Volume-Outcome Relation for Acute Appendicitis: Evidence from a Nationwide Population-Based Study

Po Li Wei, Shih Ping Liu, Joseph J. Keller, Herng Ching Lin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Although procedures like appendectomy have been studied extensively, the relative importance of each surgeon's surgical volume-to-ruptured appendicitis has not been explored. The purpose of this study was to investigate the rate of ruptured appendicitis by surgeon-volume groups as a measure of quality of care for appendicitis by using a nationwide population-based dataset. Methods: We identified 65,339 first-time hospitalizations with a discharge diagnosis of acute appendicitis (International Classification of Disease, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) codes 540, 540.0, 540.1 and 540.9) between January 2007 and December 2009. We used "whether or not a patient had a perforated appendicitis" as the outcome measure. A conditional (fixed-effect) logistic regression model was performed to explore the odds of perforated appendicitis among surgeon case volume groups. Results: Patients treated by low-volume surgeons had significantly higher morbidity rates than those treated by high-volume (28.1% vs. 26.15, p

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere52539
JournalPLoS One
Volume7
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 29 2012

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Appendicitis
surgeons
Logistics
Population
International Classification of Diseases
Logistic Models
Appendectomy
Quality of Health Care
morbidity
Hospitalization
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Morbidity
Surgeons

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Volume-Outcome Relation for Acute Appendicitis : Evidence from a Nationwide Population-Based Study. / Wei, Po Li; Liu, Shih Ping; Keller, Joseph J.; Lin, Herng Ching.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 7, No. 12, e52539, 29.12.2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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