Bioaerosol levels and the indoor air quality of laboratories in Bangkok metropolis

K. Kallawicha, H.J. Chao, N. Kotchasatan

研究成果: 雜誌貢獻文章

1 引文 (Scopus)

摘要

Bioaerosols are major air pollutants commonly found both indoors and outdoors. High exposure levels may result in various adverse health outcomes. Laboratories, which are indoor environments carefully designed for specific purposes, may contain high levels of bioaerosols, which may threaten worker’s health, and contaminate experimental results. This study investigated the levels of bioaerosols (i.e., culturable fungi and bacteria, and fungal spores) in laboratories in the Bangkok metropolitan area. Air samples were collected from 14 Class I and one Class II laboratories by using a single-stage impactor and a VersaTrap spore trap cassette. Colonies were counted after 72 h and 48 h of incubation for culturable fungi and bacteria, respectively. Culturable fungi and fungal spores were identified based on their morphological characteristics. Associations between bioaerosols and indoor air parameters and laboratory characteristics were evaluated. The concentrations (mean ± SD) of culturable bacteria, culturable fungi, and fungal spores were 87.0 ± 97.8 CFU/m3, 294.9 ± 376.1 CFU/m3, and 771.8 ± 545.3 spores/m3, respectively. Aspergillus/Penicillium, ascospores, and Cladosporium were common fungal spore taxa in the laboratories. Culturable fungi significantly increased with the number of staff and visible molds, whereas water leaks and culturable fungi significantly increased fungal spore concentrations. Culturable bacteria were positively associated with the numbers of trash bins and − 80 °C freezers. Although bioaerosol concentrations were considerably lower in the studied laboratories, proper indoor air management is still suggested in order to reduce emissions and exposure. This can help workers avoid adverse health outcomes and reduce the chance of experimental contamination
原文英語
期刊Aerobiologia
DOIs
出版狀態已發佈 - 2019

指紋

bioaerosols
Indoor Air Pollution
air quality
fungal spores
Fungal Spores
Fungi
fungi
air
Bacteria
bacteria
Air
Spores
Health
freezers
Cladosporium
Air Pollutants
health care workers
ascospores
Penicillium
Aspergillus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology
  • Plant Science

引用此文

Bioaerosol levels and the indoor air quality of laboratories in Bangkok metropolis. / Kallawicha, K.; Chao, H.J.; Kotchasatan, N.

於: Aerobiologia, 2019.

