Using white blood cell counts to predict metabolic syndrome in the elderly: A combined cross-sectional and longitudinal study

Chun Pei, Jin Biou Chang, Chang Hsun Hsieh, Jiunn Diann Lin, Chun Hsien Hsu, Dee Pei, Yao Jen Liang, Yen Lin Chen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Metabolic syndrome (MetS) has an important implication from a preventive medicine perspective as early recognition and intervention will reduce associated mortality and morbidity. To better identify patients at risk for developing MetS and cardiovascular disease, we conduct a combined cross-sectional and longitudinal study to shed light on the elevated white blood cell (WBC) level in elderly. Methods: A total of 10,463 subjects were eligible for analysis. In the first stage of study, subjects were enrolled in the cross-sectional study to find out not only the correlation between WBC and MetS but also the optimal cut-off value of WBC with higher chances to have MetS. In the second stage of current study, subjects with MetS at baseline were excluded from the same study group, and performed a median 6.8-year longitudinal study to validate the optimal cut-off value of WBC predicting MetS. Results: WBC is significantly higher in the group with than without MetS in both genders. All MetS components were associated with WBC in multivariate analysis except diastolic blood pressure and fasting plasma glucose. In the longitudinal study, WBC showed to be a good predictor of MetS in both genders. Conclusion: WBC is a good marker to identify the high risk subjects having MetS in the current status or in the future. Elderly with a higher WBC and without any underlying chronic diseases should receive more attention on the potential to develop MetS.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)324-329
Number of pages6
JournalEuropean Journal of Internal Medicine
Volume26
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 1 2015

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Leukocyte Count
Longitudinal Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Leukocytes
Blood Pressure
Preventive Medicine
Metabolic Diseases
Fasting
Chronic Disease
Cardiovascular Diseases
Multivariate Analysis
Morbidity
Glucose
Mortality

Keywords

  • Elderly
  • Longitudinal
  • Metabolic syndrome
  • White blood cell

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine

Cite this

Using white blood cell counts to predict metabolic syndrome in the elderly : A combined cross-sectional and longitudinal study. / Pei, Chun; Chang, Jin Biou; Hsieh, Chang Hsun; Lin, Jiunn Diann; Hsu, Chun Hsien; Pei, Dee; Liang, Yao Jen; Chen, Yen Lin.

In: European Journal of Internal Medicine, Vol. 26, No. 5, 01.06.2015, p. 324-329.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Pei, Chun ; Chang, Jin Biou ; Hsieh, Chang Hsun ; Lin, Jiunn Diann ; Hsu, Chun Hsien ; Pei, Dee ; Liang, Yao Jen ; Chen, Yen Lin. / Using white blood cell counts to predict metabolic syndrome in the elderly : A combined cross-sectional and longitudinal study. In: European Journal of Internal Medicine. 2015 ; Vol. 26, No. 5. pp. 324-329.
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