Benzodiazepine Use and Risk of Dementia in the Elderly Population: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

Md Mohaimenul Islam, Usman Iqbal, Bruno Walther, Suleman Atique, Navneet Kumar Dubey, Phung Anh Nguyen, Tahmina Nasrin Poly, Jakir Hossain Bhuiyan Masud, Yu Chuan Li, Syed Abdul Shabbir

研究成果: 雜誌貢獻文章

42 引文 (Scopus)

摘要

Background: Benzodiazepines are a widely used medication in developed countries, particularly among elderly patients. However, benzodiazepines are known to affect memory and cognition and might thus enhance the risk of dementia. The objective of this review is to synthesize evidence from observational studies that evaluated the association between benzodiazepines use and dementia risk. Summary: We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of controlled observational studies to evaluate the risk of benzodiazepines use on dementia outcome. All control observational studies that compared dementia outcome in patients with benzodiazepine use with a control group were included. We calculated pooled ORs using a random-effects model. Ten studies (of 3,696 studies identified) were included in the systematic review, of which 8 studies were included in random-effects meta-analysis and sensitivity analyses. Odds of dementia were 78% higher in those who used benzodiazepines compared with those who did not use benzodiazepines (OR 1.78; 95% CI 1.33-2.38). In subgroup analysis, the higher association was still found in the studies from Asia (OR 2.40; 95% CI 1.66-3.47) whereas a moderate association was observed in the studies from North America and Europe (OR 1.49; 95% CI 1.34-1.65 and OR 1.43; 95% CI 1.16-1.75). Also, diabetics, hypertension, cardiac disease, and statin drugs were associated with increased risk of dementia but negative association was observed in the case of body mass index. There was significant statistical and clinical heterogeneity among studies for the main analysis and most of the sensitivity analyses. There was significant statistical and clinical heterogeneity among the studies for the main analysis and most of the sensitivity analyses. Key Messages: Our results suggest that benzodiazepine use is significantly associated with dementia risk. However, observational studies cannot clarify whether the observed epidemiologic association is a causal effect or the result of some unmeasured confounding variable. Therefore, more research is needed.
原文英語
頁(從 - 到)181-191
頁數11
期刊Neuroepidemiology
DOIs
出版狀態已發佈 - 2017

指紋

Benzodiazepines
Dementia
Meta-Analysis
Population
Observational Studies
Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
North America
Developed Countries
Cognition
Heart Diseases
Body Mass Index
Hypertension
Control Groups
Research
Pharmaceutical Preparations

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Clinical Neurology

引用此文

Benzodiazepine Use and Risk of Dementia in the Elderly Population : A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. / Islam, Md Mohaimenul; Iqbal, Usman; Walther, Bruno; Atique, Suleman; Dubey, Navneet Kumar; Nguyen, Phung Anh; Poly, Tahmina Nasrin; Masud, Jakir Hossain Bhuiyan; Li, Yu Chuan; Shabbir, Syed Abdul.

於: Neuroepidemiology, 2017, p. 181-191.

研究成果: 雜誌貢獻文章

Islam, Md Mohaimenul ; Iqbal, Usman ; Walther, Bruno ; Atique, Suleman ; Dubey, Navneet Kumar ; Nguyen, Phung Anh ; Poly, Tahmina Nasrin ; Masud, Jakir Hossain Bhuiyan ; Li, Yu Chuan ; Shabbir, Syed Abdul. / Benzodiazepine Use and Risk of Dementia in the Elderly Population : A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. 於: Neuroepidemiology. 2017 ; 頁 181-191.
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abstract = "Background: Benzodiazepines are a widely used medication in developed countries, particularly among elderly patients. However, benzodiazepines are known to affect memory and cognition and might thus enhance the risk of dementia. The objective of this review is to synthesize evidence from observational studies that evaluated the association between benzodiazepines use and dementia risk. Summary: We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of controlled observational studies to evaluate the risk of benzodiazepines use on dementia outcome. All control observational studies that compared dementia outcome in patients with benzodiazepine use with a control group were included. We calculated pooled ORs using a random-effects model. Ten studies (of 3,696 studies identified) were included in the systematic review, of which 8 studies were included in random-effects meta-analysis and sensitivity analyses. Odds of dementia were 78{\%} higher in those who used benzodiazepines compared with those who did not use benzodiazepines (OR 1.78; 95{\%} CI 1.33-2.38). In subgroup analysis, the higher association was still found in the studies from Asia (OR 2.40; 95{\%} CI 1.66-3.47) whereas a moderate association was observed in the studies from North America and Europe (OR 1.49; 95{\%} CI 1.34-1.65 and OR 1.43; 95{\%} CI 1.16-1.75). Also, diabetics, hypertension, cardiac disease, and statin drugs were associated with increased risk of dementia but negative association was observed in the case of body mass index. There was significant statistical and clinical heterogeneity among studies for the main analysis and most of the sensitivity analyses. There was significant statistical and clinical heterogeneity among the studies for the main analysis and most of the sensitivity analyses. Key Messages: Our results suggest that benzodiazepine use is significantly associated with dementia risk. However, observational studies cannot clarify whether the observed epidemiologic association is a causal effect or the result of some unmeasured confounding variable. Therefore, more research is needed.",
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AU - Islam, Md Mohaimenul