研究成果: 雜誌貢獻文章

@article{501db340a12848909427fd7b0e0ec03c,
title = "Bioaerosol levels and the indoor air quality of laboratories in Bangkok metropolis",
abstract = "Bioaerosols are major air pollutants commonly found both indoors and outdoors. High exposure levels may result in various adverse health outcomes. Laboratories, which are indoor environments carefully designed for specific purposes, may contain high levels of bioaerosols, which may threaten worker’s health, and contaminate experimental results. This study investigated the levels of bioaerosols (i.e., culturable fungi and bacteria, and fungal spores) in laboratories in the Bangkok metropolitan area. Air samples were collected from 14 Class I and one Class II laboratories by using a single-stage impactor and a VersaTrap spore trap cassette. Colonies were counted after 72 h and 48 h of incubation for culturable fungi and bacteria, respectively. Culturable fungi and fungal spores were identified based on their morphological characteristics. Associations between bioaerosols and indoor air parameters and laboratory characteristics were evaluated. The concentrations (mean ± SD) of culturable bacteria, culturable fungi, and fungal spores were 87.0 ± 97.8 CFU/m3, 294.9 ± 376.1 CFU/m3, and 771.8 ± 545.3 spores/m3, respectively. Aspergillus/Penicillium, ascospores, and Cladosporium were common fungal spore taxa in the laboratories. Culturable fungi significantly increased with the number of staff and visible molds, whereas water leaks and culturable fungi significantly increased fungal spore concentrations. Culturable bacteria were positively associated with the numbers of trash bins and − 80 °C freezers. Although bioaerosol concentrations were considerably lower in the studied laboratories, proper indoor air management is still suggested in order to reduce emissions and exposure. This can help workers avoid adverse health outcomes and reduce the chance of experimental contamination. {\circledC} 2018, Springer Nature B.V.",
keywords = "Bacteria, Bioaerosols, Fungal spore, Fungi, Indoor air quality, Laboratory",
author = "K. Kallawicha and H.J. Chao and N. Kotchasatan",
note = "Export Date: 12 October 2018 Article in Press CODEN: AROBF 通訊地址: Kallawicha, K.; Environmental Toxicology Program, Chulabhorn Graduate Institute, Chulabhorn Royal Academy, 54 Kamphaeng Phet 6, Talat Bang Khen, Lak Si, Thailand; 電子郵件: kraiwuthk@gmail.com 參考文獻: Adams, R.I., Miletto, M., Lindow, S.E., Taylor, J.W., Bruns, T.D., Airborne bacterial communities in residences: Similarities and differences with fungi (2014) PLoS ONE, 9 (3); Adams, R.I., Miletto, M., Taylor, J.W., Bruns, T.D., Dispersal in microbes: Fungi in indoor air are dominated by outdoor air and show dispersal limitation at short distances (2013) ISME Journal, 7 (7), pp. 1262-1273; Adhikari, A., Gupta, J., Wilkins, J.R., III, Olds, R.L., Indugula, R., Cho, K.J., Airborne microorganisms, endotoxin, and (1/3)-b-D-glucan exposure in greenhouses and assessment of respiratory symptoms among workers (2011) Annals of Occupational Hygiene, 55 (3), pp. 272-285; Aira, M.-J., Rodr{\'i}guez-Rajo, F.