Cerebral Microbleeds are Associated with Postural Instability and Gait Disturbance Subtype in People with Parkinson's Disease

研究成果: 雜誌貢獻文章

摘要

Objectives: The motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD) vary among patients and have been categorized into 3 subtypes: tremor dominant, akinetic rigidity, and postural instability and gait disturbance (PIGD). Cerebral microbleed (CMB) is prevalent in people with PD and is associated with some nonmotor symptoms. The present study investigated the association between CMB and the motor subtypes of PD. Materials and Methods: From 2009 to 2017, medical records and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) reports of 134 Taiwanese people with early-and mid-stage PD were reviewed. CMBs were quantified according to the Microbleed Anatomical Rating Scale through susceptibility-weighted MRI. Motor subtypes were determined by medical chart review. Student's t test and multivariable logistic regression were used to analyze the association between the motor subtypes and CMB. Statistical analyses were performed using SPSS 19.0. Results: Overall, 72 (53.7%) participants were women with a mean age of 69.5 ± 9.8 years. The prevalence of CMB was 33.6%, and lobar, deep, and infratentorial CMBs comprised 21.6, 19.4, and 11.9% of cases, respectively. PIGD subtype PD was associated with a significantly higher prevalence of any CMB as well as deep or lobar CMB. After adjustment for age and sex, the PIGD subtype was significantly positively associated with the presence of any, deep, and white matter (WM) and thalamic CMB. Conclusions: CMB was prevalent in Taiwanese people with early-and mid-stage PD, especially the PIGD subtype. Deep, especially thalamic and WM, CMBs exhibited the highest association with the PIGD subtype.
原文英語
頁(從 - 到)335-340
頁數6
期刊European Neurology
80
發行號5-6
DOIs
出版狀態已發佈 - 四月 1 2019

指紋

Gait
Parkinson Disease
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Tremor
Medical Records
Logistic Models
Students
Brain

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

引用此文

@article{2b77b1a7120e41d78b793e5f65c695a7,
title = "Cerebral Microbleeds are Associated with Postural Instability and Gait Disturbance Subtype in People with Parkinson's Disease",
abstract = "Objectives: The motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD) vary among patients and have been categorized into 3 subtypes: tremor dominant, akinetic rigidity, and postural instability and gait disturbance (PIGD). Cerebral microbleed (CMB) is prevalent in people with PD and is associated with some nonmotor symptoms. The present study investigated the association between CMB and the motor subtypes of PD. Materials and Methods: From 2009 to 2017, medical records and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) reports of 134 Taiwanese people with early-and mid-stage PD were reviewed. CMBs were quantified according to the Microbleed Anatomical Rating Scale through susceptibility-weighted MRI. Motor subtypes were determined by medical chart review. Student's t test and multivariable logistic regression were used to analyze the association between the motor subtypes and CMB. Statistical analyses were performed using SPSS 19.0. Results: Overall, 72 (53.7{\%}) participants were women with a mean age of 69.5 ± 9.8 years. The prevalence of CMB was 33.6{\%}, and lobar, deep, and infratentorial CMBs comprised 21.6, 19.4, and 11.9{\%} of cases, respectively. PIGD subtype PD was associated with a significantly higher prevalence of any CMB as well as deep or lobar CMB. After adjustment for age and sex, the PIGD subtype was significantly positively associated with the presence of any, deep, and white matter (WM) and thalamic CMB. Conclusions: CMB was prevalent in Taiwanese people with early-and mid-stage PD, especially the PIGD subtype. Deep, especially thalamic and WM, CMBs exhibited the highest association with the PIGD subtype.",
keywords = "Cerebral microbleeds, Parkinson's disease, Susceptibilityweighted magnetic resonance imaging",
author = "Chiu, {Wei Ting} and Lung Chan and Dean Wu and Ko, {Tzu Hsiang} and Chen, {David Yen Ting} and Hong, {Chien Tai}",
year = "2019",
month = "4",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1159/000499378",
language = "English",
volume = "80",
pages = "335--340",
journal = "European Neurology",
issn = "0014-3022",
publisher = "S. Karger AG",
number = "5-6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Cerebral Microbleeds are Associated with Postural Instability and Gait Disturbance Subtype in People with Parkinson's Disease

