Effect of weather and time on trauma events determined using emergency medical service registry data

Li Wei Lin, Hsiao Yu Lin, Chien-Yeh Hsu, Hsiao Hsien Rau, Ping Ling Chen

研究成果: 雜誌貢獻文章

11 引文 (Scopus)

摘要

Introduction Trauma admissions are associated with weather and temporal factors; however, previous study results regarding these factors are contradictory. We hypothesised that weather and temporal factors have different effects on specific trauma events in an emergency medical service (EMS) system. Methods EMS data from January 1, 2009, to December 31, 2010, were obtained from the fire department of Taipei City and associated with the local weather data. EMS trauma events were categorised into total trauma, traffic accidents (TAs), motorbike accidents (MBAs), and falls. Hourly data on trauma patients were analysed using the zero-inflated Poisson model. Results The hourly incidence of total trauma increased with the magnitude of precipitation (incidence rate ratio [IRR] = 1.06, 1.09, and 1.11 in light, moderate, and heavy rain, respectively), and this effect was more prominent in fall patients than in patients with other injuries (IRR = 1.07, 1.21, and 1.32). However, the hourly incidence of TAs and MBAs was associated only with light rain (IRR = 1.11 and 1.06, respectively). An hour of sunshine exposure was associated with an increase in the hourly incidence of all groups, and higher temperatures were associated with an increased hourly incidence of total trauma, TAs, and MBAs, but not falls. The hourly incidence of falls increased only in late fall and winter. Compared with the hourly incidence between 3 am and 7 am, the hourly incidence of all groups plateaued between 7 am and 11 pm and declined from 11 pm to 3 am. During the plateau period, 2 peaks in the incidence of TAs (IRR = 5.03 and 5.07, respectively) and MBAs (IRR = 5.81 and 5.51, respectively) were observed during 7-11 am and 3-7 pm. The hourly incidence of total trauma, TAs, and MBAs plateaued during workdays, peaked on Fridays, declined on Saturdays, and troughed on Sundays. The incidence of falls increased only on Mondays (IRR = 1.09). Conclusions Weather and temporal factors had different impacts on the incidence of traffic-related accidents and falls. Therefore, EMS data may have implications in preventing injuries and planning resource use for prehospital trauma rescue.

原文英語
頁(從 - 到)1814-1820
頁數7
期刊Injury
46
發行號9
DOIs
出版狀態已發佈 - 九月 1 2015

指紋

Weather
Emergency Medical Services
Registries
Incidence
Wounds and Injuries
Off-Road Motor Vehicles
Traffic Accidents
Accidents
Rain
Sunlight

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Emergency Medicine
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

引用此文

Effect of weather and time on trauma events determined using emergency medical service registry data. / Lin, Li Wei; Lin, Hsiao Yu; Hsu, Chien-Yeh; Rau, Hsiao Hsien; Chen, Ping Ling.

於: Injury, 卷 46, 編號 9, 01.09.2015, p. 1814-1820.

研究成果: 雜誌貢獻文章

Lin, Li Wei ; Lin, Hsiao Yu ; Hsu, Chien-Yeh ; Rau, Hsiao Hsien ; Chen, Ping Ling. / Effect of weather and time on trauma events determined using emergency medical service registry data. 於: Injury. 2015 ; 卷 46, 編號 9. 頁 1814-1820.
@article{a26547bb88dd41539f282973ec7a5507,
title = "Effect of weather and time on trauma events determined using emergency medical service registry data",
abstract = "Introduction Trauma admissions are associated with weather and temporal factors; however, previous study results regarding these factors are contradictory. We hypothesised that weather and temporal factors have different effects on specific trauma events in an emergency medical service (EMS) system. Methods EMS data from January 1, 2009, to December 31, 2010, were obtained from the fire department of Taipei City and associated with the local weather data. EMS trauma events were categorised into total trauma, traffic accidents (TAs), motorbike accidents (MBAs), and falls. Hourly data on trauma patients were analysed using the zero-inflated Poisson model. Results The hourly incidence of total trauma increased with the magnitude of precipitation (incidence rate ratio [IRR] = 1.06, 1.09, and 1.11 in light, moderate, and heavy rain, respectively), and this effect was more prominent in fall patients than in patients with other injuries (IRR = 1.07, 1.21, and 1.32). However, the hourly incidence of TAs and MBAs was associated only with light rain (IRR = 1.11 and 1.06, respectively). An hour of sunshine exposure was associated with an increase in the hourly incidence of all groups, and higher temperatures were associated with an increased hourly incidence of total trauma, TAs, and MBAs, but not falls. The hourly incidence of falls increased only in late fall and winter. Compared with the hourly incidence between 3 am and 7 am, the hourly incidence of all groups plateaued between 7 am and 11 pm and declined from 11 pm to 3 am. During the plateau period, 2 peaks in the incidence of TAs (IRR = 5.03 and 5.07, respectively) and MBAs (IRR = 5.81 and 5.51, respectively) were observed during 7-11 am and 3-7 pm. The hourly incidence of total trauma, TAs, and MBAs plateaued during workdays, peaked on Fridays, declined on Saturdays, and troughed on Sundays. The incidence of falls increased only on Mondays (IRR = 1.09). Conclusions Weather and temporal factors had different impacts on the incidence of traffic-related accidents and falls. Therefore, EMS data may have implications in preventing injuries and planning resource use for prehospital trauma rescue.",
keywords = "Emergency medical service (EMS), Time, Trauma, Weather",
author = "Lin, {Li Wei} and Lin, {Hsiao Yu} and Chien-Yeh Hsu and Rau, {Hsiao Hsien} and Chen, {Ping Ling}",
year = "2015",
month = "9",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.injury.2015.02.026",
language = "English",
volume = "46",
pages = "1814--1820",
journal = "Injury",
issn = "0020-1383",
publisher = "Elsevier Limited",
number = "9",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effect of weather and time on trauma events determined using emergency medical service registry data

