Trend of Nutritional Support in Preterm Infants

Man Yau Ho, Yu Hsuan Yen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Without appropriate nutritional support, preterm infants fail to grow after birth and have malnutrition. The main reason for delayed feeding is fear of immaturity of gastrointestinal function. The principles of nutritional practice should be as follows: (1) minimal early initiation of enteral feeding with breast milk (0.5-1 mL/h) to start on Day 1 if possible and gradual increase as tolerated; (2) early aggressive parenteral nutrition as soon as possible; (3) provision of lipids at rates that will meet the additional energy needs of about 2-3 g/kg/d; and (4) attempt to increase enteral feeding rather than parenteral nutrition.

Original languageEnglish
JournalPediatrics and Neonatology
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - Jul 23 2015

Fingerprint

Nutritional Support
Parenteral Nutrition
Enteral Nutrition
Premature Infants
Human Milk
Malnutrition
Fear
Parturition
Lipids

Keywords

  • Enteral feeding
  • Nutritional support
  • Parenteral nutrition
  • Preterm infant

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Trend of Nutritional Support in Preterm Infants. / Ho, Man Yau; Yen, Yu Hsuan.

In: Pediatrics and Neonatology, 23.07.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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