AU - Chiu, Wei Ting

AU - Chan, Lung

AU - Wu, Dean

AU - Ko, Tzu Hsiang

AU - Chen, David Yen Ting

AU - Hong, Chien Tai

PY - 2019/4/1

Y1 - 2019/4/1

N2 - Objectives: The motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD) vary among patients and have been categorized into 3 subtypes: tremor dominant, akinetic rigidity, and postural instability and gait disturbance (PIGD). Cerebral microbleed (CMB) is prevalent in people with PD and is associated with some nonmotor symptoms. The present study investigated the association between CMB and the motor subtypes of PD. Materials and Methods: From 2009 to 2017, medical records and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) reports of 134 Taiwanese people with early-and mid-stage PD were reviewed. CMBs were quantified according to the Microbleed Anatomical Rating Scale through susceptibility-weighted MRI. Motor subtypes were determined by medical chart review. Student's t test and multivariable logistic regression were used to analyze the association between the motor subtypes and CMB. Statistical analyses were performed using SPSS 19.0. Results: Overall, 72 (53.7%) participants were women with a mean age of 69.5 ± 9.8 years. The prevalence of CMB was 33.6%, and lobar, deep, and infratentorial CMBs comprised 21.6, 19.4, and 11.9% of cases, respectively. PIGD subtype PD was associated with a significantly higher prevalence of any CMB as well as deep or lobar CMB. After adjustment for age and sex, the PIGD subtype was significantly positively associated with the presence of any, deep, and white matter (WM) and thalamic CMB. Conclusions: CMB was prevalent in Taiwanese people with early-and mid-stage PD, especially the PIGD subtype. Deep, especially thalamic and WM, CMBs exhibited the highest association with the PIGD subtype.

AB - Objectives: The motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD) vary among patients and have been categorized into 3 subtypes: tremor dominant, akinetic rigidity, and postural instability and gait disturbance (PIGD). Cerebral microbleed (CMB) is prevalent in people with PD and is associated with some nonmotor symptoms. The present study investigated the association between CMB and the motor subtypes of PD. Materials and Methods: From 2009 to 2017, medical records and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) reports of 134 Taiwanese people with early-and mid-stage PD were reviewed. CMBs were quantified according to the Microbleed Anatomical Rating Scale through susceptibility-weighted MRI. Motor subtypes were determined by medical chart review. Student's t test and multivariable logistic regression were used to analyze the association between the motor subtypes and CMB. Statistical analyses were performed using SPSS 19.0. Results: Overall, 72 (53.7%) participants were women with a mean age of 69.5 ± 9.8 years. The prevalence of CMB was 33.6%, and lobar, deep, and infratentorial CMBs comprised 21.6, 19.4, and 11.9% of cases, respectively. PIGD subtype PD was associated with a significantly higher prevalence of any CMB as well as deep or lobar CMB. After adjustment for age and sex, the PIGD subtype was significantly positively associated with the presence of any, deep, and white matter (WM) and thalamic CMB. Conclusions: CMB was prevalent in Taiwanese people with early-and mid-stage PD, especially the PIGD subtype. Deep, especially thalamic and WM, CMBs exhibited the highest association with the PIGD subtype.

KW - Cerebral microbleeds

KW - Parkinson's disease

KW - Susceptibilityweighted magnetic resonance imaging

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U2 - 10.1159/000499378

DO - 10.1159/000499378

M3 - Article

VL - 80

SP - 335

EP - 340

JO - European Neurology

JF - European Neurology

SN - 0014-3022

IS - 5-6

ER -