Association Between Psoriasis and Dementia

A Population-Based Case-Control Study

研究成果: 雜誌貢獻文章

摘要

Background: Dementia is a syndrome that involves the deterioration of several higher mental functions in advanced age, and psoriasis is an autoimmune disease characterized by skin plaque. Epidemiological studies have indicated an association between dementia and psoriasis; however, to date, no studies in Asia have reported this association. Objective: This study used a population-based medical dataset to explore the association between previously diagnosed psoriasis and dementia in Taiwan. Methods: Using the Taiwan Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2000, we identified 7118 individuals with a diagnosis of dementia; a further 21,354 sex- and aged-matched individuals were randomly extracted as controls. Patients with bullous pemphigoid, which is characterized by inflammatory phenomena similar to that evident in psoriasis, were chosen as a control group. Conditional logistic regression was performed to evaluate the association between dementia and prior psoriasis or bullous pemphigoid among the sampled patients. Results: Of the 28,472 individuals, 2.2, 3.0, and 1.5% of the total, case, and control groups, respectively, had been diagnosed with psoriasis. After adjustments were made for patients’ monthly income, region, urbanization level, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, hypertension, and coronary heart disease, the odds ratio (OR) of diagnosed psoriasis for the case group was 1.46 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.23–1.73; p < 0.001) compared with the control group. The ORs of a previous psoriasis diagnosis with arthritis and without arthritis in the case group were, respectively, 1.95 and 1.44 times (95% CI 1.03–3.89 and 1.21–1.72, respectively) those of the control group after adjustments for socioeconomic variables, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, hypertension, and coronary heart disease. However, no significant differences in prior bullous pemphigoid were observed between the dementia and control groups (0.5% and 0.4%, respectively). Conclusions: More patients with dementia had prior psoriasis than did patients in the control group. Additional research is required to confirm our results and clarify the relationship.

原文英語
頁(從 - 到)457-463
頁數7
期刊American Journal of Clinical Dermatology
20
發行號3
早期上線日期一月 16 2019
DOIs
出版狀態已發佈 - 六月 1 2019

指紋

Psoriasis
Dementia
Case-Control Studies
Population
Bullous Pemphigoid
Control Groups
Hyperlipidemias
Taiwan
Arthritis
Coronary Disease
Confidence Intervals
Hypertension
Social Adjustment
Urbanization
Health Insurance
Autoimmune Diseases
Epidemiologic Studies
Logistic Models
Odds Ratio
Databases

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology

引用此文

Association Between Psoriasis and Dementia : A Population-Based Case-Control Study. / Lin, Ching-Chun; Lin, Herng-Ching; Chiu, Hung-Wen.

於: American Journal of Clinical Dermatology, 卷 20, 編號 3, 01.06.2019, p. 457-463.

研究成果: 雜誌貢獻文章

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title = "Association Between Psoriasis and Dementia: A Population-Based Case-Control Study",
abstract = "Background: Dementia is a syndrome that involves the deterioration of several higher mental functions in advanced age, and psoriasis is an autoimmune disease characterized by skin plaque. Epidemiological studies have indicated an association between dementia and psoriasis; however, to date, no studies in Asia have reported this association. Objective: This study used a population-based medical dataset to explore the association between previously diagnosed psoriasis and dementia in Taiwan. Methods: Using the Taiwan Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2000, we identified 7118 individuals with a diagnosis of dementia; a further 21,354 sex- and aged-matched individuals were randomly extracted as controls. Patients with bullous pemphigoid, which is characterized by inflammatory phenomena similar to that evident in psoriasis, were chosen as a control group. Conditional logistic regression was performed to evaluate the association between dementia and prior psoriasis or bullous pemphigoid among the sampled patients. Results: Of the 28,472 individuals, 2.2, 3.0, and 1.5{\%} of the total, case, and control groups, respectively, had been diagnosed with psoriasis. After adjustments were made for patients’ monthly income, region, urbanization level, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, hypertension, and coronary heart disease, the odds ratio (OR) of diagnosed psoriasis for the case group was 1.46 (95{\%} confidence interval [CI] 1.23–1.73; p < 0.001) compared with the control group. The ORs of a previous psoriasis diagnosis with arthritis and without arthritis in the case group were, respectively, 1.95 and 1.44 times (95{\%} CI 1.03–3.89 and 1.21–1.72, respectively) those of the control group after adjustments for socioeconomic variables, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, hypertension, and coronary heart disease. However, no significant differences in prior bullous pemphigoid were observed between the dementia and control groups (0.5{\%} and 0.4{\%}, respectively). Conclusions: More patients with dementia had prior psoriasis than did patients in the control group. Additional research is required to confirm our results and clarify the relationship.",
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