Gout Can Increase the Risk of Receiving Rotator Cuff Tear Repair Surgery

研究成果: 雜誌貢獻文章

2 引文 (Scopus)

摘要

Background: Gout commonly involves joint inflammation, and clinical epidemiological studies on involved tendons are scant. Rotator cuff tears are the most common cause of shoulder disability, and surgery is one of the choices often adopted to regain previous function. Purpose: To investigate the risk of receiving rotator cuff repair surgery among patients with gout and to analyze possible risk factors to design an effective prevention strategy. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: The authors studied a 7-year longitudinal follow-up of patients from the Taiwan Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2005 (LHID2005). This included a cohort of patients who received a diagnosis of gout during 2004-2008 (gout cohort) and a cohort matched by propensity scores (control cohort). A 2-stage approach that used the National Health Interview Survey 2005 was used to obtain missing confounding variables from the LHID2005. The crude hazard ratio (HR) and adjusted HR were estimated between the gout and control cohorts. Results: The gout and control cohorts comprised 32,723 patients with gout and 65,446 people matched at a ratio of 1:2. The incidence of rotator cuff repair was 31 and 18 per 100,000 person-years in the gout and control cohorts, respectively. The crude HR for rotator cuff repair in the gout cohort was 1.73 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.23-2.44; P <.01) during the 7-year follow-up period. After adjustment for covariates by use of the 2-stage approach, the propensity score calibration-adjusted HR was 1.60 (95% CI, 1.12-2.29; P <.01) in the gout cohort. Further analysis revealed that the adjusted HR was 1.73 (95% CI, 1.20-2.50; P <.001) among patients with gout who did not take hypouricemic medication and 2.70 (95% CI, 1.31-5.59; P <.01) for patients with gout aged 50 years or younger. Conclusion: Patients with gout, particularly those aged 50 years or younger and without hypouricemic medication control, are at a relatively higher risk of receiving rotator cuff repair surgery. Strict control of uric acid levels with hypouricemic medication may effectively reduce the risk of rotator cuff repair.
原文英語
頁(從 - 到)2355-2363
頁數9
期刊American Journal of Sports Medicine
45
發行號10
DOIs
出版狀態已發佈 - 八月 1 2017

指紋

Gout
Rotator Cuff
Confidence Intervals
Propensity Score
Health Insurance
Rotator Cuff Injuries
Databases
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Health Surveys
Uric Acid
Taiwan
Tendons
Calibration
Epidemiologic Studies
Cohort Studies
Joints

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

引用此文

@article{d80c1968f49e4308bc4864855f21ee23,
title = "Gout Can Increase the Risk of Receiving Rotator Cuff Tear Repair Surgery",
abstract = "Background: Gout commonly involves joint inflammation, and clinical epidemiological studies on involved tendons are scant. Rotator cuff tears are the most common cause of shoulder disability, and surgery is one of the choices often adopted to regain previous function. Purpose: To investigate the risk of receiving rotator cuff repair surgery among patients with gout and to analyze possible risk factors to design an effective prevention strategy. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: The authors studied a 7-year longitudinal follow-up of patients from the Taiwan Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2005 (LHID2005). This included a cohort of patients who received a diagnosis of gout during 2004-2008 (gout cohort) and a cohort matched by propensity scores (control cohort). A 2-stage approach that used the National Health Interview Survey 2005 was used to obtain missing confounding variables from the LHID2005. The crude hazard ratio (HR) and adjusted HR were estimated between the gout and control cohorts. Results: The gout and control cohorts comprised 32,723 patients with gout and 65,446 people matched at a ratio of 1:2. The incidence of rotator cuff repair was 31 and 18 per 100,000 person-years in the gout and control cohorts, respectively. The crude HR for rotator cuff repair in the gout cohort was 1.73 (95{\%} confidence interval [CI], 1.23-2.44; P <.01) during the 7-year follow-up period. After adjustment for covariates by use of the 2-stage approach, the propensity score calibration-adjusted HR was 1.60 (95{\%} CI, 1.12-2.29; P <.01) in the gout cohort. Further analysis revealed that the adjusted HR was 1.73 (95{\%} CI, 1.20-2.50; P <.001) among patients with gout who did not take hypouricemic medication and 2.70 (95{\%} CI, 1.31-5.59; P <.01) for patients with gout aged 50 years or younger. Conclusion: Patients with gout, particularly those aged 50 years or younger and without hypouricemic medication control, are at a relatively higher risk of receiving rotator cuff repair surgery. Strict control of uric acid levels with hypouricemic medication may effectively reduce the risk of rotator cuff repair.",
keywords = "gout, population-based study, rotator cuff tear, shoulder, surgical repair",
author = "Huang, {Shih Wei} and Wu, {Chin Wen} and Lin, {Li Fong} and Liou, {Tsan Hon} and Lin, {Hui Wen}",
year = "2017",
month = "8",
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doi = "10.1177/0363546517704843",
language = "English",
volume = "45",
pages = "2355--2363",
journal = "American Journal of Sports Medicine",
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number = "10",

