Usefulness of Circulating Decoy Receptor 3 in Predicting Coronary Artery Disease Severity and Future Major Adverse Cardiovascular Events in Patients with Multivessel Coronary Artery Disease

Ting Yung Chang, Chien Yi Hsu, Po Hsun Huang, Chia Hung Chiang, Hsin Bang Leu, Chin Chou Huang, Jaw Wen Chen, Shing Jong Lin

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Decoy receptor 3 (DcR3), a member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily, is an antiapoptotic soluble receptor considered to play an important role in immune modulation and has pro-inflammatory functions. This study was designed to test whether circulating DcR3 levels are associated with coronary artery disease (CAD) severity and predict future major adverse cardiovascular events (MACEs) in patients with CAD. Circulating DcR3 levels and the Syntax score (SXscore) were determined in patients with multivessel CAD. The primary end point was the MACE within 12 months. In total, 152 consecutive patients with angiographically confirmed multivessel CAD who had received percutaneous coronary intervention were enrolled and were divided into 3 groups according to CAD lesion severity. Group 1 was defined as low SXscore (≤13), group 2 as intermediate SXscore (>13 and ≤22), and group 3 as high SXscore (>22). DcR3 levels were significantly higher in the high SXscore group than the other 2 groups (13,602 ± 7,256 vs 8,025 ± 7,789 vs 4,637 ± 4,403 pg/ml, p <0.001). By multivariate analysis, circulating DcR3 levels were identified as an independent predictor for high SXscore (adjusted odds ratio 1.15, 95% confidence interval 1.09 to 1.21; p <0.001). The Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that increased circulating DcR3 levels are associated with enhanced 1-year MACE in patients with multivessel CAD (log-rank p <0.001). In conclusion, increased circulating DcR3 levels are associated with CAD severity and predict future MACE in patients with multivessel CAD.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1028-1033
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Cardiology
Volume116
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 1 2015
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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