Trends in child and adolescent injury mortality in Taiwan, 1986-2006

W. U Chien Chien, Lu Pai, Chi Ming Chu, Senyeong Kao, Shin Han Tsai

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: To describe national trends in injury mortality rates for Taiwanese children aged 0-19 from 1986 to 2006. Methods: Data were obtained from the official Vital Statistics System of the Department of Health, Executive Yuan. Injuries were classified by intent and mechanism using ICD-9 criteria. Mortality rates were age-adjusted for each year's standard population. Simple linear regression was used to determine the trends. Results: From 1986 to 2006, the mortality rate per 100,000 for unintentional injuries at ages 0-19 declined by 63% (from 35.3 to 13.2) and the suicide rate declined by almost half (from 1.9 to 1.0). The homicide rate for ages 0-19 combined declined but the homicide rate for children under age 5 increased. Except for homicide in young children, all age groups showed decreasing trends. The 15-19 age group had the highest total death rate due to injury and accounted for 52% of all injury deaths. Motor vehicle injuries (MVI) were the most common cause of death (accounting for 50% of all injury deaths), followed by drowning (17%), suffocation (7%), fire and flames (4%), falls (4%) and poisoning (2%). Suffocation caused 68% of injury deaths in infants. Conclusions: After 1989, the mortality rates for unintentional injuries and suicide declined, but the homicide rate for young children increased. Laws to prevent violence in the home must be enforced, and drowning prevention programs implemented and incorporated into the Children and Adolescent Safety Implementation Program. Preventive efforts should also target MVI and suicide in the 15-19 age group, drowning at all ages, and suffocation and homicide for infants and children under 5 years of age.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)22-32
Number of pages11
JournalTaiwan Journal of Public Health
Volume29
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2010

Fingerprint

Taiwan
Mortality
Homicide
Wounds and Injuries
Asphyxia
Suicide
Age Groups
Motor Vehicles
Vital Statistics
International Classification of Diseases
Violence
Poisoning
Cause of Death
Linear Models
Safety
Health

Keywords

  • Children
  • Injury
  • Mortality
  • Trends

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Trends in child and adolescent injury mortality in Taiwan, 1986-2006. / Chien, W. U Chien; Pai, Lu; Chu, Chi Ming; Kao, Senyeong; Tsai, Shin Han.

In: Taiwan Journal of Public Health, Vol. 29, No. 1, 02.2010, p. 22-32.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Chien, WUC, Pai, L, Chu, CM, Kao, S & Tsai, SH 2010, 'Trends in child and adolescent injury mortality in Taiwan, 1986-2006', Taiwan Journal of Public Health, vol. 29, no. 1, pp. 22-32.
Chien, W. U Chien ; Pai, Lu ; Chu, Chi Ming ; Kao, Senyeong ; Tsai, Shin Han. / Trends in child and adolescent injury mortality in Taiwan, 1986-2006. In: Taiwan Journal of Public Health. 2010 ; Vol. 29, No. 1. pp. 22-32.
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