The Time-Frequency Analysis of the Pudendo-to-Pudendal Nerve and Pelvic-to-Pudendal Nerve Reflexes in Anesthetized Intact Rats

Hui Yi Chang, Chi Wei Peng, Jia Jin Janson Chen, Chen Li Cheng, William C. DeGroat

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Two main functions of lower urinary tract, storage and periodic elimination of urine, are regulated by a complex neural control system located in the brain and spinal cord which coordinates the activity of the reservoir (urinary bladder) and the outlet (bladder neck, urethra and urethral sphincter). These organs are regulated by three sets of peripheral nerves: sacral parasympathetic (pelvic nerves), thoracolumber sympathetic nerves (hypogastric nerves) which innervate the bladder trigone and prostate, and sacral somatic nerves (pudendal nerves) which innervate external urethral sphincter (EUS). The relationship between the bladder and EUS is controlled by reflex pathways in the lumbosacral spinal cord that are activated by primary afferent input from the bladder or the urethra. This study was conducted to examine the reflexes that mediate bladder and sphincter coordination. We compared the properties of the pelvic nerve afferent to pudendal nerve reflex (pelvic-to-pudendal nerve reflex) and the pudendal nerve afferent to pudendal nerve reflex (pudendo-to-pudendal nerve reflex). For data analysis, we utilized the time-frequency analysis in Matlab to verify the components of pelvic-to-pudendal nerve reflex. The result of pelvic-to-pudendal nerve reflex indicates that there are two frequency bands: low-frequency nerve action potential low frequency (below 50 Hz) and high frequency nerve signal (50-100 Hz). Moreover, our result showed that the analytic method could extract the components in the reflex signals in lower urinary system.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)17-22
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Medical and Biological Engineering
Volume24
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2004
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Pudendal Nerve
Reflex
Rats
Urethra
Urinary Bladder
Frequency bands
Brain
Control systems
Spinal Cord
Urinary Tract
Peripheral Nerves
Action Potentials
Prostate
Urine

Keywords

  • Bladder
  • Pelvic nerve
  • Pudendal nerve
  • Time-frequency analysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biophysics

Cite this

The Time-Frequency Analysis of the Pudendo-to-Pudendal Nerve and Pelvic-to-Pudendal Nerve Reflexes in Anesthetized Intact Rats. / Chang, Hui Yi; Peng, Chi Wei; Chen, Jia Jin Janson; Cheng, Chen Li; DeGroat, William C.

In: Journal of Medical and Biological Engineering, Vol. 24, No. 1, 03.2004, p. 17-22.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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