, 編號 8, 21.11.2017, p. 2264-2276.

研究成果: 雜誌貢獻文章

Tseng, Ching San ; Chao, Hsu Wen ; Huang, Hsien Sung ; Huang, Yi Shuian. / Olfactory-Experience- and Developmental-Stage-Dependent Control of CPEB4 Regulates c-Fos mRNA Translation for Granule Cell Survival. 於: Cell Reports. 2017 ; 卷 21, 編號 8. 頁 2264-2276.
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AB - Mammalian olfactory bulbs (OBs) require continuous replenishment of interneurons (mainly granule cells [GCs]) to support local circuits throughout life. Two spatiotemporally distinct waves of postnatal neurogenesis contribute to expanding and maintaining the GC pool. Although neonate-born GCs have a higher survival rate than adult-born GCs, the molecular mechanism underlying this survival remains unclear. Here, we find that cytoplasmic polyadenylation element-binding protein 4 (CPEB4) acts as a survival factor exclusively for early postnatal GCs. In mice, during the first 2 postnatal weeks, olfactory experience initiated CPEB4-activated c-Fos mRNA translation. In CPEB4-knockout mice, c-FOS insufficiency reduced neurotrophic signaling to impair GC survival and cause OB hypoplasia. Both cyclic AMP responsive element binding protein (CREB)-dependent transcription and CPEB4-promoted translation support c-FOS expression early postnatal OBs but disengage in adult OBs. Activity-related c-FOS synthesis and GC survival are thus developmentally controlled by distinct molecular mechanisms to govern OB growth. Tseng et al. find that olfactory-stimulation- and early-postnatal time-dependent control of CPEB4 activates c-Fos translation for granule cell survival. The authors propose that CPEB4 coordinates with CREB-mediated transcription to increase c-FOS expression, regulation that is lost in adult mice.

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