Differential Patterns of Serum Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Levels in Alcoholic Patients With and Without Delirium Tremens During Acute Withdrawal

Ming Chyi Huang, Chun Hsin Chen, Hsing Cheng Liu, Chiao Chicy Chen, Chia Chen Ho, Sy Jye Leu

研究成果: 雜誌貢獻文章

34 引文 (Scopus)

摘要

Background: Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is associated with alcohol addiction and withdrawal-related neurotoxicity. Delirium tremens (DT) is the most serious complication of alcohol withdrawal syndrome (AWS). In this study, we explored the differences in serum BDNF levels, measured at baseline and 1 week after alcohol withdrawal among alcoholic patients with and without DT.Methods: Sixty-five inpatients, fulfilling the DSM-IV criteria of alcohol dependence and admitted for alcohol detoxification, as well as 39 healthy control subjects were enrolled. The alcoholic patients were divided by the appearance of DTs into the DT group (n = 25) and non-DT group (n = 40). We collected blood samples of the patient groups on the first and seventh days of alcohol withdrawal and measured serum BDNF levels by sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.Results: Serum BDNF levels differed significantly among the three groups: (i) control group 14.8 ± 4.7 ng/ml; (ii) non-DT group 12.3 ± 3.3 ng/ml; (iii) DT group 6.2 ± 2.6 ng/ml (p <0.001). One week after alcohol withdrawal, the BDNF levels increased significantly for both alcoholic groups. While non-DT group had comparable BDNF levels (13.4 ± 3.5 ng/ml) with controls, the DT group still exhibited lower levels (8.9 ± 4.4 ng/ml).Conclusions: This study suggests chronic drinking leads to a reduction in BDNF levels, and patients with more deficient BDNF expression are vulnerable to the development of DTs. Additionally, BDNF levels elevated after prompt alcohol detoxification treatment. These findings indicate that BDNF could involve modifying the phenotypes of AWS as well as the pertinent neuroadaptive processes of alcohol dependence.

原文英語
頁(從 - 到)126-131
頁數6
期刊Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research
35
發行號1
DOIs
出版狀態已發佈 - 一月 2011

指紋

Alcohol Withdrawal Delirium
Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor
Alcoholics
Alcohols
Serum
Alcoholism
Detoxification
Immunosorbents
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Drinking
Inpatients
Assays
Healthy Volunteers
Blood
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Toxicology

引用此文

Differential Patterns of Serum Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Levels in Alcoholic Patients With and Without Delirium Tremens During Acute Withdrawal. / Huang, Ming Chyi; Chen, Chun Hsin; Liu, Hsing Cheng; Chen, Chiao Chicy; Ho, Chia Chen; Leu, Sy Jye.

於: Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, 卷 35, 編號 1, 01.2011, p. 126-131.

研究成果: 雜誌貢獻文章

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title = "Differential Patterns of Serum Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Levels in Alcoholic Patients With and Without Delirium Tremens During Acute Withdrawal",
abstract = "Background: Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is associated with alcohol addiction and withdrawal-related neurotoxicity. Delirium tremens (DT) is the most serious complication of alcohol withdrawal syndrome (AWS). In this study, we explored the differences in serum BDNF levels, measured at baseline and 1 week after alcohol withdrawal among alcoholic patients with and without DT.Methods: Sixty-five inpatients, fulfilling the DSM-IV criteria of alcohol dependence and admitted for alcohol detoxification, as well as 39 healthy control subjects were enrolled. The alcoholic patients were divided by the appearance of DTs into the DT group (n = 25) and non-DT group (n = 40). We collected blood samples of the patient groups on the first and seventh days of alcohol withdrawal and measured serum BDNF levels by sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.Results: Serum BDNF levels differed significantly among the three groups: (i) control group 14.8 ± 4.7 ng/ml; (ii) non-DT group 12.3 ± 3.3 ng/ml; (iii) DT group 6.2 ± 2.6 ng/ml (p <0.001). One week after alcohol withdrawal, the BDNF levels increased significantly for both alcoholic groups. While non-DT group had comparable BDNF levels (13.4 ± 3.5 ng/ml) with controls, the DT group still exhibited lower levels (8.9 ± 4.4 ng/ml).Conclusions: This study suggests chronic drinking leads to a reduction in BDNF levels, and patients with more deficient BDNF expression are vulnerable to the development of DTs. Additionally, BDNF levels elevated after prompt alcohol detoxification treatment. These findings indicate that BDNF could involve modifying the phenotypes of AWS as well as the pertinent neuroadaptive processes of alcohol dependence.",
keywords = "Alcohol Dependence, Alcohol Withdrawal, Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF), Delirium Tremens",
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T1 - Differential Patterns of Serum Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Levels in Alcoholic Patients With and Without Delirium Tremens During Acute Withdrawal

