The usage pattern and knowledge of vitamin and mineral supplements in a freshmen college population of Taiwan

Xue Ping Hu, Chi Liang Chen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Vitamin/mineral supplement use by college freshmen students (476 males, 387 females) was assessed by means of an anonymous, self-administered questionnaire. Students from four different fields were involved in this study (152 from the medical school, 191 from the nutrition department, 265 from the natural science department and 255 from other departments). Students majors were not related to supplement use, but were with drinking habits (p=0.004). Use of Supplements (n=332, 38.6% of total) was related to sex and parent education level (p <0.05). Users tended to have highly educated parents and to be female. Multivitamins and single-dose vitamin C were the most frequent choices (53.7% and 59.2% respectively). Health concern/beliefs motivated individuals to use supplements due to their protective or therapeutic benefits. Nutritional knowledge was tested, and average scores were 6.71 ± 1.9 out of 10. Females had better scores than males on two knowledge questions (p <0.05). Majors were related to knowledge level. The nutrition majors group had the best scores and the literature and business group had the worst (p <0.05).

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)207-217
Number of pages11
JournalNutritional Sciences Journal
Volume22
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 1997

Fingerprint

Taiwan
Vitamins
Minerals
vitamins
Students
minerals
students
parent education
health beliefs
vitamin-mineral supplements
nutrition
Population
Natural Science Disciplines
Sex Education
educational status
college students
drinking
Medical Schools
Ascorbic Acid
Drinking

Keywords

  • College students
  • Nutritional knowledge
  • Vitamin/mineral supplement

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)

Cite this

The usage pattern and knowledge of vitamin and mineral supplements in a freshmen college population of Taiwan. / Hu, Xue Ping; Chen, Chi Liang.

In: Nutritional Sciences Journal, Vol. 22, No. 2, 1997, p. 207-217.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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