Trend and pattern of herb and supplement use in the United States: Results from the 2002, 2007, and 2012 national health interview surveys

Chung Hsuen Wu, Chi Chuan Wang, Meng Ting Tsai, Wan Ting Huang, Jae Kennedy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

37 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background. In 1990s, complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), including use of herbs and supplements, gained popularity in the United States. However, more recent surveys suggest that demand for herbs and supplements has stabilized.

Objective. This study examined the prevalence, patterns, and changes in herb and supplement use among the US adults, using the 2002, 2007, and 2012 National Health Interview Surveys (NHIS).

Methods. Weighted population estimates were derived from three complementary and alternative medicine supplements to the NHIS. Prevalence rates for herb and supplement use were compared, using Wald chi-square tests to measure changes between years.

Results. An estimated 40.6 million US adults reported herb and supplement use in 2012. However, the rate of herb and supplement use dropped from 18.9% in 2002 to 17.9% in 2007 and 2012 (P

Conclusion. Herb and supplements use remains common in the USA, but adult use rates are on the decline. It is still important for health care providers to ask patients about herb and supplement use.

Original languageEnglish
Article number872320
JournalEvidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume2014
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 10 2014

Fingerprint

Complementary Therapies
Health Surveys
Interviews
Chi-Square Distribution
Health Personnel
Cross-Sectional Studies
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Complementary and alternative medicine

Cite this

Trend and pattern of herb and supplement use in the United States : Results from the 2002, 2007, and 2012 national health interview surveys. / Wu, Chung Hsuen; Wang, Chi Chuan; Tsai, Meng Ting; Huang, Wan Ting; Kennedy, Jae.

In: Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, Vol. 2014, 872320, 10.12.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{5f86dbc64f8841c8a54a453cb1046488,
title = "Trend and pattern of herb and supplement use in the United States: Results from the 2002, 2007, and 2012 national health interview surveys",
abstract = "Background. In 1990s, complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), including use of herbs and supplements, gained popularity in the United States. However, more recent surveys suggest that demand for herbs and supplements has stabilized.Objective. This study examined the prevalence, patterns, and changes in herb and supplement use among the US adults, using the 2002, 2007, and 2012 National Health Interview Surveys (NHIS).Methods. Weighted population estimates were derived from three complementary and alternative medicine supplements to the NHIS. Prevalence rates for herb and supplement use were compared, using Wald chi-square tests to measure changes between years.Results. An estimated 40.6 million US adults reported herb and supplement use in 2012. However, the rate of herb and supplement use dropped from 18.9{\%} in 2002 to 17.9{\%} in 2007 and 2012 (PConclusion. Herb and supplements use remains common in the USA, but adult use rates are on the decline. It is still important for health care providers to ask patients about herb and supplement use.",
author = "Wu, {Chung Hsuen} and Wang, {Chi Chuan} and Tsai, {Meng Ting} and Huang, {Wan Ting} and Jae Kennedy",
year = "2014",
month = "12",
day = "10",
doi = "10.1155/2014/872320",
language = "English",
volume = "2014",
journal = "Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine",
issn = "1741-427X",
publisher = "Hindawi Publishing Corporation",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Trend and pattern of herb and supplement use in the United States

T2 - Results from the 2002, 2007, and 2012 national health interview surveys

AU - Wu, Chung Hsuen

AU - Wang, Chi Chuan

AU - Tsai, Meng Ting

AU - Huang, Wan Ting

AU - Kennedy, Jae

PY - 2014/12/10

Y1 - 2014/12/10

N2 - Background. In 1990s, complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), including use of herbs and supplements, gained popularity in the United States. However, more recent surveys suggest that demand for herbs and supplements has stabilized.Objective. This study examined the prevalence, patterns, and changes in herb and supplement use among the US adults, using the 2002, 2007, and 2012 National Health Interview Surveys (NHIS).Methods. Weighted population estimates were derived from three complementary and alternative medicine supplements to the NHIS. Prevalence rates for herb and supplement use were compared, using Wald chi-square tests to measure changes between years.Results. An estimated 40.6 million US adults reported herb and supplement use in 2012. However, the rate of herb and supplement use dropped from 18.9% in 2002 to 17.9% in 2007 and 2012 (PConclusion. Herb and supplements use remains common in the USA, but adult use rates are on the decline. It is still important for health care providers to ask patients about herb and supplement use.

AB - Background. In 1990s, complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), including use of herbs and supplements, gained popularity in the United States. However, more recent surveys suggest that demand for herbs and supplements has stabilized.Objective. This study examined the prevalence, patterns, and changes in herb and supplement use among the US adults, using the 2002, 2007, and 2012 National Health Interview Surveys (NHIS).Methods. Weighted population estimates were derived from three complementary and alternative medicine supplements to the NHIS. Prevalence rates for herb and supplement use were compared, using Wald chi-square tests to measure changes between years.Results. An estimated 40.6 million US adults reported herb and supplement use in 2012. However, the rate of herb and supplement use dropped from 18.9% in 2002 to 17.9% in 2007 and 2012 (PConclusion. Herb and supplements use remains common in the USA, but adult use rates are on the decline. It is still important for health care providers to ask patients about herb and supplement use.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84919819730&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84919819730&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1155/2014/872320

DO - 10.1155/2014/872320

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:84919819730

VL - 2014

JO - Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine

JF - Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine

SN - 1741-427X

M1 - 872320

ER -