Validity, Sensitivity, and Responsiveness of the 11-Face Faces Pain Scale to Postoperative Pain in Adult Orthopedic Surgery Patients

Nguyen Van Giang, Hsiao-Yean Chiu, Duong Hong Thai, Shu-Yu Kuo, Pei-Shan Tsai

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Pain is common in patients after orthopedic surgery. The 11-face Faces Pain Scale has not been validated for use in adult patients with postoperative pain. To assess the validity of the 11-face Faces Pain Scale and its ability to detect responses to pain medications, and to determine whether the sensitivity of the 11-face Faces Pain Scale for detecting changes in pain intensity over time is associated with gender differences in adult postorthopedic surgery patients. The 11-face Faces Pain Scale was translated into Vietnamese using forward and back translation. Postoperative pain was assessed using an 11-point numerical rating scale and the 11-face Faces Pain Scale on the day of surgery, and before (Time 1) and every 30 minutes after (Times 2-5) the patients had taken pain medications on the first postoperative day. The 11-face Faces Pain Scale highly correlated with the numerical rating scale (r = 0.78, p <.001). When the scores from each follow-up test (Times 2-5) were compared with those from the baseline test (Time 1), the effect sizes were -0.70, -1.05, -1.20, and -1.31, and the standardized response means were -1.17, -1.59, -1.66, and -1.82, respectively. The mean change in pain intensity, but not gender-time interaction effect, over the five time points was significant (F = 182.03, p <.001). Our results support that the 11-face Faces Pain Scale is appropriate for measuring acute postoperative pain in adults.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)678-684
Number of pages7
JournalPain Management Nursing
Volume16
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 1 2015

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Facial Pain
Postoperative Pain
Orthopedics
Pain
Aptitude
Acute Pain
Ambulatory Surgical Procedures
Reproducibility of Results

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Advanced and Specialised Nursing

Cite this

Validity, Sensitivity, and Responsiveness of the 11-Face Faces Pain Scale to Postoperative Pain in Adult Orthopedic Surgery Patients. / Van Giang, Nguyen; Chiu, Hsiao-Yean; Thai, Duong Hong; Kuo, Shu-Yu; Tsai, Pei-Shan.

In: Pain Management Nursing, Vol. 16, No. 5, 01.10.2015, p. 678-684.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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