-J., Fern{\'a}ndez-Gonz{\'a}lez, M., Seijo, C., Elvira-Rendueles, B., Abreu, I., Spatial and temporal distribution of Alternaria spores in the Iberian Peninsula atmosphere, and meteorological relationships: 1993–2009 (2013) International Journal of Biometeorology, 57 (2), pp. 265-274; Alves, C., Duarte, M., Ferreira, M., Alves, A., Almeida, A., Cunha, {\^A}., Air quality in a school with dampness and mould problems (2016) Air Quality, Atmosphere and Health, 9 (2), pp. 107-115; Balasubramanian, R., Nainar, P., Rajasekar, A., Airborne bacteria, fungi, and endotoxin levels in residential microenvironments: A case study (2012) Aerobiologia, 28 (3), pp. 375-390; Basilico, M.L.Z., Chiericatti, C., Aringoli, E.E., Althaus, R.L., Basilico, J.C., Influence of environmental factors on airborne fungi in houses of Santa Fe City, Argentina (2007) Science of the Total Environment, 376 (1-3), pp. 143-150; Burge, H.A., Bioaerosols and the scientific method (2003) Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology, 91 (3), pp. 217-219; Burge, H.A., Rogers, C.A., Outdoor allergens (2000) Environmental Health Perspectives, 108, pp. 653-659; Chao, H.J., Schwartz, J., Milton, D.K., Burge, H.A., The work environment and workers’ health in four large office buildings (2003) Environmental Health Perspectives, 111 (9), pp. 1242-1248; Chen, C.-H., Chao, H.J., Chan, C.-C., Chen, B.-Y., Guo, Y.L., Current asthma in schoolchildren is related to fungal spores in classrooms (2014) Chest, 146 (1), pp. 123-134; Chen, B.-Y., Chao, H.J., Chan, C.-C., Lee, C.-T., Wu, H.-P., Cheng, T.-J., Effects of ambient particulate matter and fungal spores on lung function in schoolchildren (2011) Pediatrics, 127 (3), pp. e690-e698; Codina, R., Fox, R., Lockey, R., DeMarco, P., Bagg, A., Typical levels of airborne fungal spores in houses without obvious moisture problems during a rainy season in Florida, USA (2008) Journal of Investigational Allergology and Clinical Immunology, 18 (3), pp. 156-162; Crawford, J.A., Rosenbaum, P.F., Anagnost, S.E., Hunt, A., Abraham, J.L., Indicators of airborne fungal concentrations in urban homes: Understanding the conditions that affect indoor fungal exposures (2015) Science of the Total Environment, 517, pp. 113-124; Fern{\'a}ndez-Rodr{\'i}guez, S., Sadyś, M., Smith, M., Tormo-Molina, R., Skj{\o}th, C.A., Maya-Manzano, J.M., Potential sources of airborne Alternaria spp. spores in South-west Spain (2015) Science of the Total Environment, 533, pp. 165-176; Fern{\'a}ndez-Rodr{\'i}guez, S., Tormo-Molina, R., Maya-Manzano, J.M., Silva-Palacios, I., Gonzalo-Garijo, {\'A}., Outdoor airborne fungi captured by viable and nonviable methods (2014) Fungal Ecology, 7, pp. 16-26; Gon{\cc}alves, F.L.T., Bauer, H., Cardoso, M.R.A., Pukinskas, S., Matos, D., Melhem, M., Indoor and outdoor atmospheric fungal spores in the S{\~a}o Paulo metropolitan area (Brazil): Species and numeric concentrations (2010) International Journal of Biometeorology, 54 (4), pp. 347-355; Haas, D., Habib, J., Luxner, J., Galler, H., Zarfel, G., Schlacher, R., Comparison of background levels of culturable fungal spore concentrations in indoor and outdoor air in southeastern Austria (2014) Atmospheric Environment, 98, pp. 640-647; Hargreaves, M., Parappukkaran, S., Morawska, L., Hitchins, J., He, C., Gilbert, D., A pilot investigation into associations between indoor airborne fungal and non-biological particle concentrations in residential houses in Brisbane, Australia (2003) Science of the Total Environment, 312 (1-3), pp. 89-101; Heo, K.J., Lim, C.E., Kim, H.B., Lee, B.U., Effects of human activities on concentrations of culturable bioaerosols in indoor air environments (2017) Journal of Aerosol Science, 104, pp. 58-65; Hsu, N.-Y., Chen, P.-Y., Chang, H.-W., Su, H.-J., Changes in profiles of airborne fungi in flooded homes in southern Taiwan after Typhoon Morakot (2011) Science of the Total Environment, 409, pp. 1677-1682; Hsu, Y.-C., Kung, P.-Y., Wu, T.-N., Shen, Y.