Urban air pollution and emergency admissions for cerebrovascular diseases in Taipei, Taiwan

Chang Chuan Chan, Kai Jen Chuang, Lung Chang Chien, Wen Jone Chen, Wei Tien Chang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

98 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aims: This study was designed to evaluate the association between urban air pollutants and emergency admissions for cerebrovascular diseases. Methods and results: Daily emergency admissions for cerebrovascular diseases (ICD-9-CM, 430-437) to the National Taiwan University Hospital were regressed against daily concentrations of carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), sulphur dioxide (SO2), ozone (O3), and particulate matters with aerodynamic diameter 2.5) and 10 μm (PM 10) from 12 April 1997 to 31 December 2002 in Taipei metropolitan areas by the Poisson regression models adjusting for meteorological conditions and temporal trends. Single-pollutant models showed O3 lagged 0 day, CO lagged 2 days, and PM2.5 and PM10 lagged 3 days were significantly associated with increasing emergency admissions for cerebrovascular diseases and CO lagged 2 days was significantly associated with increasing emergency admissions for strokes (ICD-9-CM, 430-434). Such association remained significant for O3, CO, and cerebrovascular admissions after adjusting for PM2.5 and PM10 in two-pollutant models. The odds ratios were 1.021-1.022 per 31.3 ppb O 3 and 1.023-1.031 per 0.8 ppm CO, respectively. However, only CO was significantly associated with emergency admissions for stroke in the three-pollutant models with CO, O3, and PM2.5 or PM 10. Conclusion: Emergency admissions for cerebrovascular diseases among adults were positively associated with increasing urban air pollution levels of O3 lagged 0 day and CO lagged 2 days in Taipei.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1238-1244
Number of pages7
JournalEuropean Heart Journal
Volume27
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2006
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Air pollution
  • Carbon monoxide
  • Cerebrovascular diseases
  • Epidemiology
  • Participate matters
  • Stroke

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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