AU - Huang, Ming Chyi

AU - Chen, Chun Hsin

AU - Liu, Hsing Cheng

AU - Chen, Chiao Chicy

AU - Ho, Chia Chen

AU - Leu, Sy Jye

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N2 - Background: Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is associated with alcohol addiction and withdrawal-related neurotoxicity. Delirium tremens (DT) is the most serious complication of alcohol withdrawal syndrome (AWS). In this study, we explored the differences in serum BDNF levels, measured at baseline and 1 week after alcohol withdrawal among alcoholic patients with and without DT.Methods: Sixty-five inpatients, fulfilling the DSM-IV criteria of alcohol dependence and admitted for alcohol detoxification, as well as 39 healthy control subjects were enrolled. The alcoholic patients were divided by the appearance of DTs into the DT group (n = 25) and non-DT group (n = 40). We collected blood samples of the patient groups on the first and seventh days of alcohol withdrawal and measured serum BDNF levels by sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.Results: Serum BDNF levels differed significantly among the three groups: (i) control group 14.8 ± 4.7 ng/ml; (ii) non-DT group 12.3 ± 3.3 ng/ml; (iii) DT group 6.2 ± 2.6 ng/ml (p <0.001). One week after alcohol withdrawal, the BDNF levels increased significantly for both alcoholic groups. While non-DT group had comparable BDNF levels (13.4 ± 3.5 ng/ml) with controls, the DT group still exhibited lower levels (8.9 ± 4.4 ng/ml).Conclusions: This study suggests chronic drinking leads to a reduction in BDNF levels, and patients with more deficient BDNF expression are vulnerable to the development of DTs. Additionally, BDNF levels elevated after prompt alcohol detoxification treatment. These findings indicate that BDNF could involve modifying the phenotypes of AWS as well as the pertinent neuroadaptive processes of alcohol dependence.

AB - Background: Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is associated with alcohol addiction and withdrawal-related neurotoxicity. Delirium tremens (DT) is the most serious complication of alcohol withdrawal syndrome (AWS). In this study, we explored the differences in serum BDNF levels, measured at baseline and 1 week after alcohol withdrawal among alcoholic patients with and without DT.Methods: Sixty-five inpatients, fulfilling the DSM-IV criteria of alcohol dependence and admitted for alcohol detoxification, as well as 39 healthy control subjects were enrolled. The alcoholic patients were divided by the appearance of DTs into the DT group (n = 25) and non-DT group (n = 40). We collected blood samples of the patient groups on the first and seventh days of alcohol withdrawal and measured serum BDNF levels by sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.Results: Serum BDNF levels differed significantly among the three groups: (i) control group 14.8 ± 4.7 ng/ml; (ii) non-DT group 12.3 ± 3.3 ng/ml; (iii) DT group 6.2 ± 2.6 ng/ml (p <0.001). One week after alcohol withdrawal, the BDNF levels increased significantly for both alcoholic groups. While non-DT group had comparable BDNF levels (13.4 ± 3.5 ng/ml) with controls, the DT group still exhibited lower levels (8.9 ± 4.4 ng/ml).Conclusions: This study suggests chronic drinking leads to a reduction in BDNF levels, and patients with more deficient BDNF expression are vulnerable to the development of DTs. Additionally, BDNF levels elevated after prompt alcohol detoxification treatment. These findings indicate that BDNF could involve modifying the phenotypes of AWS as well as the pertinent neuroadaptive processes of alcohol dependence.

KW - Alcohol Dependence

KW - Alcohol Withdrawal

KW - Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF)

KW - Delirium Tremens

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