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TY - JOUR

T1 - Gout Can Increase the Risk of Receiving Rotator Cuff Tear Repair Surgery

AU - Huang, Shih Wei

AU - Wu, Chin Wen

AU - Lin, Li Fong

AU - Liou, Tsan Hon

AU - Lin, Hui Wen

PY - 2017/8/1

Y1 - 2017/8/1

N2 - Background: Gout commonly involves joint inflammation, and clinical epidemiological studies on involved tendons are scant. Rotator cuff tears are the most common cause of shoulder disability, and surgery is one of the choices often adopted to regain previous function. Purpose: To investigate the risk of receiving rotator cuff repair surgery among patients with gout and to analyze possible risk factors to design an effective prevention strategy. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: The authors studied a 7-year longitudinal follow-up of patients from the Taiwan Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2005 (LHID2005). This included a cohort of patients who received a diagnosis of gout during 2004-2008 (gout cohort) and a cohort matched by propensity scores (control cohort). A 2-stage approach that used the National Health Interview Survey 2005 was used to obtain missing confounding variables from the LHID2005. The crude hazard ratio (HR) and adjusted HR were estimated between the gout and control cohorts. Results: The gout and control cohorts comprised 32,723 patients with gout and 65,446 people matched at a ratio of 1:2. The incidence of rotator cuff repair was 31 and 18 per 100,000 person-years in the gout and control cohorts, respectively. The crude HR for rotator cuff repair in the gout cohort was 1.73 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.23-2.44; P <.01) during the 7-year follow-up period. After adjustment for covariates by use of the 2-stage approach, the propensity score calibration-adjusted HR was 1.60 (95% CI, 1.12-2.29; P <.01) in the gout cohort. Further analysis revealed that the adjusted HR was 1.73 (95% CI, 1.20-2.50; P <.001) among patients with gout who did not take hypouricemic medication and 2.70 (95% CI, 1.31-5.59; P <.01) for patients with gout aged 50 years or younger. Conclusion: Patients with gout, particularly those aged 50 years or younger and without hypouricemic medication control, are at a relatively higher risk of receiving rotator cuff repair surgery. Strict control of uric acid levels with hypouricemic medication may effectively reduce the risk of rotator cuff repair.

AB - Background: Gout commonly involves joint inflammation, and clinical epidemiological studies on involved tendons are scant. Rotator cuff tears are the most common cause of shoulder disability, and surgery is one of the choices often adopted to regain previous function. Purpose: To investigate the risk of receiving rotator cuff repair surgery among patients with gout and to analyze possible risk factors to design an effective prevention strategy. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: The authors studied a 7-year longitudinal follow-up of patients from the Taiwan Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2005 (LHID2005). This included a cohort of patients who received a diagnosis of gout during 2004-2008 (gout cohort) and a cohort matched by propensity scores (control cohort). A 2-stage approach that used the National Health Interview Survey 2005 was used to obtain missing confounding variables from the LHID2005. The crude hazard ratio (HR) and adjusted HR were estimated between the gout and control cohorts. Results: The gout and control cohorts comprised 32,723 patients with gout and 65,446 people matched at a ratio of 1:2. The incidence of rotator cuff repair was 31 and 18 per 100,000 person-years in the gout and control cohorts, respectively. The crude HR for rotator cuff repair in the gout cohort was 1.73 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.23-2.44; P <.01) during the 7-year follow-up period. After adjustment for covariates by use of the 2-stage approach, the propensity score calibration-adjusted HR was 1.60 (95% CI, 1.12-2.29; P <.01) in the gout cohort. Further analysis revealed that the adjusted HR was 1.73 (95% CI, 1.20-2.50; P <.001) among patients with gout who did not take hypouricemic medication and 2.70 (95% CI, 1.31-5.59; P <.01) for patients with gout aged 50 years or younger. Conclusion: Patients with gout, particularly those aged 50 years or younger and without hypouricemic medication control, are at a relatively higher risk of receiving rotator cuff repair surgery. Strict control of uric acid levels with hypouricemic medication may effectively reduce the risk of rotator cuff repair.

KW - gout

KW - population-based study

KW - rotator cuff tear

KW - shoulder

KW - surgical repair

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