Developing a Framework for Adopting the Latest Health Information Technology Standards for a Next-generation Electronic Health Record

研究成果: 雜誌貢獻文章

摘要

Since AlphaGo first beat a professional human Go player, scientists have not questioned the ability of computers to treat diseases; instead, they are asking how computers can fit into clinical settings. Because various types of clinical information, such as electrocardiograms, respiratory patterns, and telemedicine, can already be digitized, this information must be processed by computers to help treat patients. Interoperability is the final stage of clinical application. The Fast Healthcare Interoperability Resources (FHIR) project is a new Health Level 7 (HL7) standard, which focuses on interoperability and agility. This month's Editor's Choice articles demonstrate how to smoothly adapt computers to clinical settings.

In 2014, the HL7 organization announced the FHIR project, which adopts several of the latest network standards (e.g., RESful, CSS, JSON). The goal of FHIR is to facilitate the implementation of an Electronic Health Record. Gøeg et al. developed a future-proof architecture for telemedicine by using a loose-coupled module and HL7 FHIR. They identified the core features of their future-proof architecture as follows: [1] To provide extended functionality, the system should be designed as a core with modules. Database-handling and implementation of security protocols are modules that improve flexibility compared with other frameworks. [2] To ensure that modules are loosely coupled, the system should invert the control mechanism. [3] A focus on ease of implementation requires that the system uses HL7 FHIR as the primary standard because it is based on web technologies.

Health information technology (IT) evolves rapidly. These Editor's Choice articles demonstrate how to swiftly implement health IT in a clinical setting.
原文英語
頁(從 - 到)A1
期刊Computer Methods and Programs in Biomedicine
160
DOIs
出版狀態已發佈 - 七月 2018

指紋

Health Level Seven
Medical Informatics
Electronic Health Records
Interoperability
Information technology
Health
Delivery of Health Care
Telemedicine
Electrocardiography
Organizations
Databases
Technology

引用此文

@article{01bb0b70117f4cafbb1e674740af7445,
title = "Developing a Framework for Adopting the Latest Health Information Technology Standards for a Next-generation Electronic Health Record",
abstract = "Since AlphaGo first beat a professional human Go player, scientists have not questioned the ability of computers to treat diseases; instead, they are asking how computers can fit into clinical settings. Because various types of clinical information, such as electrocardiograms, respiratory patterns, and telemedicine, can already be digitized, this information must be processed by computers to help treat patients. Interoperability is the final stage of clinical application. The Fast Healthcare Interoperability Resources (FHIR) project is a new Health Level 7 (HL7) standard, which focuses on interoperability and agility. This month's Editor's Choice articles demonstrate how to smoothly adapt computers to clinical settings.In 2014, the HL7 organization announced the FHIR project, which adopts several of the latest network standards (e.g., RESful, CSS, JSON). The goal of FHIR is to facilitate the implementation of an Electronic Health Record. G{\o}eg et al. developed a future-proof architecture for telemedicine by using a loose-coupled module and HL7 FHIR. They identified the core features of their future-proof architecture as follows: [1] To provide extended functionality, the system should be designed as a core with modules. Database-handling and implementation of security protocols are modules that improve flexibility compared with other frameworks. [2] To ensure that modules are loosely coupled, the system should invert the control mechanism. [3] A focus on ease of implementation requires that the system uses HL7 FHIR as the primary standard because it is based on web technologies.Health information technology (IT) evolves rapidly. These Editor's Choice articles demonstrate how to swiftly implement health IT in a clinical setting.",
author = "Ming-Chin Lin and Li, {Yu-Chuan Jack}",
year = "2018",
month = "7",
doi = "10.1016/S0169-2607(18)30557-1",
language = "English",
volume = "160",
pages = "A1",
journal = "Computer Methods and Programs in Biomedicine",
issn = "0169-2607",
publisher = "Elsevier Ireland Ltd",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Developing a Framework for Adopting the Latest Health Information Technology Standards for a Next-generation Electronic Health Record

AU - Lin, Ming-Chin

AU - Li, Yu-Chuan Jack

PY - 2018/7

Y1 - 2018/7

N2 - Since AlphaGo first beat a professional human Go player, scientists have not questioned the ability of computers to treat diseases; instead, they are asking how computers can fit into clinical settings. Because various types of clinical information, such as electrocardiograms, respiratory patterns, and telemedicine, can already be digitized, this information must be processed by computers to help treat patients. Interoperability is the final stage of clinical application. The Fast Healthcare Interoperability Resources (FHIR) project is a new Health Level 7 (HL7) standard, which focuses on interoperability and agility. This month's Editor's Choice articles demonstrate how to smoothly adapt computers to clinical settings.In 2014, the HL7 organization announced the FHIR project, which adopts several of the latest network standards (e.g., RESful, CSS, JSON). The goal of FHIR is to facilitate the implementation of an Electronic Health Record. Gøeg et al. developed a future-proof architecture for telemedicine by using a loose-coupled module and HL7 FHIR. They identified the core features of their future-proof architecture as follows: [1] To provide extended functionality, the system should be designed as a core with modules. Database-handling and implementation of security protocols are modules that improve flexibility compared with other frameworks. [2] To ensure that modules are loosely coupled, the system should invert the control mechanism. [3] A focus on ease of implementation requires that the system uses HL7 FHIR as the primary standard because it is based on web technologies.Health information technology (IT) evolves rapidly. These Editor's Choice articles demonstrate how to swiftly implement health IT in a clinical setting.

AB - Since AlphaGo first beat a professional human Go player, scientists have not questioned the ability of computers to treat diseases; instead, they are asking how computers can fit into clinical settings. Because various types of clinical information, such as electrocardiograms, respiratory patterns, and telemedicine, can already be digitized, this information must be processed by computers to help treat patients. Interoperability is the final stage of clinical application. The Fast Healthcare Interoperability Resources (FHIR) project is a new Health Level 7 (HL7) standard, which focuses on interoperability and agility. This month's Editor's Choice articles demonstrate how to smoothly adapt computers to clinical settings.In 2014, the HL7 organization announced the FHIR project, which adopts several of the latest network standards (e.g., RESful, CSS, JSON). The goal of FHIR is to facilitate the implementation of an Electronic Health Record. Gøeg et al. developed a future-proof architecture for telemedicine by using a loose-coupled module and HL7 FHIR. They identified the core features of their future-proof architecture as follows: [1] To provide extended functionality, the system should be designed as a core with modules. Database-handling and implementation of security protocols are modules that improve flexibility compared with other frameworks. [2] To ensure that modules are loosely coupled, the system should invert the control mechanism. [3] A focus on ease of implementation requires that the system uses HL7 FHIR as the primary standard because it is based on web technologies.Health information technology (IT) evolves rapidly. These Editor's Choice articles demonstrate how to swiftly implement health IT in a clinical setting.

U2 - 10.1016/S0169-2607(18)30557-1

DO - 10.1016/S0169-2607(18)30557-1

M3 - Article

C2 - 29728252

VL - 160

SP - A1

JO - Computer Methods and Programs in Biomedicine

JF - Computer Methods and Programs in Biomedicine

SN - 0169-2607

ER -