-H., Characterization of indoor-air bioaerosols in southern Taiwan (2012) Aerosol and Air Quality Research, 12, pp. 651-661; Hwang, S., Ko, Y., Park, D., Yoon, C., Seasonality in airborne bacterial, fungal, and (1 → 3)-β-D-glucan concentrations in two indoor laboratory animal rooms (2018) Journal of Clinical Pathology, 71 (1), pp. 59-66; Hwang, S.H., Lee, I.M., Yoon, C.S., Levels of total airborne bacteria, gram-negative bacteria, and endotoxin according to biosafety levels in Korean biosafety laboratories (2013) Human and Ecological Risk Assessment: An International Journal, 19 (6), pp. 1576-1585; Hwang, B.F., Liu, I.P., Huang, T.P., Molds, parental atopy and pediatric incident asthma (2011) Indoor Air, 21 (6), pp. 472-478; Hwang, S.H., Park, D.U., Ha, K.C., Cho, H.W., Yoon, C.S., Airborne bacteria concentrations and related factors at university laboratories, hospital diagnostic laboratories and a biowaste site (2011) Journal of Clinical Pathology, 64 (3), pp. 261-264; Hwang, S.H., Park, D.U., Yoon, C.S., Levels of airborne biological agents and related factors in indoor environments of fish toxicity laboratory (2017) Human and Ecological Risk Assessment: An International Journal, 23 (7), pp. 1553-1563; Information Centre, I.A.Q., A guide on indoor air quality certification scheme for offices and public places (2003) Environmental Protection Department: The Government of The Hong Kong Special Administrative Region Indoor Air Quality Management Group, , http://www.iaq.gov.hk/, Accessed 6 October 2017; Jara, D., Portnoy, J., Dhar, M., Barnes, C., Relation of indoor and outdoor airborne fungal spore levels in the Kansas City metropolitan area (2017) Allergy and Asthma Proceedings, 38 (2), pp. 130-135; 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Rogers, C., Muilenberg, M., Comprehensive guidelines for the operation of Hirst-type suction bioaerosol samplers (2001) The Pan-American Aerobiology Association; Rosenbaum, P.F., Crawford, J.A., Anagnost, S.E., Wang, C.J.K., Hunt, A., Anbar, R.D., Indoor airborne fungi and wheeze in the first year of life among a cohort of infants at risk for asthma (2010) Journal of Exposure Science & Environmental Epidemiology, 20, pp. 503-515; Sabariego, S., Guardia, C.D., Alba, F., The effect of meteorological factors on the daily variation of airborne fungal spores in Granada (southern Spain) (2000) International Journal of Biometeorology, 44, pp. 1-5; Sadys, M., Skj{\o}th, C.A., Kennedy, R., Back-trajectories show export of airborne fungal spores (Ganoderma sp.) from forests to agricultural and urban areas in England (2014) Atmospheric Environment, 84, pp. 88-99; Salonen, H., Duchaine, C., Mazaheri, M., Clifford, S., Morawska, L., Airborne culturable fungi in naturally ventilated primary school environments in a subtropical climate (2015) Atmospheric Environment, 106, pp. 412-418; 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Vesper, S., Barnes, C., Ciaccio, C.E., Johanns, A., Kennedy, K., Murphy, J.S., Higher Environmental Relative Moldiness Index (ERMI) values measured in homes of asthmatic children in Boston, Kansas City, and San Diego (2013) Journal of Asthma, 50 (2), pp. 155-161; Wu, P.C., Li, Y.Y., Chiang, C.M., Huang, C.Y., Lee, C.C., Li, F.C., Changing microbial concentrations are associated with ventilation performance in Taiwan’s air-conditioned office buildings (2005) Indoor Air, 15 (1), pp. 19-26",
year = "2019",
doi = "10.1007/s10453-018-9535-5",
language = "English",
journal = "Aerobiologia",
issn = "0393-5965",
publisher = "Springer Netherlands",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Bioaerosol levels and the indoor air quality of laboratories in Bangkok metropolis