AU - Iqbal, Usman

AU - Walther, Bruno

AU - Atique, Suleman

AU - Dubey, Navneet Kumar

AU - Nguyen, Phung Anh

AU - Poly, Tahmina Nasrin

AU - Masud, Jakir Hossain Bhuiyan

AU - Li, Yu Chuan

AU - Shabbir, Syed Abdul

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N2 - Background: Benzodiazepines are a widely used medication in developed countries, particularly among elderly patients. However, benzodiazepines are known to affect memory and cognition and might thus enhance the risk of dementia. The objective of this review is to synthesize evidence from observational studies that evaluated the association between benzodiazepines use and dementia risk. Summary: We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of controlled observational studies to evaluate the risk of benzodiazepines use on dementia outcome. All control observational studies that compared dementia outcome in patients with benzodiazepine use with a control group were included. We calculated pooled ORs using a random-effects model. Ten studies (of 3,696 studies identified) were included in the systematic review, of which 8 studies were included in random-effects meta-analysis and sensitivity analyses. Odds of dementia were 78% higher in those who used benzodiazepines compared with those who did not use benzodiazepines (OR 1.78; 95% CI 1.33-2.38). In subgroup analysis, the higher association was still found in the studies from Asia (OR 2.40; 95% CI 1.66-3.47) whereas a moderate association was observed in the studies from North America and Europe (OR 1.49; 95% CI 1.34-1.65 and OR 1.43; 95% CI 1.16-1.75). Also, diabetics, hypertension, cardiac disease, and statin drugs were associated with increased risk of dementia but negative association was observed in the case of body mass index. There was significant statistical and clinical heterogeneity among studies for the main analysis and most of the sensitivity analyses. There was significant statistical and clinical heterogeneity among the studies for the main analysis and most of the sensitivity analyses. Key Messages: Our results suggest that benzodiazepine use is significantly associated with dementia risk. However, observational studies cannot clarify whether the observed epidemiologic association is a causal effect or the result of some unmeasured confounding variable. Therefore, more research is needed.

AB - Background: Benzodiazepines are a widely used medication in developed countries, particularly among elderly patients. However, benzodiazepines are known to affect memory and cognition and might thus enhance the risk of dementia. The objective of this review is to synthesize evidence from observational studies that evaluated the association between benzodiazepines use and dementia risk. Summary: We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of controlled observational studies to evaluate the risk of benzodiazepines use on dementia outcome. All control observational studies that compared dementia outcome in patients with benzodiazepine use with a control group were included. We calculated pooled ORs using a random-effects model. Ten studies (of 3,696 studies identified) were included in the systematic review, of which 8 studies were included in random-effects meta-analysis and sensitivity analyses. Odds of dementia were 78% higher in those who used benzodiazepines compared with those who did not use benzodiazepines (OR 1.78; 95% CI 1.33-2.38). In subgroup analysis, the higher association was still found in the studies from Asia (OR 2.40; 95% CI 1.66-3.47) whereas a moderate association was observed in the studies from North America and Europe (OR 1.49; 95% CI 1.34-1.65 and OR 1.43; 95% CI 1.16-1.75). Also, diabetics, hypertension, cardiac disease, and statin drugs were associated with increased risk of dementia but negative association was observed in the case of body mass index. There was significant statistical and clinical heterogeneity among studies for the main analysis and most of the sensitivity analyses. There was significant statistical and clinical heterogeneity among the studies for the main analysis and most of the sensitivity analyses. Key Messages: Our results suggest that benzodiazepine use is significantly associated with dementia risk. However, observational studies cannot clarify whether the observed epidemiologic association is a causal effect or the result of some unmeasured confounding variable. Therefore, more research is needed.

KW - Benzodiazepines

KW - Dementia

KW - Diabetic

KW - Heterogeneity

KW - Hypertension

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