Traumatic osteoarthritis-induced persistent mechanical hyperalgesia in a rat model of anterior cruciate ligament transection plus a medial meniscectomy

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Abstract

Background: Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative joint disease characterized by progressive cartilage degeneration, subchondral bone changes, osteophyte formation, and synovitis. A major symptom is pain that is triggered by peripheral and central changes within the pain pathways. Some surgery-induced joint instability rat models of OA were described to mimic traumatic OA. Several behavioral tests were developed to access OA-induced pain. However, follow-up in most studies usually only occurred for about 4 weeks. Since traumatic OA is a chronic disease which gradually develops after trauma, the pattern of pain might differ between early and late stages after the trauma. Purpose: To observe the time-dependent development of hypersensitivity after traumatic OA and to determine the best timing and methods to investigate traumatic OA-induced pain. Methods: Anterior cruciate ligament transection plus medial meniscectomy was used to induce traumatic OA in Sprague-Dawley rats. Traumatic OA-induced pain was evaluated using four different behavioral tests for 15 weeks. Results: A significant difference in mechanical hypersensitivity developed throughout the observational period. It was worst in the first 3 weeks after the operation, then became less significant after 5 weeks but persisted. There were no differences in thermal hyperalgesia or motor coordination. Conclusion: Traumatic OA induced mechanical hyperalgesia but did not cause thermal hyperalgesia or influence motor coordination. Furthermore, to investigate chronic pain induced by OA, the observational period should be at least 5 weeks after the intervention. These findings may help in further research and improve our understanding of traumatic OA-induced pain mechanisms.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)41-50
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Pain Research
Volume11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2018

Fingerprint

Anterior Cruciate Ligament
Hyperalgesia
Osteoarthritis
Pain
Hypersensitivity
Joint Instability
Osteophyte
Synovitis
Wounds and Injuries
Chronic Pain
Cartilage
Sprague Dawley Rats
Chronic Disease

Keywords

  • Acute and chronic pain
  • Mechanical hyperalgesia
  • Motor coordination
  • Thermal hyperalgesia
  • Traumatic osteoarthritis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

Cite this

@article{407dd5fa37884b478997f584f278da4b,
title = "Traumatic osteoarthritis-induced persistent mechanical hyperalgesia in a rat model of anterior cruciate ligament transection plus a medial meniscectomy",
abstract = "Background: Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative joint disease characterized by progressive cartilage degeneration, subchondral bone changes, osteophyte formation, and synovitis. A major symptom is pain that is triggered by peripheral and central changes within the pain pathways. Some surgery-induced joint instability rat models of OA were described to mimic traumatic OA. Several behavioral tests were developed to access OA-induced pain. However, follow-up in most studies usually only occurred for about 4 weeks. Since traumatic OA is a chronic disease which gradually develops after trauma, the pattern of pain might differ between early and late stages after the trauma. Purpose: To observe the time-dependent development of hypersensitivity after traumatic OA and to determine the best timing and methods to investigate traumatic OA-induced pain. Methods: Anterior cruciate ligament transection plus medial meniscectomy was used to induce traumatic OA in Sprague-Dawley rats. Traumatic OA-induced pain was evaluated using four different behavioral tests for 15 weeks. Results: A significant difference in mechanical hypersensitivity developed throughout the observational period. It was worst in the first 3 weeks after the operation, then became less significant after 5 weeks but persisted. There were no differences in thermal hyperalgesia or motor coordination. Conclusion: Traumatic OA induced mechanical hyperalgesia but did not cause thermal hyperalgesia or influence motor coordination. Furthermore, to investigate chronic pain induced by OA, the observational period should be at least 5 weeks after the intervention. These findings may help in further research and improve our understanding of traumatic OA-induced pain mechanisms.",
keywords = "Acute and chronic pain, Mechanical hyperalgesia, Motor coordination, Thermal hyperalgesia, Traumatic osteoarthritis",
author = "Tsai, {Hsiao Chien} and Chen, {Ta Liang} and Chen, {Yu Pin} and Chen, {Ruei Ming}",
year = "2018",
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language = "English",
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journal = "Journal of Pain Research",
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T1 - Traumatic osteoarthritis-induced persistent mechanical hyperalgesia in a rat model of anterior cruciate ligament transection plus a medial meniscectomy

AU - Tsai, Hsiao Chien

AU - Chen, Ta Liang

AU - Chen, Yu Pin

AU - Chen, Ruei Ming

PY - 2018/1/1

Y1 - 2018/1/1

N2 - Background: Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative joint disease characterized by progressive cartilage degeneration, subchondral bone changes, osteophyte formation, and synovitis. A major symptom is pain that is triggered by peripheral and central changes within the pain pathways. Some surgery-induced joint instability rat models of OA were described to mimic traumatic OA. Several behavioral tests were developed to access OA-induced pain. However, follow-up in most studies usually only occurred for about 4 weeks. Since traumatic OA is a chronic disease which gradually develops after trauma, the pattern of pain might differ between early and late stages after the trauma. Purpose: To observe the time-dependent development of hypersensitivity after traumatic OA and to determine the best timing and methods to investigate traumatic OA-induced pain. Methods: Anterior cruciate ligament transection plus medial meniscectomy was used to induce traumatic OA in Sprague-Dawley rats. Traumatic OA-induced pain was evaluated using four different behavioral tests for 15 weeks. Results: A significant difference in mechanical hypersensitivity developed throughout the observational period. It was worst in the first 3 weeks after the operation, then became less significant after 5 weeks but persisted. There were no differences in thermal hyperalgesia or motor coordination. Conclusion: Traumatic OA induced mechanical hyperalgesia but did not cause thermal hyperalgesia or influence motor coordination. Furthermore, to investigate chronic pain induced by OA, the observational period should be at least 5 weeks after the intervention. These findings may help in further research and improve our understanding of traumatic OA-induced pain mechanisms.

AB - Background: Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative joint disease characterized by progressive cartilage degeneration, subchondral bone changes, osteophyte formation, and synovitis. A major symptom is pain that is triggered by peripheral and central changes within the pain pathways. Some surgery-induced joint instability rat models of OA were described to mimic traumatic OA. Several behavioral tests were developed to access OA-induced pain. However, follow-up in most studies usually only occurred for about 4 weeks. Since traumatic OA is a chronic disease which gradually develops after trauma, the pattern of pain might differ between early and late stages after the trauma. Purpose: To observe the time-dependent development of hypersensitivity after traumatic OA and to determine the best timing and methods to investigate traumatic OA-induced pain. Methods: Anterior cruciate ligament transection plus medial meniscectomy was used to induce traumatic OA in Sprague-Dawley rats. Traumatic OA-induced pain was evaluated using four different behavioral tests for 15 weeks. Results: A significant difference in mechanical hypersensitivity developed throughout the observational period. It was worst in the first 3 weeks after the operation, then became less significant after 5 weeks but persisted. There were no differences in thermal hyperalgesia or motor coordination. Conclusion: Traumatic OA induced mechanical hyperalgesia but did not cause thermal hyperalgesia or influence motor coordination. Furthermore, to investigate chronic pain induced by OA, the observational period should be at least 5 weeks after the intervention. These findings may help in further research and improve our understanding of traumatic OA-induced pain mechanisms.

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