AU - Kallawicha, K.

AU - Chao, H.J.

AU - Kotchasatan, N.

N1 - Export Date: 12 October 2018 Article in Press CODEN: AROBF 通訊地址: Kallawicha, K.; Environmental Toxicology Program, Chulabhorn Graduate Institute, Chulabhorn Royal Academy, 54 Kamphaeng Phet 6, Talat Bang Khen, Lak Si, Thailand; 電子郵件: kraiwuthk@gmail.com 參考文獻: Adams, R.I., Miletto, M., Lindow, S.E., Taylor, J.W., Bruns, T.D., Airborne bacterial communities in residences: Similarities and differences with fungi (2014) PLoS ONE, 9 (3); Adams, R.I., Miletto, M., Taylor, J.W., Bruns, T.D., Dispersal in microbes: Fungi in indoor air are dominated by outdoor air and show dispersal limitation at short distances (2013) ISME Journal, 7 (7), pp. 1262-1273; Adhikari, A., Gupta, J., Wilkins, J.R., III, Olds, R.L., Indugula, R., Cho, K.J., Airborne microorganisms, endotoxin, and (1/3)-b-D-glucan exposure in greenhouses and assessment of respiratory symptoms among workers (2011) Annals of Occupational Hygiene, 55 (3), pp. 272-285; Aira, M.-J., Rodríguez-Rajo, F.-J., Fernández-González, M., Seijo, C., Elvira-Rendueles, B., Abreu, I., Spatial and temporal distribution of Alternaria spores in the Iberian Peninsula atmosphere, and meteorological relationships: 1993–2009 (2013) International Journal of Biometeorology, 57 (2), pp. 265-274; Alves, C., Duarte, M., Ferreira, M., Alves, A., Almeida, A., Cunha, Â., Air quality in a school with dampness and mould problems (2016) Air Quality, Atmosphere and Health, 9 (2), pp. 107-115; Balasubramanian, R., Nainar, P., Rajasekar, A., Airborne bacteria, fungi, and endotoxin levels in residential microenvironments: A case study (2012) Aerobiologia, 28 (3), pp. 375-390; Basilico, M.L.Z., Chiericatti, C., Aringoli, E.E., Althaus, R.L., Basilico, J.C., Influence of environmental factors on airborne fungi in houses of Santa Fe City, Argentina (2007) Science of the Total Environment, 376 (1-3), pp. 143-150; Burge, H.A., Bioaerosols and the scientific method (2003) Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology, 91 (3), pp. 217-219; Burge, H.A., Rogers, C.A., Outdoor allergens (2000) Environmental Health Perspectives, 108, pp. 653-659; Chao, H.J., Schwartz, J., Milton, D.K., Burge, H.A., The work environment and workers’ health in four large office buildings (2003) Environmental Health Perspectives, 111 (9), pp. 1242-1248; Chen, C.-H., Chao, H.J., Chan, C.-C., Chen, B.-Y., Guo, Y.L., Current asthma in schoolchildren is related to fungal spores in classrooms (2014) Chest, 146 (1), pp. 123-134; Chen, B.-Y., Chao, H.J., Chan, C.-C., Lee, C.-T., Wu, H.-P., Cheng, T.-J., Effects of ambient particulate matter and fungal spores on lung function in schoolchildren (2011) Pediatrics, 127 (3), pp. e690-e698; Codina, R., Fox, R., Lockey, R., DeMarco, P., Bagg, A., Typical levels of airborne fungal spores in houses without obvious moisture problems during a rainy season in Florida, USA (2008) Journal of Investigational Allergology and Clinical Immunology, 18 (3), pp. 156-162; Crawford, J.A., Rosenbaum, P.F., Anagnost, S.E., Hunt, A., Abraham, J.L., Indicators of airborne fungal concentrations in urban homes: Understanding the conditions that affect indoor fungal exposures (2015) Science of the Total Environment, 517, pp. 113-124; Fernández-Rodríguez, S., Sadyś, M., Smith, M., Tormo-Molina, R., Skjøth, C.A., Maya-Manzano, J.M., Potential sources of airborne Alternaria spp. spores in South-west Spain (2015) Science of the Total Environment, 533, pp. 165-176; Fernández-Rodríguez, S., Tormo-Molina, R., Maya-Manzano, J.M., Silva-Palacios, I., Gonzalo-Garijo, Á., Outdoor airborne fungi captured by viable and nonviable methods (2014) Fungal Ecology, 7, pp. 16-26; Gonçalves, F.L.T., Bauer, H., Cardoso, M.R.A., Pukinskas, S., Matos, D., Melhem, M., Indoor and outdoor atmospheric fungal spores in the São Paulo metropolitan area (Brazil): Species and numeric concentrations (2010) International Journal of Biometeorology, 54 (4), pp. 347-355; Haas, D., Habib, J., Luxner, J., Galler, H., Zarfel, G., Schlacher, R., Comparison of background levels of culturable fungal spore concentrations in indoor and outdoor air in southeastern Austria (2014) Atmospheric Environment, 98, pp. 640-647; Hargreaves, M., Parappukkaran, S., Morawska, L., Hitchins, J., He, C., Gilbert, D., A pilot investigation into associations between indoor airborne fungal and non-biological particle concentrations in residential houses in Brisbane, Australia (2003) Science of the Total Environment, 312 (1-3), pp. 89-101; Heo, K.J., Lim, C.E., Kim, H.B., Lee, B.U., Effects of human activities on concentrations of culturable bioaerosols in indoor air environments (2017) Journal of Aerosol Science, 104, pp. 58-65; Hsu, N.-Y., Chen, P.-Y., Chang, H.-W., Su, H.-J., Changes in profiles of airborne fungi in flooded homes in southern Taiwan after Typhoon Morakot (2011) Science of the Total Environment, 409, pp. 1677-1682; Hsu, Y.-C., Kung, P.-Y., Wu, T.-N., Shen, Y.