Validation of the short-form Health Literacy Scale in patients with stroke

Yi Jing Huang, Yu Lin Wang, Tzu Yi Wu, Cheng Te Chen, Ken N. Kuo, Sheng Shiung Chen, Wen Hsuan Hou, Ching Lin Hsieh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We aimed to validate a Mandarin version of the short-form Health Literacy Scale (SHEAL) in patients with stroke. Methods: Each patient with stroke was interviewed with the SHEAL. The Public Stroke Knowledge Quiz (PSKQ) was administered as a criterion for examining the convergent validity of the SHEAL. The discriminative validity of the SHEAL was determined with age and education level as independent grouping variables. Results: A total of 87 patients with stroke volunteered to participate in this prospective study. The SHEAL demonstrated sufficient internal consistency reliability (alpha. =. 0.82) and high correlation with the PSKQ (. r=. 0.62). The SHEAL scores between different age groups and education level groups were significantly different. The SHEAL, however, showed a notable ceiling effect (24.1% of the participants), indicating that the SHEAL cannot differentiate level of health literacy between individuals with high health literacy. Conclusion: The internal consistency reliability, convergent validity, and discriminative validity of the SHEAL were adequate. However, the internal consistency reliability and ceiling effect of the SHEAL need to be improved. Practice implications: The SHEAL has shown its potential for assessing the health literacy of patients with stroke for research purposes. For clinical usage, however, the SHEAL should be used with caution.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)762-770
Number of pages9
JournalPatient Education and Counseling
Volume98
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 1 2015

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Health Literacy
Stroke
Education

Keywords

  • Health literacy
  • Measurement
  • Psychometrics
  • Stroke
  • Validation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Huang, Y. J., Wang, Y. L., Wu, T. Y., Chen, C. T., Kuo, K. N., Chen, S. S., ... Hsieh, C. L. (2015). Validation of the short-form Health Literacy Scale in patients with stroke. Patient Education and Counseling, 98(6), 762-770. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pec.2015.02.021

Validation of the short-form Health Literacy Scale in patients with stroke. / Huang, Yi Jing; Wang, Yu Lin; Wu, Tzu Yi; Chen, Cheng Te; Kuo, Ken N.; Chen, Sheng Shiung; Hou, Wen Hsuan; Hsieh, Ching Lin.

In: Patient Education and Counseling, Vol. 98, No. 6, 01.06.2015, p. 762-770.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Huang, YJ, Wang, YL, Wu, TY, Chen, CT, Kuo, KN, Chen, SS, Hou, WH & Hsieh, CL 2015, 'Validation of the short-form Health Literacy Scale in patients with stroke', Patient Education and Counseling, vol. 98, no. 6, pp. 762-770. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pec.2015.02.021
Huang, Yi Jing ; Wang, Yu Lin ; Wu, Tzu Yi ; Chen, Cheng Te ; Kuo, Ken N. ; Chen, Sheng Shiung ; Hou, Wen Hsuan ; Hsieh, Ching Lin. / Validation of the short-form Health Literacy Scale in patients with stroke. In: Patient Education and Counseling. 2015 ; Vol. 98, No. 6. pp. 762-770.
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