We (sometimes) know not how we feel: Predicting job performance with an implicit measure of trait affectivity

Russell E. Johnson, Anna L. Tolentino, Ozgun B. Rodopman, Eunae Cho

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

47 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this study we examined relationships between trait affectivity and work performance. However, because trait affectivity is believed to operate primarily outside awareness, we assessed it using techniques designed to measure content at explicit and implicit levels. Although results were consistent across the explicit and implicit measures (i.e., positive affectivity was positively related to task performance and citizenship behavior, whereas negative affectivity was negatively related to task performance and positively related to counterproductive behavior), the implicit measure predicted greater proportions of variance in supervisor-rated criteria and did so incremental to the explicit measure. We discuss the implications of these results for theory and practice, and highlight the potential usefulness of implicit measures for applied research.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)197-219
Number of pages23
JournalPersonnel Psychology
Volume63
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2010
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology
  • Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management

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