-H., Characterization of indoor-air bioaerosols in southern Taiwan (2012) Aerosol and Air Quality Research, 12, pp. 651-661; Hwang, S., Ko, Y., Park, D., Yoon, C., Seasonality in airborne bacterial, fungal, and (1 → 3)-β-D-glucan concentrations in two indoor laboratory animal rooms (2018) Journal of Clinical Pathology, 71 (1), pp. 59-66; Hwang, S.H., Lee, I.M., Yoon, C.S., Levels of total airborne bacteria, gram-negative bacteria, and endotoxin according to biosafety levels in Korean biosafety laboratories (2013) Human and Ecological Risk Assessment: An International Journal, 19 (6), pp. 1576-1585; Hwang, B.F., Liu, I.P., Huang, T.P., Molds, parental atopy and pediatric incident asthma (2011) Indoor Air, 21 (6), pp. 472-478; Hwang, S.H., Park, D.U., Ha, K.C., Cho, H.W., Yoon, C.S., Airborne bacteria concentrations and related factors at university laboratories, hospital diagnostic laboratories and a biowaste site (2011) Journal of Clinical Pathology, 64 (3), pp. 261-264; Hwang, S.H., Park, D.U., Yoon, C.S., Levels of airborne biological agents and related factors in indoor environments of fish toxicity laboratory (2017) Human and Ecological Risk Assessment: An International Journal, 23 (7), pp. 1553-1563; Information Centre, I.A.Q., A guide on indoor air quality certification scheme for offices and public places (2003) Environmental Protection Department: The Government of The Hong Kong Special Administrative Region Indoor Air Quality Management Group, , http://www.iaq.gov.hk/, Accessed 6 October 2017; Jara, D., Portnoy, J., Dhar, M., Barnes, C., Relation of indoor and outdoor airborne fungal spore levels in the Kansas City metropolitan area (2017) Allergy and Asthma Proceedings, 38 (2), pp. 130-135; Knudsen, S.M., Gunnarsen, L., Madsen, A.M., Airborne fungal species associated with mouldy and non-mouldy buildings—Effects of air change rates, humidity, and air velocity (2017) Building and Environment, 122, pp. 161-170; Lin, Z.Z., Cai, S.F., Utsugi, W., (2004) An atlas of airborne fungal spores in southern Taiwan, , Fengshan Tropical Horticultural Experiment Branch, Taiwan Agricultural Research Institute, Fengshan; Luksamijarulkul, P., Kiennukul, N., Vatthanasomboon, P., Laboratory facility design and microbial indoor air quality in selected hospital laboratories (2014) Southeast Asian Journal of Tropical Medcine and Public Health, 45 (3), pp. 746-755; Lymperopoulou, D.S., Adams, R.I., Lindow, S.E., Contribution of vegetation to the microbial composition of nearby outdoor air (2016) Applied and Environmental Microbiology, 82 (13), pp. 3822-3833; Macher, J., (1999) Bioaerosols: Assessment and Control, , ACGIH, Cincinnati, OH; Maryam, Z., Rafiqah Azira, M.R., Noor Faizul Hadry, N., Norhidayah, A., Mohd Shukri, M.A., Indoor microbial contamination through water mist aerosol at public restaurants (2015) Jurnal Teknologi (Sciences & Engineering), 77 (24), pp. 45-50; Muilenberg, M., A practical guide to aeroallergen identification (1999) American College of Allergy and Immunology Annual Meeting, , Chicago; O’Connor, D.J., Sadyś, M., Skjøth, C.A., Healy, D.A., Kennedy, R., Sodeau, J.R., Atmospheric concentrations of Alternaria, Cladosporium, Ganoderma and Didymella spores monitored in Cork (Ireland) and Worcester (England) during the summer of 2010 (2014) Aerobiologia, 30, pp. 397-411; Rajasekar, A., Balasubramanian, R., Assessment of airborne bacteria and fungi in food courts (2011) Building and Environment, 46, pp. 2081-2087; Rathnayake, C.M., Metwali, N., Jayarathne, T., Kettler, J., Huang, Y., Thorne, P.S., Influence of rain on the abundance of bioaerosols in fine and coarse particles (2017) Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 17 (3), pp. 2459-2475; Rimac, D., Macan, J., Varnai, V.M., Vucemilo, M., Matkovic´, K., Prester, L., Exposure to poultry dust and health effects in poultry workers: impact of mould and mite allergens (2010) International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, 83, pp. 9-19; Rogers, C., Muilenberg, M., Comprehensive guidelines for the operation of Hirst-type suction bioaerosol samplers (2001) The Pan-American Aerobiology Association; Rosenbaum, P.F., Crawford, J.A., Anagnost, S.E., Wang, C.J.K., Hunt, A., Anbar, R.D., Indoor airborne fungi and wheeze in the first year of life among a cohort of infants at risk for asthma (2010) Journal of Exposure Science & Environmental Epidemiology, 20, pp. 503-515; Sabariego, S., Guardia, C.D., Alba, F., The effect of meteorological factors on the daily variation of airborne fungal spores in Granada (southern Spain) (2000) International Journal of Biometeorology, 44, pp. 1-5; Sadys, M., Skjøth, C.A., Kennedy, R., Back-trajectories show export of airborne fungal spores (Ganoderma sp.) from forests to agricultural and urban areas in England (2014) Atmospheric Environment, 84, pp. 88-99; Salonen, H., Duchaine, C., Mazaheri, M., Clifford, S., Morawska, L., Airborne culturable fungi in naturally ventilated primary school environments in a subtropical climate (2015) Atmospheric Environment, 106, pp. 412-418; 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PY - 2019

