Tobacco Advertisement Liking, Vulnerability Factors, and Tobacco Use among Young Adults

Brianna A Lienemann, Shyanika W Rose, Jennifer B Unger, Helen I Meissner, M Justin Byron, Lourdes Baezconde-Garbanati, Li-Ling Huang, Tess Boley Cruz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: Young adulthood (ages 18-24) is a crucial period in the development of long-term tobacco use patterns. Tobacco advertising and promotion lead to the initiation and continuation of smoking among young adults. We examined whether vulnerability factors moderated the association between tobacco advertisement liking and tobacco use in the United States.

Methods: Analyses were conducted among 9,109 U.S. young adults in the nationally-representative Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health (PATH) Study Wave 1 (2013-14). Participants viewed 20 randomly selected sets of tobacco advertisements (five each for cigarettes, e-cigarettes, cigars, and smokeless tobacco) and indicated whether they liked each ad. The outcome variables were past 30-day cigarette, e-cigarette, cigar, and smokeless tobacco use. Covariates included tobacco advertisement liking, age, sex, race/ethnicity, sexual orientation, education, poverty level, military service, and internalizing and externalizing mental health symptoms.

Results: Liking tobacco advertisements was associated with tobacco use, and this association was particularly strong among those with lower educational attainment (cigarettes, cigars) and living below the poverty level (e-cigarettes, smokeless tobacco).

Conclusions: The association between tobacco advertisement liking and tobacco use was stronger among young adults with lower educational attainment and those living below the poverty level. Policies that restrict advertising exposure and promote counter-marketing messages in this population could reduce their risk.

Original languageEnglish
JournalNicotine and Tobacco Research
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019

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Tobacco Use
Tobacco Products
Tobacco
Young Adult
Smokeless Tobacco
Poverty
Marketing
Sexual Behavior
Population
Mental Health
Smoking
Education
Health

Cite this

Lienemann, B. A., Rose, S. W., Unger, J. B., Meissner, H. I., Byron, M. J., Baezconde-Garbanati, L., ... Cruz, T. B. (2019). Tobacco Advertisement Liking, Vulnerability Factors, and Tobacco Use among Young Adults. Nicotine and Tobacco Research. https://doi.org/10.1093/ntr/nty220

Tobacco Advertisement Liking, Vulnerability Factors, and Tobacco Use among Young Adults. / Lienemann, Brianna A; Rose, Shyanika W; Unger, Jennifer B; Meissner, Helen I; Byron, M Justin; Baezconde-Garbanati, Lourdes; Huang, Li-Ling; Cruz, Tess Boley.

In: Nicotine and Tobacco Research, 2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lienemann, Brianna A ; Rose, Shyanika W ; Unger, Jennifer B ; Meissner, Helen I ; Byron, M Justin ; Baezconde-Garbanati, Lourdes ; Huang, Li-Ling ; Cruz, Tess Boley. / Tobacco Advertisement Liking, Vulnerability Factors, and Tobacco Use among Young Adults. In: Nicotine and Tobacco Research. 2019.
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abstract = "Introduction: Young adulthood (ages 18-24) is a crucial period in the development of long-term tobacco use patterns. Tobacco advertising and promotion lead to the initiation and continuation of smoking among young adults. We examined whether vulnerability factors moderated the association between tobacco advertisement liking and tobacco use in the United States.Methods: Analyses were conducted among 9,109 U.S. young adults in the nationally-representative Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health (PATH) Study Wave 1 (2013-14). Participants viewed 20 randomly selected sets of tobacco advertisements (five each for cigarettes, e-cigarettes, cigars, and smokeless tobacco) and indicated whether they liked each ad. The outcome variables were past 30-day cigarette, e-cigarette, cigar, and smokeless tobacco use. Covariates included tobacco advertisement liking, age, sex, race/ethnicity, sexual orientation, education, poverty level, military service, and internalizing and externalizing mental health symptoms.Results: Liking tobacco advertisements was associated with tobacco use, and this association was particularly strong among those with lower educational attainment (cigarettes, cigars) and living below the poverty level (e-cigarettes, smokeless tobacco).Conclusions: The association between tobacco advertisement liking and tobacco use was stronger among young adults with lower educational attainment and those living below the poverty level. Policies that restrict advertising exposure and promote counter-marketing messages in this population could reduce their risk.",
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