Abdominal auras in patients with mesial temporal sclerosis

Yi-Chun Kuan, Yang Hsin Shih, Chien Chen, Hsiang Yu Yu, Chun Hing Yiu, Yung Yang Lin, Shang Yeong Kwan, Der Jen Yen

研究成果: 雜誌貢獻文章

5 引文 (Scopus)

摘要

To better clarify abdominal auras and their clinical correlates, we enrolled 331 temporal lobe epilepsy patients who received surgical treatment. Detailed descriptions of their auras were obtained before surgery and reconfirmed during postoperative outpatient follow-ups. Pathology revealed mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS) in 256 patients (77.3%) and 75 non-MTS. Of 214 MTS patients with auras, 78 (36.4%) reported abdominal auras (vs. 30.4% in non-MTS, p=0.439): 42 with left-sided seizure onset, and 36 with right-sided seizure onset. Moreover, 49 of the 78 MTS patients had abdominal auras accompanied by rising sensations (vs. 2 of 14 in non-MTS group, p=0.004). The "rising air" was initially described to locate to the epigastric (47.8%) or periumbilical area (45.7%) and mostly reached the chest (40.4%) or remained in the abdominal region (27.1%). An epigastric location of "rising air" favored a left-sided seizure onset, and non-epigastric areas favored right-sided seizure onset (p=0.018). Finally, we found that abdominal auras with or without rising sensations did not predict postoperative seizure outcomes.
原文英語
頁(從 - 到)386-390
頁數5
期刊Epilepsy and Behavior
25
發行號3
DOIs
出版狀態已發佈 - 十一月 2012

指紋

Sclerosis
Epilepsy
Seizures
Air
Temporal Lobe Epilepsy
Outpatients
Thorax
Pathology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Behavioral Neuroscience
  • Neurology

引用此文

Kuan, Y-C., Shih, Y. H., Chen, C., Yu, H. Y., Yiu, C. H., Lin, Y. Y., ... Yen, D. J. (2012). Abdominal auras in patients with mesial temporal sclerosis. Epilepsy and Behavior, 25(3), 386-390. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.yebeh.2012.07.034

Abdominal auras in patients with mesial temporal sclerosis. / Kuan, Yi-Chun; Shih, Yang Hsin; Chen, Chien; Yu, Hsiang Yu; Yiu, Chun Hing; Lin, Yung Yang; Kwan, Shang Yeong; Yen, Der Jen.

於: Epilepsy and Behavior, 卷 25, 編號 3, 11.2012, p. 386-390.

研究成果: 雜誌貢獻文章

Kuan, Y-C, Shih, YH, Chen, C, Yu, HY, Yiu, CH, Lin, YY, Kwan, SY & Yen, DJ 2012, 'Abdominal auras in patients with mesial temporal sclerosis', Epilepsy and Behavior, 卷 25, 編號 3, 頁 386-390. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.yebeh.2012.07.034
Kuan, Yi-Chun ; Shih, Yang Hsin ; Chen, Chien ; Yu, Hsiang Yu ; Yiu, Chun Hing ; Lin, Yung Yang ; Kwan, Shang Yeong ; Yen, Der Jen. / Abdominal auras in patients with mesial temporal sclerosis. 於: Epilepsy and Behavior. 2012 ; 卷 25, 編號 3. 頁 386-390.
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abstract = "To better clarify abdominal auras and their clinical correlates, we enrolled 331 temporal lobe epilepsy patients who received surgical treatment. Detailed descriptions of their auras were obtained before surgery and reconfirmed during postoperative outpatient follow-ups. Pathology revealed mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS) in 256 patients (77.3{\%}) and 75 non-MTS. Of 214 MTS patients with auras, 78 (36.4{\%}) reported abdominal auras (vs. 30.4{\%} in non-MTS, p=0.439): 42 with left-sided seizure onset, and 36 with right-sided seizure onset. Moreover, 49 of the 78 MTS patients had abdominal auras accompanied by rising sensations (vs. 2 of 14 in non-MTS group, p=0.004). The {"}rising air{"} was initially described to locate to the epigastric (47.8{\%}) or periumbilical area (45.7{\%}) and mostly reached the chest (40.4{\%}) or remained in the abdominal region (27.1{\%}). An epigastric location of {"}rising air{"} favored a left-sided seizure onset, and non-epigastric areas favored right-sided seizure onset (p=0.018). Finally, we found that abdominal auras with or without rising sensations did not predict postoperative seizure outcomes.",
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