Is frying oil a dietary source of an endocrine disruptor? Anti-estrogenic effects of polar compounds from frying oil in rats

Yu Shun Lin, Shui Yuan Lu, Hai Ping Wu, Chi Fen Chang, Yung Tsung Chiu, Hui Ting Yang, Pei Min Chao

研究成果: 雜誌貢獻文章

摘要

The objective was to investigate endocrine-disrupting effects of polar compounds from oxidized frying oil. Estrogenicity of polar compounds was tested with a rat uterotrophic bioassay. Dietary oxidized frying oil (containing 51% polar compounds) or polar compounds isolated from it were incorporated into feed (in lieu of fresh soybean oil) and fed to ovariectomized rats, with or without treatment with exogenous ethynyl estradiol. Exogenous estrogen restored uterine weight, and caused histological abnormalities (stratified epithelia and conglomerate glands) as well as proliferation of uterine epithelial cells. However, tamoxifen or polar compounds reduced these effects. Furthermore, tamoxifen or polar compounds down-regulated uterine mRNA expression of estrogen receptor (ER)-target genes, implicating reduced ER activity in this hypo-uterotrophic effect. Inhibition of ER signaling and mitosis by polar compounds were attributed to reduced MAPK and AKT activation, as well as a reduced ligand binding domain-transactivity of ERα/β. We concluded polar compounds from frying oil are potential endocrine-disrupting chemicals, with implications for food and environmental safety.
原文英語
頁(從 - 到)18-27
頁數10
期刊Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety
169
DOIs
出版狀態已發佈 - 三月 1 2019
對外發佈Yes

指紋

Unsaturated Dietary Fats
Endocrine Disruptors
Estrogen Receptors
Rats
Estrogens
Oils
Tamoxifen
Soybean Oil
Ethinyl Estradiol
Food Safety
Soybean oil
Mitosis
Biological Assay
Bioassay
Epithelium
Epithelial Cells
Ligands
Weights and Measures
Messenger RNA
Genes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pollution
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

引用此文

Is frying oil a dietary source of an endocrine disruptor? Anti-estrogenic effects of polar compounds from frying oil in rats. / Lin, Yu Shun; Lu, Shui Yuan; Wu, Hai Ping; Chang, Chi Fen; Chiu, Yung Tsung; Yang, Hui Ting; Chao, Pei Min.

於: Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety, 卷 169, 01.03.2019, p. 18-27.

研究成果: 雜誌貢獻文章

Lin, Yu Shun ; Lu, Shui Yuan ; Wu, Hai Ping ; Chang, Chi Fen ; Chiu, Yung Tsung ; Yang, Hui Ting ; Chao, Pei Min. / Is frying oil a dietary source of an endocrine disruptor? Anti-estrogenic effects of polar compounds from frying oil in rats. 於: Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety. 2019 ; 卷 169. 頁 18-27.
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