Occupational and personal factors associated with acquired lumbar spondylolisthesis of urban taxi drivers

J. C. Chen, W. P. Chan, J. N. Katz, W. P. Chang, D. C. Christiani

研究成果: 雜誌貢獻文章

22 引文 (Scopus)

摘要

Aims: To investigate the occupational and personal factors associated with lumbar spondylolisthesis in taxi drivers. Methods: Cross-sectional analysis of the baseline data from the Taxi Drivers' Health Study cohort. Information was retrieved from the medical records of standardised lumbosacral spine plain films, age, and anthropometric measures of 1242 subjects. Acquired spondylolisthesis (ASL) was defined as non-lytic spondylolisthesis involving lumbar spines above L5. Questionnaires were used to gather information on demographic features, health behaviours, exercise, work related physical and psychosocial factors, and driving time profiles. Multiple logistic regression was used to model the odds ratio (OR) for prevalent ASL cases associated with personal and occupational factors. Results: A total of 40 cases (3.2%) of ASL were diagnosed. Among those driving ≤ 5 years, 6-15 years, and > 15 years, the estimated prevalence of lumbar spondylolisthesis was 1.1%, 2.4%, and 7.1% respectively. Results of multiple logistic regression suggested that taxicab driving > 15 years (OR = 3.4, 95% Cl 1.1 to 10.7, compared to driving ≤ 5 years), age (OR = 2.6, 95% Cl 1.1 to 6.6 for age 46-55; and OR = 4.8, 95% Cl 1.8 to 12.9 for age > 55), body mass index ≥ 25 kg/m2 (OR = 2.2, 95% Cl 1.1 to 4.6), and frequent strenuous exercise (OR = 2.2, 95% Cl 1.1 to 4.5) were significantly associated with higher prevalence of spondylolisthesis. There was a consistent likely exposure-response relation between professional seniority and ASL prevalence. Conclusions: Longitudinal studies are needed to confirm the observed association between professional driving and spondylolisthesis, and to examine further the specific occupational exposures accountable for this association.

原文英語
頁(從 - 到)992-998
頁數7
期刊Occupational and Environmental Medicine
61
發行號12
DOIs
出版狀態已發佈 - 十二月 2004
對外發佈Yes

指紋

Spondylolisthesis
taxis
Odds Ratio
logistics
occupational exposure
body mass
Spine
Logistic Models
Health Behavior
Occupational Exposure
Motion Pictures
Medical Records
Longitudinal Studies
Body Mass Index
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Demography
Psychology
health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Environmental Science(all)

引用此文

Occupational and personal factors associated with acquired lumbar spondylolisthesis of urban taxi drivers. / Chen, J. C.; Chan, W. P.; Katz, J. N.; Chang, W. P.; Christiani, D. C.

於: Occupational and Environmental Medicine, 卷 61, 編號 12, 12.2004, p. 992-998.

研究成果: 雜誌貢獻文章

Chen, J. C. ; Chan, W. P. ; Katz, J. N. ; Chang, W. P. ; Christiani, D. C. / Occupational and personal factors associated with acquired lumbar spondylolisthesis of urban taxi drivers. 於: Occupational and Environmental Medicine. 2004 ; 卷 61, 編號 12. 頁 992-998.
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abstract = "Aims: To investigate the occupational and personal factors associated with lumbar spondylolisthesis in taxi drivers. Methods: Cross-sectional analysis of the baseline data from the Taxi Drivers' Health Study cohort. Information was retrieved from the medical records of standardised lumbosacral spine plain films, age, and anthropometric measures of 1242 subjects. Acquired spondylolisthesis (ASL) was defined as non-lytic spondylolisthesis involving lumbar spines above L5. Questionnaires were used to gather information on demographic features, health behaviours, exercise, work related physical and psychosocial factors, and driving time profiles. Multiple logistic regression was used to model the odds ratio (OR) for prevalent ASL cases associated with personal and occupational factors. Results: A total of 40 cases (3.2{\%}) of ASL were diagnosed. Among those driving ≤ 5 years, 6-15 years, and > 15 years, the estimated prevalence of lumbar spondylolisthesis was 1.1{\%}, 2.4{\%}, and 7.1{\%} respectively. Results of multiple logistic regression suggested that taxicab driving > 15 years (OR = 3.4, 95{\%} Cl 1.1 to 10.7, compared to driving ≤ 5 years), age (OR = 2.6, 95{\%} Cl 1.1 to 6.6 for age 46-55; and OR = 4.8, 95{\%} Cl 1.8 to 12.9 for age > 55), body mass index ≥ 25 kg/m2 (OR = 2.2, 95{\%} Cl 1.1 to 4.6), and frequent strenuous exercise (OR = 2.2, 95{\%} Cl 1.1 to 4.5) were significantly associated with higher prevalence of spondylolisthesis. There was a consistent likely exposure-response relation between professional seniority and ASL prevalence. Conclusions: Longitudinal studies are needed to confirm the observed association between professional driving and spondylolisthesis, and to examine further the specific occupational exposures accountable for this association.",
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AU - Christiani, D. C.

