Is medical students' moral orientation changeable after preclinical medical education?

Chaou Shune Lin, Kuo Inn Tsou, Shu Ling Cho, Ming Shium Hsieh, Hsi Chin Wu, Chyi Her Lin

研究成果: 雜誌貢獻文章

2 引文 (Scopus)

摘要

Purpose: Moral orientation can affect ethical decision-making. Very few studies have focused on whether medical education can change the moral orientation of the students. The purpose of the present study was to document the types of moral orientation exhibited by medical students, and to study if their moral orientation was changed after preclinical education. Methods: From 2007 to 2009, the Mojac scale was used to measure the moral orientation of Taiwan medical students. The students included 271 first-year and 109 third-year students. They were rated as a communitarian, dual, or libertarian group and followed for 2 years to monitor the changes in their Mojac scores. Results: In both first and third-year students, the dual group after 2 years of preclinical medical education did not show any significant change. In the libertarian group, first and third-year students showed a statistically significant increase from a score of 99.4 and 101.3 to 103.0 and 105.7, respectively. In the communitarian group, first and third-year students showed a significant decline from 122.8 and 126.1 to 116.0 and 121.5, respectively. Conclusion: During the preclinical medical education years, students with communitarian orientation and libertarian orientation had changed in their moral orientation to become closer to dual orientation. These findings provide valuable hints to medical educators regarding bioethics education and the selection criteria of medical students for admission.
原文英語
頁(從 - 到)168-173
頁數6
期刊Journal of Medical Ethics
38
發行號3
DOIs
出版狀態已發佈 - 三月 2012

指紋

Medical Education
Medical Students
medical student
Students
education
student
Education
Bioethics
Group
Taiwan
Patient Selection
Decision Making
bioethics
educator
Communitarian
decision making

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Policy
  • Health(social science)
  • Issues, ethics and legal aspects
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

引用此文

Is medical students' moral orientation changeable after preclinical medical education? / Lin, Chaou Shune; Tsou, Kuo Inn; Cho, Shu Ling; Hsieh, Ming Shium; Wu, Hsi Chin; Lin, Chyi Her.

於: Journal of Medical Ethics, 卷 38, 編號 3, 03.2012, p. 168-173.

研究成果: 雜誌貢獻文章

Lin, Chaou Shune ; Tsou, Kuo Inn ; Cho, Shu Ling ; Hsieh, Ming Shium ; Wu, Hsi Chin ; Lin, Chyi Her. / Is medical students' moral orientation changeable after preclinical medical education?. 於: Journal of Medical Ethics. 2012 ; 卷 38, 編號 3. 頁 168-173.
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