A longitudinal study of risk factors for motorcycle crashes among junior college students in Taiwan

Mau Roung Lin, Shu Hui Chang, Lu Pai, Penelope M. Keyl

研究成果: 雜誌貢獻文章

81 引文 (Scopus)

摘要

A cohort of 4729 junior college students in an urban and a rural area in Taiwan was followed up for a period of 20 months. Students' characteristics, including riding exposures, as well as human, vehicular, and environmental factors were collected using one initial and three follow-up questionnaires. The Anderson-Gill (AG) multiplicative intensity model was used to determine the risk of a motorcycle crash over time while also allowing for the modeling of multiple events. The average response rate for the four assessments was 92%. The adjusted relative hazard (RH) for students living in the rural as opposed to the urban area for crashes was 1.67 at the beginning of the study but decreased to 0.66 by the end. Past motorcycle crash history, number of riding days, average riding distance, risk-taking level, alcohol consumption, and traffic violations were all significantly associated with an increased risk of being involved in a crash. Conversely, increasing age, riding experience, and automobile licensure were related to a decreased risk of crashing. Furthermore, helmet use was not independently related to the risk of crashing. In conclusion, a high-risk group predisposed to involvement in a motorcycle crash, including both non-injury and injury-related crashes, can be identified using selected risk factors for crash prevention among young riders.

原文英語
頁(從 - 到)243-252
頁數10
期刊Accident Analysis and Prevention
35
發行號2
DOIs
出版狀態已發佈 - 三月 2003

指紋

Motorcycles
motorcycle
Taiwan
Longitudinal Studies
longitudinal study
Students
student
Head Protective Devices
Automobiles
Licensure
Risk-Taking
Alcohol Drinking
History
alcohol consumption
motor vehicle
environmental factors
Hazards
urban area
rural area
Alcohols

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemical Health and Safety
  • Safety, Risk, Reliability and Quality
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Human Factors and Ergonomics
  • Law
  • Safety Research
  • Transportation

引用此文

A longitudinal study of risk factors for motorcycle crashes among junior college students in Taiwan. / Lin, Mau Roung; Chang, Shu Hui; Pai, Lu; Keyl, Penelope M.

於: Accident Analysis and Prevention, 卷 35, 編號 2, 03.2003, p. 243-252.

研究成果: 雜誌貢獻文章

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