Y1 - 2019

N2 - Bioaerosols are major air pollutants commonly found both indoors and outdoors. High exposure levels may result in various adverse health outcomes. Laboratories, which are indoor environments carefully designed for specific purposes, may contain high levels of bioaerosols, which may threaten worker’s health, and contaminate experimental results. This study investigated the levels of bioaerosols (i.e., culturable fungi and bacteria, and fungal spores) in laboratories in the Bangkok metropolitan area. Air samples were collected from 14 Class I and one Class II laboratories by using a single-stage impactor and a VersaTrap spore trap cassette. Colonies were counted after 72 h and 48 h of incubation for culturable fungi and bacteria, respectively. Culturable fungi and fungal spores were identified based on their morphological characteristics. Associations between bioaerosols and indoor air parameters and laboratory characteristics were evaluated. The concentrations (mean ± SD) of culturable bacteria, culturable fungi, and fungal spores were 87.0 ± 97.8 CFU/m3, 294.9 ± 376.1 CFU/m3, and 771.8 ± 545.3 spores/m3, respectively. Aspergillus/Penicillium, ascospores, and Cladosporium were common fungal spore taxa in the laboratories. Culturable fungi significantly increased with the number of staff and visible molds, whereas water leaks and culturable fungi significantly increased fungal spore concentrations. Culturable bacteria were positively associated with the numbers of trash bins and − 80 °C freezers. Although bioaerosol concentrations were considerably lower in the studied laboratories, proper indoor air management is still suggested in order to reduce emissions and exposure. This can help workers avoid adverse health outcomes and reduce the chance of experimental contamination. © 2018, Springer Nature B.V.

AB - Bioaerosols are major air pollutants commonly found both indoors and outdoors. High exposure levels may result in various adverse health outcomes. Laboratories, which are indoor environments carefully designed for specific purposes, may contain high levels of bioaerosols, which may threaten worker’s health, and contaminate experimental results. This study investigated the levels of bioaerosols (i.e., culturable fungi and bacteria, and fungal spores) in laboratories in the Bangkok metropolitan area. Air samples were collected from 14 Class I and one Class II laboratories by using a single-stage impactor and a VersaTrap spore trap cassette. Colonies were counted after 72 h and 48 h of incubation for culturable fungi and bacteria, respectively. Culturable fungi and fungal spores were identified based on their morphological characteristics. Associations between bioaerosols and indoor air parameters and laboratory characteristics were evaluated. The concentrations (mean ± SD) of culturable bacteria, culturable fungi, and fungal spores were 87.0 ± 97.8 CFU/m3, 294.9 ± 376.1 CFU/m3, and 771.8 ± 545.3 spores/m3, respectively. Aspergillus/Penicillium, ascospores, and Cladosporium were common fungal spore taxa in the laboratories. Culturable fungi significantly increased with the number of staff and visible molds, whereas water leaks and culturable fungi significantly increased fungal spore concentrations. Culturable bacteria were positively associated with the numbers of trash bins and − 80 °C freezers. Although bioaerosol concentrations were considerably lower in the studied laboratories, proper indoor air management is still suggested in order to reduce emissions and exposure. This can help workers avoid adverse health outcomes and reduce the chance of experimental contamination. © 2018, Springer Nature B.V.

KW - Bacteria

KW - Bioaerosols

KW - Fungal spore

KW - Fungi

KW - Indoor air quality

KW - Laboratory

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85053448833&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85053448833&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s10453-018-9535-5

DO - 10.1007/s10453-018-9535-5

M3 - Article

JO - Aerobiologia

JF - Aerobiologia

SN - 0393-5965

ER -