Developing a disability determination model using a decision support system in Taiwan: A pilot study

Wen Chou Chi, Tsan Hon Liou, Wen Ni Wennie Huang, Chia Feng Yen, Sue Wen Teng, I. Chiu Chang

研究成果: 雜誌貢獻文章

12 引文 (Scopus)

摘要

Background/Purpose: The aims of our study were to: (1) develop the Disability Grading Decision Support System (DGDSS) and to (2) compare the new International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF)-based disability determination tool (ICF-DDT) with the diagnosis-based disability determination tool (D-DDT). Methods: A total of 9357 patients recruited from 236 accredited institutions were evaluated using the ICF-DDT and the D-DDT, and the presence, severity, and category of the disability identified using the two determination tools were compared. In the DGDSS, the ICF-DDT consisted of four models comprising nine modules to determine the presence and the severity of the disability. The differences between models (modules) are the different combinations of World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule 2.0 (WHODAS 2.0) and Scale of Body Functions and Structures. Results: Compared with the D-DDT, more patients were determined to be disability-free when using the ICF-DDT. Module 1-1 had the highest profoundly severe rate, and module 2-2 had the highest mild and moderate disability rates. Module 2-1 had the highest severe disability rate. Module 1-1 resulted in the smallest difference, and module 3-1 resulted in the largest difference, compared with the D-DDT. Feedback from users suggested that the DGDSS is a robust system if the original data are accurate. Conclusion: The presence, severity, and category of the disability determined using the ICF-DDT and the D-DDT were significantly different. The results of the DGDSS provide information for policymakers to determine the optimal allocation of social welfare and medical resources for people with disabilities.

原文英語
頁(從 - 到)473-481
頁數9
期刊Journal of the Formosan Medical Association = Taiwan yi zhi
112
發行號8
DOIs
出版狀態已發佈 - 八月 2013

指紋

Taiwan
Information Systems
International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health
Social Welfare
Disabled Persons
Appointments and Schedules

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

引用此文

Developing a disability determination model using a decision support system in Taiwan : A pilot study. / Chi, Wen Chou; Liou, Tsan Hon; Wennie Huang, Wen Ni; Yen, Chia Feng; Teng, Sue Wen; Chang, I. Chiu.

於: Journal of the Formosan Medical Association = Taiwan yi zhi, 卷 112, 編號 8, 08.2013, p. 473-481.

研究成果: 雜誌貢獻文章

Chi, Wen Chou ; Liou, Tsan Hon ; Wennie Huang, Wen Ni ; Yen, Chia Feng ; Teng, Sue Wen ; Chang, I. Chiu. / Developing a disability determination model using a decision support system in Taiwan : A pilot study. 於: Journal of the Formosan Medical Association = Taiwan yi zhi. 2013 ; 卷 112, 編號 8. 頁 473-481.
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abstract = "Background/Purpose: The aims of our study were to: (1) develop the Disability Grading Decision Support System (DGDSS) and to (2) compare the new International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF)-based disability determination tool (ICF-DDT) with the diagnosis-based disability determination tool (D-DDT). Methods: A total of 9357 patients recruited from 236 accredited institutions were evaluated using the ICF-DDT and the D-DDT, and the presence, severity, and category of the disability identified using the two determination tools were compared. In the DGDSS, the ICF-DDT consisted of four models comprising nine modules to determine the presence and the severity of the disability. The differences between models (modules) are the different combinations of World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule 2.0 (WHODAS 2.0) and Scale of Body Functions and Structures. Results: Compared with the D-DDT, more patients were determined to be disability-free when using the ICF-DDT. Module 1-1 had the highest profoundly severe rate, and module 2-2 had the highest mild and moderate disability rates. Module 2-1 had the highest severe disability rate. Module 1-1 resulted in the smallest difference, and module 3-1 resulted in the largest difference, compared with the D-DDT. Feedback from users suggested that the DGDSS is a robust system if the original data are accurate. Conclusion: The presence, severity, and category of the disability determined using the ICF-DDT and the D-DDT were significantly different. The results of the DGDSS provide information for policymakers to determine the optimal allocation of social welfare and medical resources for people with disabilities.",
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