Determinants of breastfeeding practices among mothers in Malawi: a population-based survey

Roselyn Chipojola, Gabrielle T Lee, Hsiao-Yean Chiu, Pi-Chen Chang, Shu-Yu Kuo

研究成果: 雜誌貢獻文章

摘要

BACKGROUND: High rates of early initiation and exclusive breastfeeding have been reported in Malawi, yet the underlying factors are unknown. Our objective is to examine the determinants of breastfeeding practices for mothers of infants less than 24 months old in Malawi.

METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted using nationally representative data from the 2010 Malawi Demographic and Health Survey. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used.

RESULTS: Of 7282 women, 95.4% initiated breastfeeding within 1 hour after birth; thereafter 71.3% of women practiced exclusive breastfeeding, 6.1% predominantly breastfed, and 1.9% chose bottle feeding exclusively. The odds of early initiation were higher among women with frequent antenatal care visits and multiparous mothers. Similarly, frequent antenatal care visits and hospital delivery were positive determinants for exclusive breastfeeding. Infants at 6 months of age were more likely to predominantly breastfeed than they were at 1 month. The odds of bottle feeding were higher among women who were educated, who delivered at a hospital.

CONCLUSIONS: Optimal breastfeeding practices are highly prevalent in Malawi. Health care practice emphasizing frequent antenatal care visits that provide breastfeeding education and breastfeeding support in hospital care after childbirth are important for sustaining breastfeeding.

原文英語
期刊International Health
早期上線日期七月 11 2019
DOIs
出版狀態已發佈 - 七月 11 2019

指紋

Malawi
Breast Feeding
Mothers
determinants
Population
infant
Prenatal Care
Bottle Feeding
cross-sectional study
regression analysis
logistics
health care
Parturition
Surveys and Questionnaires
health
education
Cross-Sectional Studies
Logistic Models
Regression Analysis
Demography

引用此文

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title = "Determinants of breastfeeding practices among mothers in Malawi: a population-based survey",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: High rates of early initiation and exclusive breastfeeding have been reported in Malawi, yet the underlying factors are unknown. Our objective is to examine the determinants of breastfeeding practices for mothers of infants less than 24 months old in Malawi.METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted using nationally representative data from the 2010 Malawi Demographic and Health Survey. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used.RESULTS: Of 7282 women, 95.4{\%} initiated breastfeeding within 1 hour after birth; thereafter 71.3{\%} of women practiced exclusive breastfeeding, 6.1{\%} predominantly breastfed, and 1.9{\%} chose bottle feeding exclusively. The odds of early initiation were higher among women with frequent antenatal care visits and multiparous mothers. Similarly, frequent antenatal care visits and hospital delivery were positive determinants for exclusive breastfeeding. Infants at 6 months of age were more likely to predominantly breastfeed than they were at 1 month. The odds of bottle feeding were higher among women who were educated, who delivered at a hospital.CONCLUSIONS: Optimal breastfeeding practices are highly prevalent in Malawi. Health care practice emphasizing frequent antenatal care visits that provide breastfeeding education and breastfeeding support in hospital care after childbirth are important for sustaining breastfeeding.",
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author = "Roselyn Chipojola and Lee, {Gabrielle T} and Hsiao-Yean Chiu and Pi-Chen Chang and Shu-Yu Kuo",
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AU - Chipojola, Roselyn

AU - Lee, Gabrielle T

AU - Chiu, Hsiao-Yean

AU - Chang, Pi-Chen

AU - Kuo, Shu-Yu

N1 - © The Author(s) 2019. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

PY - 2019/7/11

Y1 - 2019/7/11

N2 - BACKGROUND: High rates of early initiation and exclusive breastfeeding have been reported in Malawi, yet the underlying factors are unknown. Our objective is to examine the determinants of breastfeeding practices for mothers of infants less than 24 months old in Malawi.METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted using nationally representative data from the 2010 Malawi Demographic and Health Survey. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used.RESULTS: Of 7282 women, 95.4% initiated breastfeeding within 1 hour after birth; thereafter 71.3% of women practiced exclusive breastfeeding, 6.1% predominantly breastfed, and 1.9% chose bottle feeding exclusively. The odds of early initiation were higher among women with frequent antenatal care visits and multiparous mothers. Similarly, frequent antenatal care visits and hospital delivery were positive determinants for exclusive breastfeeding. Infants at 6 months of age were more likely to predominantly breastfeed than they were at 1 month. The odds of bottle feeding were higher among women who were educated, who delivered at a hospital.CONCLUSIONS: Optimal breastfeeding practices are highly prevalent in Malawi. Health care practice emphasizing frequent antenatal care visits that provide breastfeeding education and breastfeeding support in hospital care after childbirth are important for sustaining breastfeeding.

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KW - sustainable breastfeeding practices

KW - prenatal breastfeeding education

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