AU - Lin, Li Wei

AU - Lin, Hsiao Yu

AU - Hsu, Chien-Yeh

AU - Rau, Hsiao Hsien

AU - Chen, Ping Ling

PY - 2015/9/1

Y1 - 2015/9/1

N2 - Introduction Trauma admissions are associated with weather and temporal factors; however, previous study results regarding these factors are contradictory. We hypothesised that weather and temporal factors have different effects on specific trauma events in an emergency medical service (EMS) system. Methods EMS data from January 1, 2009, to December 31, 2010, were obtained from the fire department of Taipei City and associated with the local weather data. EMS trauma events were categorised into total trauma, traffic accidents (TAs), motorbike accidents (MBAs), and falls. Hourly data on trauma patients were analysed using the zero-inflated Poisson model. Results The hourly incidence of total trauma increased with the magnitude of precipitation (incidence rate ratio [IRR] = 1.06, 1.09, and 1.11 in light, moderate, and heavy rain, respectively), and this effect was more prominent in fall patients than in patients with other injuries (IRR = 1.07, 1.21, and 1.32). However, the hourly incidence of TAs and MBAs was associated only with light rain (IRR = 1.11 and 1.06, respectively). An hour of sunshine exposure was associated with an increase in the hourly incidence of all groups, and higher temperatures were associated with an increased hourly incidence of total trauma, TAs, and MBAs, but not falls. The hourly incidence of falls increased only in late fall and winter. Compared with the hourly incidence between 3 am and 7 am, the hourly incidence of all groups plateaued between 7 am and 11 pm and declined from 11 pm to 3 am. During the plateau period, 2 peaks in the incidence of TAs (IRR = 5.03 and 5.07, respectively) and MBAs (IRR = 5.81 and 5.51, respectively) were observed during 7-11 am and 3-7 pm. The hourly incidence of total trauma, TAs, and MBAs plateaued during workdays, peaked on Fridays, declined on Saturdays, and troughed on Sundays. The incidence of falls increased only on Mondays (IRR = 1.09). Conclusions Weather and temporal factors had different impacts on the incidence of traffic-related accidents and falls. Therefore, EMS data may have implications in preventing injuries and planning resource use for prehospital trauma rescue.

AB - Introduction Trauma admissions are associated with weather and temporal factors; however, previous study results regarding these factors are contradictory. We hypothesised that weather and temporal factors have different effects on specific trauma events in an emergency medical service (EMS) system. Methods EMS data from January 1, 2009, to December 31, 2010, were obtained from the fire department of Taipei City and associated with the local weather data. EMS trauma events were categorised into total trauma, traffic accidents (TAs), motorbike accidents (MBAs), and falls. Hourly data on trauma patients were analysed using the zero-inflated Poisson model. Results The hourly incidence of total trauma increased with the magnitude of precipitation (incidence rate ratio [IRR] = 1.06, 1.09, and 1.11 in light, moderate, and heavy rain, respectively), and this effect was more prominent in fall patients than in patients with other injuries (IRR = 1.07, 1.21, and 1.32). However, the hourly incidence of TAs and MBAs was associated only with light rain (IRR = 1.11 and 1.06, respectively). An hour of sunshine exposure was associated with an increase in the hourly incidence of all groups, and higher temperatures were associated with an increased hourly incidence of total trauma, TAs, and MBAs, but not falls. The hourly incidence of falls increased only in late fall and winter. Compared with the hourly incidence between 3 am and 7 am, the hourly incidence of all groups plateaued between 7 am and 11 pm and declined from 11 pm to 3 am. During the plateau period, 2 peaks in the incidence of TAs (IRR = 5.03 and 5.07, respectively) and MBAs (IRR = 5.81 and 5.51, respectively) were observed during 7-11 am and 3-7 pm. The hourly incidence of total trauma, TAs, and MBAs plateaued during workdays, peaked on Fridays, declined on Saturdays, and troughed on Sundays. The incidence of falls increased only on Mondays (IRR = 1.09). Conclusions Weather and temporal factors had different impacts on the incidence of traffic-related accidents and falls. Therefore, EMS data may have implications in preventing injuries and planning resource use for prehospital trauma rescue.

KW - Emergency medical service (EMS)

KW - Time

KW - Trauma

KW - Weather

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84939565376&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84939565376&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.injury.2015.02.026

DO - 10.1016/j.injury.2015.02.026

M3 - Article

C2 - 25818056

AN - SCOPUS:84939565376

VL - 46

SP - 1814

EP - 1820

JO - Injury

JF - Injury

SN - 0020-1383

IS - 9

ER -