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N2 - Aims: To investigate the occupational and personal factors associated with lumbar spondylolisthesis in taxi drivers. Methods: Cross-sectional analysis of the baseline data from the Taxi Drivers' Health Study cohort. Information was retrieved from the medical records of standardised lumbosacral spine plain films, age, and anthropometric measures of 1242 subjects. Acquired spondylolisthesis (ASL) was defined as non-lytic spondylolisthesis involving lumbar spines above L5. Questionnaires were used to gather information on demographic features, health behaviours, exercise, work related physical and psychosocial factors, and driving time profiles. Multiple logistic regression was used to model the odds ratio (OR) for prevalent ASL cases associated with personal and occupational factors. Results: A total of 40 cases (3.2%) of ASL were diagnosed. Among those driving ≤ 5 years, 6-15 years, and > 15 years, the estimated prevalence of lumbar spondylolisthesis was 1.1%, 2.4%, and 7.1% respectively. Results of multiple logistic regression suggested that taxicab driving > 15 years (OR = 3.4, 95% Cl 1.1 to 10.7, compared to driving ≤ 5 years), age (OR = 2.6, 95% Cl 1.1 to 6.6 for age 46-55; and OR = 4.8, 95% Cl 1.8 to 12.9 for age > 55), body mass index ≥ 25 kg/m2 (OR = 2.2, 95% Cl 1.1 to 4.6), and frequent strenuous exercise (OR = 2.2, 95% Cl 1.1 to 4.5) were significantly associated with higher prevalence of spondylolisthesis. There was a consistent likely exposure-response relation between professional seniority and ASL prevalence. Conclusions: Longitudinal studies are needed to confirm the observed association between professional driving and spondylolisthesis, and to examine further the specific occupational exposures accountable for this association.

AB - Aims: To investigate the occupational and personal factors associated with lumbar spondylolisthesis in taxi drivers. Methods: Cross-sectional analysis of the baseline data from the Taxi Drivers' Health Study cohort. Information was retrieved from the medical records of standardised lumbosacral spine plain films, age, and anthropometric measures of 1242 subjects. Acquired spondylolisthesis (ASL) was defined as non-lytic spondylolisthesis involving lumbar spines above L5. Questionnaires were used to gather information on demographic features, health behaviours, exercise, work related physical and psychosocial factors, and driving time profiles. Multiple logistic regression was used to model the odds ratio (OR) for prevalent ASL cases associated with personal and occupational factors. Results: A total of 40 cases (3.2%) of ASL were diagnosed. Among those driving ≤ 5 years, 6-15 years, and > 15 years, the estimated prevalence of lumbar spondylolisthesis was 1.1%, 2.4%, and 7.1% respectively. Results of multiple logistic regression suggested that taxicab driving > 15 years (OR = 3.4, 95% Cl 1.1 to 10.7, compared to driving ≤ 5 years), age (OR = 2.6, 95% Cl 1.1 to 6.6 for age 46-55; and OR = 4.8, 95% Cl 1.8 to 12.9 for age > 55), body mass index ≥ 25 kg/m2 (OR = 2.2, 95% Cl 1.1 to 4.6), and frequent strenuous exercise (OR = 2.2, 95% Cl 1.1 to 4.5) were significantly associated with higher prevalence of spondylolisthesis. There was a consistent likely exposure-response relation between professional seniority and ASL prevalence. Conclusions: Longitudinal studies are needed to confirm the observed association between professional driving and spondylolisthesis, and to examine further the specific occupational exposures accountable for this association.

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