Comparing radiation exposure during percutaneous vertebroplasty using one vs Two-fluoroscopic technique

Yen Yao Li, Tsung Jen Huang, Chin Chang Cheng, Meng Huang Wu, Ching Yu Lee

研究成果: 雜誌貢獻文章

13 引文 (Scopus)

摘要

Background: Percutaneous vertebroplasty (PV) requires relatively lengthy fluoroscopic guidance, which might lead to substantial radiation exposure to patients or operators. The two-fluoroscopic technique (two-plane radiographs obtained using two fluoroscopes) during PV can provide simultaneous two-planar projections with reducing operative time. However, the two-fluoroscopic technique may expose the operator or patient to increased radiation dose. The aim of this study was to quantify the amount of radiation exposure to the patient or operator that occurs during PV using one- vs. two-fluoroscopic technique. Methods. Two radiation dosimeters were placed on the right flank of each patient and on the upper sternum of each operator during 26 single-level PV procedures by one senior surgeon. The use of two-fluoroscopic technique (13 patients) and one-fluoroscopic technique (13 patients) were allocated in a consecutive and alternative manner. The operative time and mean radiation dose to each patient and operator were monitored and compared between groups. Results: Mean radiation dose to the patient was 1.97 ± 1.20 mSv (95% CI, 0.71 to 3.23) for the one-fluoroscopic technique group vs. 0.95 ± 0.34 mSv (95% CI, 0.85 to 1.23) for the two-fluoroscopic technique group (P =0.031). Mean radiation dose to the operator was 0.27 ± 0.12 mSv (95% CI, 0.17-0.56) for the one-fluoroscopic technique group vs. 0.25 ± 0.14 mSv (95% CI, 0.06-0.44) for the two-fluoroscopic technique group (P = 0.653). The operative time was significantly different between groups: 47.15 ± 13.48 min (range, 20-75) for the one-fluoroscopic technique group vs. 36.62 ± 8.42 min (range, 21-50) for the two-fluoroscopic technique group (P =0.019). Conclusion: Compared to the one-fluoroscopic technique, the two-fluoroscopic technique used during PV provides not only shorter operative times but also reduces the radiation exposure to the patient. There was no significant difference between the two techniques with regards to radiation exposure to the operator.

原文英語
文章編號38
期刊BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
14
DOIs
出版狀態已發佈 - 2013
對外發佈Yes

指紋

Vertebroplasty
Operative Time
Radiation
Radiation Exposure
Sternum

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Rheumatology

引用此文

@article{c9fec72cf9a84a61aa12e79388a4bc1b,
title = "Comparing radiation exposure during percutaneous vertebroplasty using one vs Two-fluoroscopic technique",
abstract = "Background: Percutaneous vertebroplasty (PV) requires relatively lengthy fluoroscopic guidance, which might lead to substantial radiation exposure to patients or operators. The two-fluoroscopic technique (two-plane radiographs obtained using two fluoroscopes) during PV can provide simultaneous two-planar projections with reducing operative time. However, the two-fluoroscopic technique may expose the operator or patient to increased radiation dose. The aim of this study was to quantify the amount of radiation exposure to the patient or operator that occurs during PV using one- vs. two-fluoroscopic technique. Methods. Two radiation dosimeters were placed on the right flank of each patient and on the upper sternum of each operator during 26 single-level PV procedures by one senior surgeon. The use of two-fluoroscopic technique (13 patients) and one-fluoroscopic technique (13 patients) were allocated in a consecutive and alternative manner. The operative time and mean radiation dose to each patient and operator were monitored and compared between groups. Results: Mean radiation dose to the patient was 1.97 ± 1.20 mSv (95{\%} CI, 0.71 to 3.23) for the one-fluoroscopic technique group vs. 0.95 ± 0.34 mSv (95{\%} CI, 0.85 to 1.23) for the two-fluoroscopic technique group (P =0.031). Mean radiation dose to the operator was 0.27 ± 0.12 mSv (95{\%} CI, 0.17-0.56) for the one-fluoroscopic technique group vs. 0.25 ± 0.14 mSv (95{\%} CI, 0.06-0.44) for the two-fluoroscopic technique group (P = 0.653). The operative time was significantly different between groups: 47.15 ± 13.48 min (range, 20-75) for the one-fluoroscopic technique group vs. 36.62 ± 8.42 min (range, 21-50) for the two-fluoroscopic technique group (P =0.019). Conclusion: Compared to the one-fluoroscopic technique, the two-fluoroscopic technique used during PV provides not only shorter operative times but also reduces the radiation exposure to the patient. There was no significant difference between the two techniques with regards to radiation exposure to the operator.",
keywords = "Osteoporosis, Radiation dose, Vertebral compression fracture, Vertebroplasty",
author = "Li, {Yen Yao} and Huang, {Tsung Jen} and Cheng, {Chin Chang} and Wu, {Meng Huang} and Lee, {Ching Yu}",
year = "2013",
doi = "10.1186/1471-2474-14-38",
language = "English",
volume = "14",
journal = "BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders",
issn = "1471-2474",
publisher = "BioMed Central",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Comparing radiation exposure during percutaneous vertebroplasty using one vs Two-fluoroscopic technique

