Effectiveness of different types of motorcycle helmets and effects of their improper use on head injuries

Wen Yu Yu, Chih Yi Chen, Wen Ta Chiu, Mau Roung Lin

研究成果: 雜誌貢獻文章

52 引文 (Scopus)

摘要

Background: Differences among three helmet types and the ineffectiveness of improper helmet use in preventing head injuries are speculated about but are seldom explored with evidence. A case-control study was conducted to examine how different helmet types and improper helmet use affected protection against head injuries among motorcyclists in Taiwan. Methods: Case motorcyclists comprised 435 persons who sought emergency care due to head injuries at a medical centre in west-central Taiwan over an 8-month period and 23 motorcyclists who died from head injuries at the scene of the crash; 458 motorcyclists who had non-head injuries were used as the control group, and their crashes occurred within 1 hour earlier or later than the corresponding cases. Information on helmet type was validated by interviewing motorcyclists who were refuelling at petrol stations. Results: A conditional logistic regression analysis showed that compared with helmeted motorcyclists, non-helmeted motorcyclists were more than four times as likely to have head injuries [odds ratio (OR) 4.54; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.25-16.5] and ten times as likely to have brain injuries (OR 10.4; 95% CI 1.82-59.2). Compared with motorcyclists wearing full-face helmets, those wearing halfcoverage helmets were more than twice as likely to have head injuries (OR 2.57; 95% CI 1.50-4.40) and brain injuries (OR 2.10; 95% CI 1.01-4.38). Compared with motorcyclists with firmly fastened helmets, those with loosely fastened helmets increased their risk of head injury (OR 1.94; 95% CI 1.33-2.82) and were more than twice as likely to have brain injuries (OR 2.50; 95% CI 1.47-4.25). Conclusions: Of the three helmet types, half-coverage helmets provided motorcyclists the least protection from head injuries. Furthermore, wearing a loosely fastened helmet may compromise any potential protection. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Epidemiological Association.

原文英語
文章編號dyr040
頁(從 - 到)794-803
頁數10
期刊International Journal of Epidemiology
40
發行號3
DOIs
出版狀態已發佈 - 六月 2011

指紋

Motorcycles
Head Protective Devices
Craniocerebral Trauma
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Brain Injuries
Taiwan
Emergency Medical Services
Case-Control Studies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology

引用此文

Effectiveness of different types of motorcycle helmets and effects of their improper use on head injuries. / Yu, Wen Yu; Chen, Chih Yi; Chiu, Wen Ta; Lin, Mau Roung.

於: International Journal of Epidemiology, 卷 40, 編號 3, dyr040, 06.2011, p. 794-803.

研究成果: 雜誌貢獻文章

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title = "Effectiveness of different types of motorcycle helmets and effects of their improper use on head injuries",
abstract = "Background: Differences among three helmet types and the ineffectiveness of improper helmet use in preventing head injuries are speculated about but are seldom explored with evidence. A case-control study was conducted to examine how different helmet types and improper helmet use affected protection against head injuries among motorcyclists in Taiwan. Methods: Case motorcyclists comprised 435 persons who sought emergency care due to head injuries at a medical centre in west-central Taiwan over an 8-month period and 23 motorcyclists who died from head injuries at the scene of the crash; 458 motorcyclists who had non-head injuries were used as the control group, and their crashes occurred within 1 hour earlier or later than the corresponding cases. Information on helmet type was validated by interviewing motorcyclists who were refuelling at petrol stations. Results: A conditional logistic regression analysis showed that compared with helmeted motorcyclists, non-helmeted motorcyclists were more than four times as likely to have head injuries [odds ratio (OR) 4.54; 95{\%} confidence interval (CI) 1.25-16.5] and ten times as likely to have brain injuries (OR 10.4; 95{\%} CI 1.82-59.2). Compared with motorcyclists wearing full-face helmets, those wearing halfcoverage helmets were more than twice as likely to have head injuries (OR 2.57; 95{\%} CI 1.50-4.40) and brain injuries (OR 2.10; 95{\%} CI 1.01-4.38). Compared with motorcyclists with firmly fastened helmets, those with loosely fastened helmets increased their risk of head injury (OR 1.94; 95{\%} CI 1.33-2.82) and were more than twice as likely to have brain injuries (OR 2.50; 95{\%} CI 1.47-4.25). Conclusions: Of the three helmet types, half-coverage helmets provided motorcyclists the least protection from head injuries. Furthermore, wearing a loosely fastened helmet may compromise any potential protection. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Epidemiological Association.",
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AB - Background: Differences among three helmet types and the ineffectiveness of improper helmet use in preventing head injuries are speculated about but are seldom explored with evidence. A case-control study was conducted to examine how different helmet types and improper helmet use affected protection against head injuries among motorcyclists in Taiwan. Methods: Case motorcyclists comprised 435 persons who sought emergency care due to head injuries at a medical centre in west-central Taiwan over an 8-month period and 23 motorcyclists who died from head injuries at the scene of the crash; 458 motorcyclists who had non-head injuries were used as the control group, and their crashes occurred within 1 hour earlier or later than the corresponding cases. Information on helmet type was validated by interviewing motorcyclists who were refuelling at petrol stations. Results: A conditional logistic regression analysis showed that compared with helmeted motorcyclists, non-helmeted motorcyclists were more than four times as likely to have head injuries [odds ratio (OR) 4.54; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.25-16.5] and ten times as likely to have brain injuries (OR 10.4; 95% CI 1.82-59.2). Compared with motorcyclists wearing full-face helmets, those wearing halfcoverage helmets were more than twice as likely to have head injuries (OR 2.57; 95% CI 1.50-4.40) and brain injuries (OR 2.10; 95% CI 1.01-4.38). Compared with motorcyclists with firmly fastened helmets, those with loosely fastened helmets increased their risk of head injury (OR 1.94; 95% CI 1.33-2.82) and were more than twice as likely to have brain injuries (OR 2.50; 95% CI 1.47-4.25). Conclusions: Of the three helmet types, half-coverage helmets provided motorcyclists the least protection from head injuries. Furthermore, wearing a loosely fastened helmet may compromise any potential protection. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Epidemiological Association.

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KW - Crash severity

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KW - Head injury

KW - Helmet

KW - Motorcycle

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