Hypokalaemia and paralysis

S. H. Lin, Y. F. Lin, M. L. Halperin

研究成果: 雜誌貢獻文章

115 引文 (Scopus)

摘要

It is not uncommon for patients to present to the emergency room with severe weakness and a markedly low plasma potassium concentration. We attempted to identify useful clues to the diagnosis of hypokalaemic periodic paralysis (HPP), because its acute treatment aims are unique. We retrospectively reviewed charts over a 10-year period: HPP was the initial diagnosis in 97 patients. Mean patient age was 29 ± 1.1 and the male:female ratio was 77:20. When the final diagnosis was HPP (n=73), the acid-base state was normal, the urine K+ concentration was low, and the transtubular K+ concentration gradient (TTKG) was + excretion in the presence of hypokalaemia, and a TTKG of close to 7. With respect to therapy, much less K+ was given to patients with HPP, yet 1:3 subsequently had a plasma K+ concentration that eventually exceeded 5.0 mmol/l. Using plasma acid-base status, phosphate and K+ excretion parameters allows a presumptive diagnosis of HPP with more confidence in the emergency room.

原文英語
頁(從 - 到)133-139
頁數7
期刊QJM
94
發行號3
出版狀態已發佈 - 2001
對外發佈Yes

指紋

Hypokalemic Periodic Paralysis
Hypokalemia
Paralysis
Hospital Emergency Service
Acids
Potassium
Phosphates
Urine
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

引用此文

Lin, S. H., Lin, Y. F., & Halperin, M. L. (2001). Hypokalaemia and paralysis. QJM, 94(3), 133-139.

Hypokalaemia and paralysis. / Lin, S. H.; Lin, Y. F.; Halperin, M. L.

於: QJM, 卷 94, 編號 3, 2001, p. 133-139.

研究成果: 雜誌貢獻文章

Lin, SH, Lin, YF & Halperin, ML 2001, 'Hypokalaemia and paralysis', QJM, 卷 94, 編號 3, 頁 133-139.
Lin SH, Lin YF, Halperin ML. Hypokalaemia and paralysis. QJM. 2001;94(3):133-139.
Lin, S. H. ; Lin, Y. F. ; Halperin, M. L. / Hypokalaemia and paralysis. 於: QJM. 2001 ; 卷 94, 編號 3. 頁 133-139.
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