Invasive group G streptococcal infections: A review of 37 cases

C. E. Liu, T. N. Jang, F. D. Wang, L. S. Wang, C. Y. Liu

研究成果: 雜誌貢獻文章

15 引文 (Scopus)

摘要

Background. Beta-hemolytic streptococci group A, B, and D which cause many diseases have been well studied. Infection caused by group G Streptococcus has increased in clinical significance, and thus is attracting more physicians' attention. This retrospective analysis reports clinical experience with such infections at the Veterans General Hospital-Taipei. Methods. Medical records of invasive Group G streptococcal isolates from March 1991 to April 1994 were reviewed. Thirty-seven cases were included. Results. There were 33 males and 4 females with a mean age of 67.4. Major underlying diseases included diabetes (24.3%), cardiovascular diseases (21.6%), malignancy (21.6%), bone or joint diseases (18.9%) and cirrhosis of the liver (13.5%). Only 8.1% cases had no underlying disease. The most common portal of entry was the skin (64.9%). There was a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations, including cellulitis (32.4%), arthritis or osteomyelitis (16.2%), endocarditis (8.1%), meningitis (8.1%), peritonitis (8.1%), empyema (5.4%) and primary bacteremia (27%). All of these isolates were susceptible to penicillin, oxacillin, cefazolin, clindamycin and vancomycin. Ten patients died, and five of these expired from group G streptococcal infections. Conclusions. Group G Streptococcus is a low virulent microorganism. Clinical improvement after therapy is fast. Poor response to antibiotics should prompt investigation of the underlying diseases or undrained foci of infection.

原文英語
頁(從 - 到)173-178
頁數6
期刊Chinese Medical Journal (Taipei)
56
發行號3
出版狀態已發佈 - 1995
對外發佈Yes

指紋

Streptococcal Infections
Streptococcus
Infection
Veterans Hospitals
Cefazolin
Oxacillin
Empyema
Streptococcus agalactiae
Cellulitis
Clindamycin
Joint Diseases
Enterococcus faecalis
Streptococcus pyogenes
Bone Diseases
Osteomyelitis
Vancomycin
Bacteremia
Endocarditis
Peritonitis
Meningitis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

引用此文

Liu, C. E., Jang, T. N., Wang, F. D., Wang, L. S., & Liu, C. Y. (1995). Invasive group G streptococcal infections: A review of 37 cases. Chinese Medical Journal (Taipei), 56(3), 173-178.

Invasive group G streptococcal infections : A review of 37 cases. / Liu, C. E.; Jang, T. N.; Wang, F. D.; Wang, L. S.; Liu, C. Y.

於: Chinese Medical Journal (Taipei), 卷 56, 編號 3, 1995, p. 173-178.

研究成果: 雜誌貢獻文章

Liu, CE, Jang, TN, Wang, FD, Wang, LS & Liu, CY 1995, 'Invasive group G streptococcal infections: A review of 37 cases', Chinese Medical Journal (Taipei), 卷 56, 編號 3, 頁 173-178.
Liu CE, Jang TN, Wang FD, Wang LS, Liu CY. Invasive group G streptococcal infections: A review of 37 cases. Chinese Medical Journal (Taipei). 1995;56(3):173-178.
Liu, C. E. ; Jang, T. N. ; Wang, F. D. ; Wang, L. S. ; Liu, C. Y. / Invasive group G streptococcal infections : A review of 37 cases. 於: Chinese Medical Journal (Taipei). 1995 ; 卷 56, 編號 3. 頁 173-178.
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abstract = "Background. Beta-hemolytic streptococci group A, B, and D which cause many diseases have been well studied. Infection caused by group G Streptococcus has increased in clinical significance, and thus is attracting more physicians' attention. This retrospective analysis reports clinical experience with such infections at the Veterans General Hospital-Taipei. Methods. Medical records of invasive Group G streptococcal isolates from March 1991 to April 1994 were reviewed. Thirty-seven cases were included. Results. There were 33 males and 4 females with a mean age of 67.4. Major underlying diseases included diabetes (24.3{\%}), cardiovascular diseases (21.6{\%}), malignancy (21.6{\%}), bone or joint diseases (18.9{\%}) and cirrhosis of the liver (13.5{\%}). Only 8.1{\%} cases had no underlying disease. The most common portal of entry was the skin (64.9{\%}). There was a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations, including cellulitis (32.4{\%}), arthritis or osteomyelitis (16.2{\%}), endocarditis (8.1{\%}), meningitis (8.1{\%}), peritonitis (8.1{\%}), empyema (5.4{\%}) and primary bacteremia (27{\%}). All of these isolates were susceptible to penicillin, oxacillin, cefazolin, clindamycin and vancomycin. Ten patients died, and five of these expired from group G streptococcal infections. Conclusions. Group G Streptococcus is a low virulent microorganism. Clinical improvement after therapy is fast. Poor response to antibiotics should prompt investigation of the underlying diseases or undrained foci of infection.",
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