AU - Li, Yen Yao

AU - Huang, Tsung Jen

AU - Cheng, Chin Chang

AU - Wu, Meng Huang

AU - Lee, Ching Yu

PY - 2013

Y1 - 2013

N2 - Background: Percutaneous vertebroplasty (PV) requires relatively lengthy fluoroscopic guidance, which might lead to substantial radiation exposure to patients or operators. The two-fluoroscopic technique (two-plane radiographs obtained using two fluoroscopes) during PV can provide simultaneous two-planar projections with reducing operative time. However, the two-fluoroscopic technique may expose the operator or patient to increased radiation dose. The aim of this study was to quantify the amount of radiation exposure to the patient or operator that occurs during PV using one- vs. two-fluoroscopic technique. Methods. Two radiation dosimeters were placed on the right flank of each patient and on the upper sternum of each operator during 26 single-level PV procedures by one senior surgeon. The use of two-fluoroscopic technique (13 patients) and one-fluoroscopic technique (13 patients) were allocated in a consecutive and alternative manner. The operative time and mean radiation dose to each patient and operator were monitored and compared between groups. Results: Mean radiation dose to the patient was 1.97 ± 1.20 mSv (95% CI, 0.71 to 3.23) for the one-fluoroscopic technique group vs. 0.95 ± 0.34 mSv (95% CI, 0.85 to 1.23) for the two-fluoroscopic technique group (P =0.031). Mean radiation dose to the operator was 0.27 ± 0.12 mSv (95% CI, 0.17-0.56) for the one-fluoroscopic technique group vs. 0.25 ± 0.14 mSv (95% CI, 0.06-0.44) for the two-fluoroscopic technique group (P = 0.653). The operative time was significantly different between groups: 47.15 ± 13.48 min (range, 20-75) for the one-fluoroscopic technique group vs. 36.62 ± 8.42 min (range, 21-50) for the two-fluoroscopic technique group (P =0.019). Conclusion: Compared to the one-fluoroscopic technique, the two-fluoroscopic technique used during PV provides not only shorter operative times but also reduces the radiation exposure to the patient. There was no significant difference between the two techniques with regards to radiation exposure to the operator.

AB - Background: Percutaneous vertebroplasty (PV) requires relatively lengthy fluoroscopic guidance, which might lead to substantial radiation exposure to patients or operators. The two-fluoroscopic technique (two-plane radiographs obtained using two fluoroscopes) during PV can provide simultaneous two-planar projections with reducing operative time. However, the two-fluoroscopic technique may expose the operator or patient to increased radiation dose. The aim of this study was to quantify the amount of radiation exposure to the patient or operator that occurs during PV using one- vs. two-fluoroscopic technique. Methods. Two radiation dosimeters were placed on the right flank of each patient and on the upper sternum of each operator during 26 single-level PV procedures by one senior surgeon. The use of two-fluoroscopic technique (13 patients) and one-fluoroscopic technique (13 patients) were allocated in a consecutive and alternative manner. The operative time and mean radiation dose to each patient and operator were monitored and compared between groups. Results: Mean radiation dose to the patient was 1.97 ± 1.20 mSv (95% CI, 0.71 to 3.23) for the one-fluoroscopic technique group vs. 0.95 ± 0.34 mSv (95% CI, 0.85 to 1.23) for the two-fluoroscopic technique group (P =0.031). Mean radiation dose to the operator was 0.27 ± 0.12 mSv (95% CI, 0.17-0.56) for the one-fluoroscopic technique group vs. 0.25 ± 0.14 mSv (95% CI, 0.06-0.44) for the two-fluoroscopic technique group (P = 0.653). The operative time was significantly different between groups: 47.15 ± 13.48 min (range, 20-75) for the one-fluoroscopic technique group vs. 36.62 ± 8.42 min (range, 21-50) for the two-fluoroscopic technique group (P =0.019). Conclusion: Compared to the one-fluoroscopic technique, the two-fluoroscopic technique used during PV provides not only shorter operative times but also reduces the radiation exposure to the patient. There was no significant difference between the two techniques with regards to radiation exposure to the operator.

KW - Osteoporosis

KW - Radiation dose

KW - Vertebral compression fracture

KW - Vertebroplasty

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DO - 10.1186/1471-2474-14-38

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VL - 14

JO - BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders

JF - BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders

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