Ecological and ethnoecological classification of a forest landscape near Smangus village in the Tayal Mrqwang territories, Taiwan

貢獻的翻譯標題: 臺灣泰雅族司馬庫斯部落的森林地景科學生態與民族生態分類學

Kevan J. Berg, Yih-Ren Lin, Lahwy icyeh

研究成果: 書貢獻/報告類型章節(同行評審)

摘要

地景,一方面是人類文化、同時也是生物物理的存在。人與地方必須合在一起,才能充分瞭解地景空間類型的內涵。本研究探索地景如何在生物物理以及人類活動交疊的互動中,反映出臺灣泰雅族馬里光群的原住民在地景的科學生態與民族生態的分類系統。採取兩種不同類型的生態分類,其目的是要決定人類行為在地景異質性的影響究竟有多大?我們利用多變異分析的統計工具,在76個樣點中找尋植被類型、環境變化梯度以及人類改造之間的關聯性。我們鑑定出11種森林型態,從高海拔的混合針葉林到低海拔的松林、竹林、赤楊林、與肉桂林。人類活動的影響在低海拔特別顯著,森林的類型與土壤的變化跟小規模的農耕,如燒墾以及梯田耕作有著密切的關聯性。我們的發現顯示泰雅族過去的土地使用對於森林的構成有著決定性的影響。民族生態學的分類跟科學生態學的分類結果並不一致。根據訪談以及自由列舉的研究結果顯示出一種非系統性的分類,它確認了一個連續性的森林變異,是來自干擾的歷史過程、地形與土壤基質以及植被等三種變項交互影響所致。這些變項受到土地利用方式與地方命名的影響,產生出變異的不同特徵,有別於傳統的命名法。雖然,缺乏形式的分類,泰雅族人卻能高度辨認出森林的差異與環境以及祖先的活動之間的關係。這種知識再現了極大的在地專業性,是自然保育以及任何的經營管理計畫中不可忽視的部分。
原文英語
主出版物標題Ethnos, geography and development: An interdisciplinary approach to human-environmental relations
編輯Da-wei Kuan
發行者 Shung Ye Museum of Formosan Aborigines
ISBN(列印)9789869239639
出版狀態已發佈 - 2017

指紋

village
comanagement
shifting cultivation
vegetation
traditional knowledge
bamboo
environmental gradient
coniferous forest
mixed forest
nomenclature
ancestry
topography
land use
disturbance
substrate
history

引用此文

Berg, K. J., Lin, Y-R., & Lahwy icyeh (2017). Ecological and ethnoecological classification of a forest landscape near Smangus village in the Tayal Mrqwang territories, Taiwan. 於 D. Kuan (編輯), Ethnos, geography and development: An interdisciplinary approach to human-environmental relations Shung Ye Museum of Formosan Aborigines.

Ecological and ethnoecological classification of a forest landscape near Smangus village in the Tayal Mrqwang territories, Taiwan. / Berg, Kevan J.; Lin, Yih-Ren; Lahwy icyeh.

Ethnos, geography and development: An interdisciplinary approach to human-environmental relations. 編輯 / Da-wei Kuan. Shung Ye Museum of Formosan Aborigines, 2017.

研究成果: 書貢獻/報告類型章節(同行評審)

Berg, KJ, Lin, Y-R & Lahwy icyeh 2017, Ecological and ethnoecological classification of a forest landscape near Smangus village in the Tayal Mrqwang territories, Taiwan. 於 D Kuan (編輯), Ethnos, geography and development: An interdisciplinary approach to human-environmental relations. Shung Ye Museum of Formosan Aborigines.
Berg KJ, Lin Y-R, Lahwy icyeh. Ecological and ethnoecological classification of a forest landscape near Smangus village in the Tayal Mrqwang territories, Taiwan. 於 Kuan D, 編輯, Ethnos, geography and development: An interdisciplinary approach to human-environmental relations. Shung Ye Museum of Formosan Aborigines. 2017
Berg, Kevan J. ; Lin, Yih-Ren ; Lahwy icyeh. / Ecological and ethnoecological classification of a forest landscape near Smangus village in the Tayal Mrqwang territories, Taiwan. Ethnos, geography and development: An interdisciplinary approach to human-environmental relations. 編輯 / Da-wei Kuan. Shung Ye Museum of Formosan Aborigines, 2017.
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abstract = "Landscape is as much a cultural entity as it is biophysical, and people and place must be jointly considered to fully understand spatial pattern. This study explores the overlapping biophysical and human dimensions of landscape in the context of an ecological and ethnoecological classification on the local landscape of the Tayal Mrqwang indigenous people in Taiwan. The goal of the ecological classification was to determine the extent to which human action accounts for landscape heterogeneity. We used multivariate tools to relate vegetation patterns to environmental gradients and human modification across 76 sites. We identifiedeleven forest types, ranging from mixed coniferous forests at high elevations, topine, bamboo, alder, and laurel stands at low elevations. The impact of humanaction was particularly evident at low elevations, where patterns of forest and soilvariation were resonant of small-scale practices (e.g., shifting cultivation, terracefarming). The findings show that past land uses of the Tayal people play a keyrole in shaping forest. The ethnoecological classification did not conform to theecological classification. Results of interviews and free-listing exercises revealedan unsystematized classification that recognizes a continuum of forest variationthrough the intersection of three overlapping categories: history of disturbance,topography and substrate, vegetation. These categories are modified through landtenure and toponyms, generating variable characterizations of variation ratherthan formalized nomenclature. However, despite the lack of formalization, theTayal are nonetheless highly cognizant of how forest variation coincides with the environment and the activities of their ancestors. This knowledge representsimmense local expertise and must not be excluded from conservation and comanagement projects in the local area.",
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