Effect of indoor environmental quality on building-related symptoms among the residents of apartment-type buildings in Bangkok area

Tanachai Nitmetawong, Supichaya Boonvisut, Kraiwuth Kallawicha, Hsing Chao

研究成果: 雜誌貢獻文章

摘要

This study investigated the associations between residential characteristics and building-related symptoms (BRSs). Individuals who resided in an apartment-type building in the Bangkok area were recruited. Residential characteristics, activities, and BRSs were assessed using questionnaires. Airborne fungi were collected using an electrostatic dust collector. In total, 93 questionnaires and dust samples were returned to the laboratory. The most prevalent BRSs that the participants reported were sneezing, followed by fatigue and headache. The results of multiple logistic regression analyses showed the participants who seldom used hairstyling products had more general symptoms than those who never used them (OR = 4.35; 95% CI = 1.00, 18.96). Moreover, the operating hours of an air conditioner or a fan was negatively associated with mucosal (OR = 0.83; 95% CI = 0.79, 0.99) and dermal (OR = 0.87; 95% CI = 0.76, 1.00) symptoms. Airborne fungi (i.e., nonsporulating fungi, Cladosporium spp., and Curvularia spp.) were also significantly associated with general (OR = 1.42; 95% CI = 1.00, 2.02), mucosal (OR = 1.47; 95% CI = 1.00, 2.18), and dermal (OR = 2.23; 95% CI = 1.03, 4.83) symptoms. Proper indoor environmental management can reduce indoor air pollution and consequently promote the health of occupants.
原文英語
期刊Human and Ecological Risk Assessment (HERA)
出版狀態已發佈 - 2019

指紋

Fungi
environmental quality
Dust
Indoor air pollution
Dust collectors
Indoor Air Pollution
Sneezing
Cladosporium
Skin
Environmental management
fungus
Static Electricity
Fans
Fatigue
Headache
Logistics
Electrostatics
Logistic Models
Air
Regression Analysis

引用此文

@article{54b6888fa8864f92a8fae7950a955a92,
title = "Effect of indoor environmental quality on building-related symptoms among the residents of apartment-type buildings in Bangkok area",
abstract = "This study investigated the associations between residential characteristics and building-related symptoms (BRSs). Individuals who resided in an apartment-type building in the Bangkok area were recruited. Residential characteristics, activities, and BRSs were assessed using questionnaires. Airborne fungi were collected using an electrostatic dust collector. In total, 93 questionnaires and dust samples were returned to the laboratory. The most prevalent BRSs that the participants reported were sneezing, followed by fatigue and headache. The results of multiple logistic regression analyses showed the participants who seldom used hairstyling products had more general symptoms than those who never used them (OR = 4.35; 95{\%} CI = 1.00, 18.96). Moreover, the operating hours of an air conditioner or a fan was negatively associated with mucosal (OR = 0.83; 95{\%} CI = 0.79, 0.99) and dermal (OR = 0.87; 95{\%} CI = 0.76, 1.00) symptoms. Airborne fungi (i.e., nonsporulating fungi, Cladosporium spp., and Curvularia spp.) were also significantly associated with general (OR = 1.42; 95{\%} CI = 1.00, 2.02), mucosal (OR = 1.47; 95{\%} CI = 1.00, 2.18), and dermal (OR = 2.23; 95{\%} CI = 1.03, 4.83) symptoms. Proper indoor environmental management can reduce indoor air pollution and consequently promote the health of occupants.",
author = "{Tanachai Nitmetawong} and {Supichaya Boonvisut} and Kraiwuth Kallawicha and Hsing Chao",
year = "2019",
language = "English",
journal = "Human and Ecological Risk Assessment (HERA)",
issn = "1080-7039",
publisher = "Taylor and Francis Ltd.",

}

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T1 - Effect of indoor environmental quality on building-related symptoms among the residents of apartment-type buildings in Bangkok area

AU - Tanachai Nitmetawong,

AU - Supichaya Boonvisut,

AU - Kallawicha, Kraiwuth

AU - Chao, Hsing

PY - 2019

Y1 - 2019

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AB - This study investigated the associations between residential characteristics and building-related symptoms (BRSs). Individuals who resided in an apartment-type building in the Bangkok area were recruited. Residential characteristics, activities, and BRSs were assessed using questionnaires. Airborne fungi were collected using an electrostatic dust collector. In total, 93 questionnaires and dust samples were returned to the laboratory. The most prevalent BRSs that the participants reported were sneezing, followed by fatigue and headache. The results of multiple logistic regression analyses showed the participants who seldom used hairstyling products had more general symptoms than those who never used them (OR = 4.35; 95% CI = 1.00, 18.96). Moreover, the operating hours of an air conditioner or a fan was negatively associated with mucosal (OR = 0.83; 95% CI = 0.79, 0.99) and dermal (OR = 0.87; 95% CI = 0.76, 1.00) symptoms. Airborne fungi (i.e., nonsporulating fungi, Cladosporium spp., and Curvularia spp.) were also significantly associated with general (OR = 1.42; 95% CI = 1.00, 2.02), mucosal (OR = 1.47; 95% CI = 1.00, 2.18), and dermal (OR = 2.23; 95% CI = 1.03, 4.83) symptoms. Proper indoor environmental management can reduce indoor air pollution and consequently promote the health of occupants.

M3 - Article

JO - Human and Ecological Risk Assessment (HERA)

JF - Human and Ecological Risk Assessment (HERA)

SN - 1080-7039

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