Transdural cortical stabbing facilitates the drainage of edema fluid out of cold-injured brain.

T. L. Chiou, Y. H. Chiang, W. S. Song, S. S. Lin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Recent experimental results indicate that cerebral glia lining and glia limitans may be barriers for plasma protein extravasated from injured cerebral microvessels flowing into the adjacent subarachnoid space. Therefore, it has been hypothesized that a transdural cortical stabbing which opens both the pia lining and glia limitans may facilitate drainage of edema fluid into the subarachnoid space and minimize brain edema. This hypothesis was tested in Sprague-Dawley rats with a transdural cold-injury on the right parietal cortex. The animals were sacrificed 24 hours later. One hour before being sacrificed 0.6 ml of 2% Evans blue was intravenously injected to determining the Evans blue distribution area. For measuring the inulin retention volume in the brain, 14C-inulin (10 microCi) in 1 ml of saline was injected intravenously at 10 min before sacrifice. The extent of brain edema was assessed by measuring the water content, the inulin retention volume, and the distribution area of Evans blue in the brain. Our results showed that the transdural cortical stabbing did not alter the water content of the cerebral hemisphere with cold lesion. However, it did effectively diminish the inulin retention volume by 26% as well as the distribution area of Evans blue by 22% in the cerebral hemisphere with cold lesion. In conclusion, a transdural cortical stabbing on the injured cortex may be beneficial for vasogenic brain edema.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)459-461
Number of pages3
JournalActa Neurochirurgica, Supplementum
Volume60
Publication statusPublished - 1994
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Evans Blue
Inulin
Drainage
Edema
Brain Edema
Neuroglia
Subarachnoid Space
Brain
Cerebrum
Parietal Lobe
Water
Microvessels
Sprague Dawley Rats
Blood Proteins

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Transdural cortical stabbing facilitates the drainage of edema fluid out of cold-injured brain. / Chiou, T. L.; Chiang, Y. H.; Song, W. S.; Lin, S. S.

In: Acta Neurochirurgica, Supplementum, Vol. 60, 1994, p. 459-461.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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