Factors associated with the use of St. John's wort among adults with depressive symptoms

Chung Hsuen Wu, Kennedy Jae, David A. Sclar

研究成果: 雜誌貢獻文章

1 引文 (Scopus)

摘要

Objective. To examine the association between access to conventional health care and the use of St. John's wort among adults who report depressive symptoms. Study Design. Logistic secondary analysis of the Complementary and Alternative Medicine Supplement to the 2002 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS). Study Population. Adults who report depressive symptoms and used St. John's wort (n = 246) were compared to nonusers with depressive symptoms (n = 5,111). Results. After controlling for various sociodemographic and socioeconomic factors, depressed adults who could not afford needed medical care due to cost were nearly two times (AOR 1.92, 95% CI 1.38-2.67) more likely to use St. John's wort than those who could afford conventional medical care. Higher income, education, and health status were also positively associated with the use of St. John's wort. Conclusion. The growing use of complementary and alternative therapies in the US is widely interpreted as evidence of changing consumer tastes and dissatisfaction with conventional medical treatment for chronic conditions like depression. However, the rising costs of conventional therapies and diminishing access to health insurance may also play a role.

原文英語
頁(從 - 到)341-348
頁數8
期刊Journal of Dietary Supplements
5
發行號4
DOIs
出版狀態已發佈 - 2008
對外發佈Yes

指紋

Hypericum
alternative medicine
Complementary Therapies
signs and symptoms (animals and humans)
Depression
health insurance
Costs and Cost Analysis
Health Services Accessibility
socioeconomic factors
medical treatment
Health Insurance
Health Surveys
health status
health services
Health Status
interviews
education
income
experimental design
Interviews

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Nutrition and Dietetics
  • Pharmacology (medical)

引用此文

Factors associated with the use of St. John's wort among adults with depressive symptoms. / Wu, Chung Hsuen; Jae, Kennedy; Sclar, David A.

於: Journal of Dietary Supplements, 卷 5, 編號 4, 2008, p. 341-348.

研究成果: 雜誌貢獻文章

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