Treatment-seeking behavior of people with epilepsy in Taiwan: A preliminary study

Yi-Chun Kuan, Der Jen Yen, Chun Hing Yiu, Yung Yang Lin, Shoen Yoeng Kwan, Chien Chen, Chien Chen Chou, Hsiang Yu Yu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To understand the treatment-seeking behavior of people with epilepsy (PWE), 403 PWE were surveyed using structured face-to-face interviews. Nearly half (49.1%) of them had previously tried complementary and alternative medicine (CAM); traditional Chinese medicine (51.5%) and temple worship (48.0%) were the most frequently used forms of CAM. In the 155 patients with adult-onset epilepsy, seeking CAM was substantially more common among females (OR. = 2.11, 95% CI. = 1.05-4.24, P= 0.036), patients with frequent seizures (OR. = 2.68, 95% CI. = 1.30-5.53, P= 0.008), patients with less educated parents (OR. = 2.16, 95% CI. = 1.06-4.41, P= 0.034), and patients with religious beliefs (OR. = 2.84, 95% CI. = 1.23-6.56, P= 0.015). In the 248 patients with childhood-onset epilepsy, frequent seizures (OR. = 2.23, 95% CI. = 1.32-3.77, P= 0.003) and lower level of parental education (OR. = 2.71, 95% CI. = 1.45-5.06, P= 0.002) were significantly associated with CAM use. The patients who seek CAM before receiving conventional medical treatment decreased after implementation of the National Health Insurance (NHI) (34/188 before NHI vs 22/215 after NHI, P= 0.023). This study showed that the prevalence of CAM use by PWE in Taiwan is high and that a convenient NHI program can affect treatment-seeking behavior.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)308-312
Number of pages5
JournalEpilepsy and Behavior
Volume22
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2011

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Complementary Therapies
Taiwan
Epilepsy
National Health Programs
Therapeutics
Seizures
Chinese Traditional Medicine
Religion
Cross-Sectional Studies
Parents
Interviews
Education

Keywords

  • Complementary and alternative medicine
  • Epilepsy
  • Herbal medicine
  • Temple worship
  • Traditional chinese medicine
  • Treatment seeking

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Behavioral Neuroscience
  • Neurology

Cite this

Treatment-seeking behavior of people with epilepsy in Taiwan : A preliminary study. / Kuan, Yi-Chun; Yen, Der Jen; Yiu, Chun Hing; Lin, Yung Yang; Kwan, Shoen Yoeng; Chen, Chien; Chou, Chien Chen; Yu, Hsiang Yu.

In: Epilepsy and Behavior, Vol. 22, No. 2, 10.2011, p. 308-312.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kuan, Y-C, Yen, DJ, Yiu, CH, Lin, YY, Kwan, SY, Chen, C, Chou, CC & Yu, HY 2011, 'Treatment-seeking behavior of people with epilepsy in Taiwan: A preliminary study', Epilepsy and Behavior, vol. 22, no. 2, pp. 308-312. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.yebeh.2011.06.034
Kuan, Yi-Chun ; Yen, Der Jen ; Yiu, Chun Hing ; Lin, Yung Yang ; Kwan, Shoen Yoeng ; Chen, Chien ; Chou, Chien Chen ; Yu, Hsiang Yu. / Treatment-seeking behavior of people with epilepsy in Taiwan : A preliminary study. In: Epilepsy and Behavior. 2011 ; Vol. 22, No. 2. pp. 308-312.
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